LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter



Tax deductible

The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.
In the United States, your donations are tax deductible.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » can you run while in treatment

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: can you run while in treatment
Joe Bob
Member
Member # 45015

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Joe Bob     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am reading you need to exercise while in treatment but not aerobic exercise. I am trying to decide if my daughter should run track this season. She is about to start chronic lyme treatments.
Posts: 58 | From GA | Registered: Dec 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
No, she should not.

It's important to be that clear but now for other suggestions so that she both feel connection with others and some kind of enjoyment from activity.

It's important that she not be on any competitive team, not required to "show up" or clock in any kind of hours, skill tests.

It can be hard for a runner to stop running, though. If she feels up to it, she should ask her LLMD and they may determine that - for her - it may be okay to walk at a good pace, maybe run for a very short time (a minute).

Again, it depends on the individual. In a few instances, there has been a cyclist or runner - but as a solo, on their in their own way.

Still, there are important considerations to the HEART with aerobics during infection.

Her current condition & interests will, obviously, color the decisions. However, even with slower activity, she needs the freedom to stop at a moment's notice.


*** A person with lyme can feel great one moment and then their body may just stop, literally, not be able to move the next, or walk back to where they started. And there is often no warning. ***

Often, they may do great and really enjoy an activity one day but, then, not be able to move at all the next day - or for several days afterward. Again, often no notice of this.

After pushing too hard, I became bed-bound for a full year and had to learn how to walk, talk, read & write again - all over. Twice. I was not yet diagnosed then, and no treatment at all. No doctors would believe me about any of this.

At least your daughter has an advantage in being younger and getting treatment.

Learning to read the subtle signs and know when to push and when not to push - it takes a long time, though, whatever one's age. This is about being wiser, not faster, though.

She might adapt what she already loves, or can find other kinds of activity, maybe a Tai Chi or gentle yoga class. Maybe even singing. Singing is more of an exercise than one might think as it requires steady breathing.

IF, only if, her joints, tendons and ligaments are in fine shape - she could do some gentle weight lifting. But that needs to be at her own speed, and that can vary day to day, minute to minute.

Swimming, if the water is not too cold - again, though, gentle, more for the sheer enjoyment of moving in the water. Maybe some kind of music water movement - if not too swift.

Her LLMD / LL ND would be the best to guide her.

There may be days (or long periods) where any exercise is impossible for some and they benefit from a massage therapist (house call, if possible) just gently massaging tissue and then also offering some gentle kinds of resistance exercises where the therapist does most of the work.

Family members can also learn certain techniques and some kinds of resistance "games" can be developed.

While each day may be different, some kind of regularity is important - a change of scene, altering approaches, etc. Some kind of movement every day does matter. Time with nature, fresh air, the sky . . . and BREATHING that is focused, deep, steady and full.

She might get enjoyment from starting a Tai Chi or Qi gong group for a few close friends or family -- with a tutor's help.

Even just walking. She should select what bring her joy and connection and not focus on any kind of achievement, just focus on the enjoyment of it (as long as she does not suffer "payback" the next day, as can often happen).

One good rule is think, realistically of what you can do and then cut it in half.
-

[ 12-20-2014, 04:14 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I can't find now in my notes but Burrascano has some good physical therapy guidelines. Still, weight training is not for everyone (if joint, tendon issues) and the timing of it may not work for many.

Even just five minutes can be helpful. And even a walk around the block is important - if not in heavy traffic, of course.

DANCE might be enjoyable, get a tutor to teach a few steps / routines in a particular style - and she can take that in several directions - even just in the living room with a couple friends.

I suggest staying away from heavy beat music, though, as that can hard on the heart, the adrenals and lyme spirochetes hate vibration so it could increase the "anger" and then their toxic spew. They also might go deeper and into cyst form when confronted with deep vibrations.

Heavy bass is also very taxing on the heart and the heart takes quite a load with lyme.

But there are all kinds of beautiful music that she might enjoy working up some moves to.

ADRENAL support is key.

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP & ADRENAL SUPPORT


http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/77325

CARDIAC Explanations & ENERGY SUPPORT, helping the Mitochonidria and myelin sheath.

Mitochondria issues are important with lyme.

Scroll down to see exercise consideration here and Burrascano's PT guidelines.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Exercise also very much involves the liver. With lyme, the liver is very stressed from lyme toxins and treatment (another reason why aerobics can damage when the liver is just too overloaded to push through with speed or heavy loads).

Gentle exercise helps the liver, all organs - and circulation. Liver support is also very helpful for the body to be able to move and function.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=030792;p=0

LIVER & KIDNEY SUPPORT & and several HERXHEIMER support links, too.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Joe Bob
Member
Member # 45015

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Joe Bob     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you so much for such a helpful answer. I was reading off of Burrascano's treatment protocol so you don't have to look for yours. I knew this was a possiblity. I just wanted confirmation. We meet with a LLD in a few weeks. Thanks again for your help.
Posts: 58 | From GA | Registered: Dec 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Singing has similar benefits for the brain as exercise. Just read this today and have read of similar brain / immune benefits for learning a musical instrument (if it does not hurt the body). I see the relevance for many.

The kinds of endorphins from making music might also compensate for those that used to gained by running in the wind if one can't do that for a time. My thought.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/20/nyregion/at-voice-charter-school-in-queens-students-have-outperformed-their-peers-academically.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=Moth-Visi ble&module=inside-nyt-region®ion=inside-nyt-region&WT.nav=inside-nyt-region&_r=0

School Finds Music Is the Food of Learning

At VOICE Charter School in Queens, Students Have Outperformed Their Peers Academically

By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS - The New York Times -
DEC. 19, 2014

Excerpts:

. . . They are pupils at Voice Charter School in Queens, where students learn

to read music, execute complicated harmonies and play a little piano

in the music classes they attend at least once a day, and where, far more than in other general education schools, they learn to sing, sing, sing. . . .

. . . Academically, students at Voice did significantly better than the city average on New York State math exams last year, with 70 percent of its students passing, compared with 39 percent citywide.

Their English performance was less impressive, but with 39 percent passing, it still beat the citywide average of 30 percent. . . .

. . . Younger students at Voice usually have music twice a day, and older students once, on average. . . .

. . . [Full article, a slide show and a 2:30 video at link above.

Note: Audio & flash-trigger seizure alert with commercial prior to video, keep sound down until into the video.]
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Joe Bob,

Good luck with your daughter's treatment journey. I'm glad she has you to do some of the ground work for her, and so glad she has your understanding. That is of great benefit to her.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Judie
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 38323

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Judie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Make sure your daughter NEVER takes fluoroquinolone antibiotics (cipro, avelox, levaquin). It's not worth the risk and loading up on magnesium isn't the fix for everyone.

They cause permanent tendonitis and peripheral neuropathy. Some people end up crippled. If she's athletic, you need to be very careful to differentiate between and adverse drug reaction and a herxheimer reaction.


2013 FDA Warning about Fluoroquinolone antibiotics causing PERMANENT damage

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=130342;p=0#000032

Flagyl and tinidazole can also cause peripheral neuropathy along with plain quinolones, not just fluoroquinolones.

Posts: 2839 | From California | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
xemoterp1
Member
Member # 44587

Icon 1 posted      Profile for xemoterp1     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
As someone recently diagnosed with Lyme Disease, Babesia and Bartonella, I did not give up running or cycling. Pain when running was my first Lyme symptom ....

The key is listening to your body. I used to run 5 miles almost every day, or bicycle 25-35 miles on off days. My endurance took a beating with Lyme, but I am still able to run every other day (4-5 miles) or indoor cycle about 10-12 miles. I now take every other day off (take a long walk on those days if I feel up to it).

If your daughter is in good shape, the running may be helpful to her as long as she is not taking antibiotics that are known to weaken joints or muscles.

I have been on Docycycline and Tindamax for 3 months so far and starting next week I stop those and start Mepron, Zythromax and Rifampin .... Let the fun begin [Smile]

I still won't give up running or cycling .... But I do listen to my body much more now ....

Posts: 19 | From Maryland | Registered: Sep 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
triathlongal
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 31684

Icon 1 posted      Profile for triathlongal     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by xemoterp1:
As someone recently diagnosed with Lyme Disease, Babesia and Bartonella, I did not give up running or cycling. Pain when running was my first Lyme symptom ....

The key is listening to your body. I used to run 5 miles almost every day, or bicycle 25-35 miles on off days. My endurance took a beating with Lyme, but I am still able to run every other day (4-5 miles) or indoor cycle about 10-12 miles. I now take every other day off (take a long walk on those days if I feel up to it).

If your daughter is in good shape, the running may be helpful to her as long as she is not taking antibiotics that are known to weaken joints or muscles.

I have been on Docycycline and Tindamax for 3 months so far and starting next week I stop those and start Mepron, Zythromax and Rifampin .... Let the fun begin [Smile]

I still won't give up running or cycling .... But I do listen to my body much more now ....

I agree. Running helped me in my treatment. I was a competitive endurance athlete before Lyme and had to stop when I was very very ill. As I felt better running was a part of my healing but you need to be very careful w/ effort and distance. I went from half ironmans to dragging myself just to get out of bed. After years of intense treatment I am back to 95%. Listen to your body and do not push yourself when sick.
Posts: 151 | From North East | Registered: May 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
still winning
Member
Member # 44439

Icon 1 posted      Profile for still winning     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think exercising is extremely important with lyme disease. When I first got lyme, I had to sleep in the gym an hour just to get up the energy to work out.

I have always worked out, before having lyme and now having lyme (since 1990). If not for working out, I think I would be immobile.

Still Winning

Posts: 55 | From Maryland | Registered: Aug 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

© 1993-2019 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to the Terms and Conditions.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


Home | Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Webmaster