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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » we are all Septic, correct?

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Author Topic: we are all Septic, correct?
SusanH
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We are all Septic, correct? How can we get a diagnosis on paper for sepsis?

Has anyone?

Thank you,
Susan

Fact: Septic shock is the most common cause of death in intensive care units in the United States (Fitch, et al., 2002).
[hi]

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Keebler
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Update: This has turned into a REFERENCE LINKS SET of sorts, with detail that may be of help during an emergency and important issues during flu season and for a wide array of infections as well.

------------------------------------------

Q: " we are all Septic, correct? "

No. Not to that degree as in septic shock or sepsis. That would be an emergency situation where minutes matters between life and death, RED ALERT, emergency time.


You have an excellent question, though it's a matter of degrees and terms.

With chronic stealth infection - chronic inflammation & toxicity is dangerous but not to the point of volcanic escalation as with septic shock.

While not to that level, similar issues at work: Infection, toxicity and the body's (especially liver / kidneys) ability or inability to deal with an overwhelming cytokine storm.

It's important to understand how, with true septic shock, things can get worse if medical care is not top notch & immediate.


So, to deal with lesser levels of toxicity that come with lyme / TBD, with our LLMDs, LL NDs (if lucky) or even just one our own, we just have to do what we can on our own

addressing infection(s) directly

with good liver, kidney and adrenal support.

Reduce Inflammation with antioxidants and the like to reduce the oxidative action / damage & manage the cytokine storm

Hydration

Water, massage, nutrients . . .


IMO, the high use of acetaminophen in hospitals contributes to septic shock as the liver is blocked from making / processing glutathione and then ALL cells in the body are also blocking it. All cells then become so toxic, they cannot "circulate" and move out the toxic and in new fluids.

And glutathione is one major KEY to surviving septic shock.

Magnesium is also vital. IV glutathione and IV magnesium should be top of the list, but they are generally ignored in emergencies where they could save lives.

But ibuprofen has other risks. It constricts not just the blood vessels in the kidneys but the entire body. And that can cause all kinds of problems with toxicity build up.

Adrenal support is, too. But that's rather discounted. Or steroids' frequent use can cause infections to blossom and then make septic shock worse, rather than better. There are better ways to address inflammation.

Reducing inflammation is key, of course. But along with proper infection treatment, liver & kidney & adrenal support.

And QUIET. When the adrenals are in shock, absolute quite is required. This does not happen in hospital. Quite the opposite and I think that noise, lights and frenzy also contribute significantly to the death rate.

Get rid of the damn beeps on all that equipment, and I'd bet more would survive. Stop all the overhead intercom announcements, etc.


The medical folks do not consider chronic stealth infections, nor a lower level of septic shock.

First, they want to have an infection that they can easily find and AGREE with (lyme won't count for the IDSA types).

There are all kinds of infections - some can act very fast. With many of these, the body can go into a full life-threatening shock. Nothing less.

http://www.healthline.com/health/septic-shock#Overview1

Septic Shock - HealthLine
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[ 09-24-2016, 03:47 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=123746;p=0

Topic: MAGNESIUM - Informational Links set


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=030792;p=0

LIVER & KIDNEY SUPPORT & and several HERXHEIMER support links, too.


http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP & ADRENAL SUPPORT
-

[ 07-27-2016, 08:20 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Lymetoo
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If you are septic, then you need to be in the hospital ASAP or you will die.

So no, we are not septic.

--------------------
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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Keebler
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http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm.161.6.9903043#.VWOkw2fn97c

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Volume 161, Issue 6 - June 2000

The Effect of Glutathione and N-Acetylcysteine on Lipoperoxidative Damage in Patients with Early Septic Shock

Both the hyperproduction of oxygen free radicals (OFR) and the weakening of natural scavenging mechanisms have been implicated as contributors to multiple organ failure in septic shock.

This study examined whether the antioxidants glutathione (GSH) and N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) play a protective role against damage by OFR in early septic shock . . .

. . . In conclusion, the administration of high doses of NAC added to GSH significantly decreased the peroxidative stress of patients with septic shock.

- full article at link above.
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Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/116054?#000000

Topic: Glutathione . . . some considerations
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beaches
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Agree with LT. If you are septic, you will die unless you get immediate emergency care.

FYI, septicemia/sepsis occurs when a bacterial infection enters the bloodstream, for instance, from an untreated kidney infection.

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beaches
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Keebler, that's great to know about NAC and glutathione. Hopefully ER docs are reading that.

But when someone is in septic shock, they are very close to death. Immediate IV fluids and IV abx are required to save someone's life.

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Keebler
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beaches,

outlined in the abstract, these are intended to be done IV in such emergencies - along with anti-infection treatments, etc..

The doses of IV Glutathione and IV NAC are also much higher than the typical support supplements that we know about.

" . . . One group (Group B) also received 70 mg/kg/d of intravenous GSH, and a second group (Group C), 70 mg/kg/d of intravenous GSH and 75 mg/kg/d of intravenous NAC . . . "
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beaches
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Yes, but what ER's are aware of that and putting it into use? Practically none, I'm guessing.

And FWIW, NAC,especially via IV in high doses, would not be good for someone like me. How long would it take for them to figure that out?

Too long is what I'm thinking.

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Keebler
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That's the point. We have to become aware before we need to know such things.

And prevent it in the first place where at all possible.
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beaches
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I've been at the point of being septic. It can come upon someone VERY quickly and it is very frightening.

It isn't really preventable. If you are running a high fever, get to the ER, ASAP. That really is the best and only thing to do.

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Keebler
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If we knew to avoid acetaminophen and also to be sure to keep our antioxidants up, that could be some level of protection, in some cases.

What's preventable, sometimes, can be hospital mistakes or inadequate treatment that covers all the bases.

The more we (or our loved ones) know going in, the better chance we have of walking out. The article posted is about so many hospital deaths due to septic shock.

The more we know, the better our chances.

I was once literally kicked out of an ER at 2 a.m. for having seizures (triggered by overhead intercom). It was a horrible experience that did cause me damage. Paramedics strongly encouraged me to go after a night full of seizures. But it was a mistake. I would have done better not.

Fortunately, when my PCP found out, she wrote a letter to the ER instructing them that I really IV magnesium, most likely, at that time.

I have learned that I'd better know as much as possible because I may not be able to trust any hospital to think of my needs.

Knowing about the risks of septic shock - well, there are major factors that could save lives. I think a lot of hospitals are not doing all they could. I'm glad that was brought up.
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beaches
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Oh trust me, you have NO idea.

When you start spiking a fever, and you see it going from 102 to 103 upwards, your only shot is the ER. And that's not a hospital mistake.

Been there, done that, dozens of times. If it weren't for IV fluids and IV abx, I wouldn't be here to tell you about it.

Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening problem.

For anyone to think that having Lyme/cos equates to being "septic" is ridiculous. And that comes from someone who knows all too well just how serious and debilitating Lyme/cos are.

[ 05-26-2015, 08:56 AM: Message edited by: sixgoofykids ]

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Keebler
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I certainly do understand, more than you know.

I do not understand your concern about this thread, though. No one says it's not serious. The first link (in the first reply above) explains that fully. The progression of posts explains the seriousness of this and the urgent need. No one is taking this lightly.

All posts here are certainly well within reason. A question was asked. It was put into perspective regarding the wide range of toxicity issues & inflammation.

And also then some things discussed that could help were we to ever find ourselves or loved ones facing such an emergency. The death rate is high. the more we learn, the better chances of that changing.

[ 02-09-2018, 10:25 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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The question starting the thread is: " we are all Septic, correct? "

So, "no" was my answer. To which I added how the toxicity issue can be in degrees and - perhaps - how we might prevent it from getting too bad in some cases.

In case it was missed, an introduction from the start of thread to define what true sepsis is:

http://www.healthline.com/health/septic-shock#Overview1

What is Septic Shock - HealthLine
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[ 07-27-2016, 08:25 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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beaches
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I think that equating Lyme Disease with being septic, as the original poster did, is erroneous, to say the least.

There is clearly a lack of understanding of what sepsis is on these boards.

I can only hope that those who are reading these posts have a greater understanding of how serious and life-threatening sepsis is.

Unless you are given IV abx, you will die, period.

[ 05-26-2015, 10:49 AM: Message edited by: Lymetoo ]

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beaches
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I am very sorry to hear that your mother died from septic shock. I am sure that was just awful.

I apologize for saying that you had no idea. Obviously you do, firsthand.

I just don't see anyone discussing what you have posted, good, bad or indifferent. Of course, the more we know, the better. Odds are that no one in an ER would know any of this in a timely manner (or anytime soon).

Which is why I maintain that IV abx and fluids is the only way to pull through deadly sepsis.

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Keebler
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You say: " . . . just don't see anyone discussing what you have posted, good, bad or indifferent. . . . " (end quote).

Reply: It does not matter that people are not posting replies as that is not necessary. Hopefully, everyone will read the articles, etc. and pass them along. They do not require replies.

All the wonderful education / informational articles posted ARE "discussing it" in detail. Every link posted here is "discussing" the importance of it and offers education.

No one is equating lyme with septis. No one.

A question was asked, a very good question.

Hopefully, the answers have put it into perspective while then explaining how the similar yet different scale of toxicity that lyme can bring can be addressed. This is also important.

No one said IV antibiotics and other IVs were not vital with septic shock. No where is that said, it's stated quite clearly that anti-infection treatment is vital. In the link and in my posts.

Anti-infective treatment can go beyond antibiotics, though as antibiotics don't address all infections.

As for IV fluids, that is often not enough. With so many fatalities, clearly, there is a lot more that needs to be done and that likely will involve many aspects.

So, as the abstract points out, some researchers are looking into (along with anti-infection treatment) better ways to address the cytokine storm / inflammation with antioxidants such as IV glutathione, etc.

That is promising. In my world, very promising.

------
Separately, though from the topic of sepsis.

lyme does have a certain toxicity. Most LLMDs balance addressing the infections (whether lyme, babesia, or other tick borne infections on board with good liver support, this is usually managed.

To put it it perspective - for anyone new to lyme as to why liver support to help manage the toxicity is so important:

Regarding the toxicity, the biochemistry, the microbiology and all that, a starter set:


http://www.townsendletter.com/FebMar2006/lyme0206.htm

Biochemistry of Lyme Disease: Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochete/Cyst

by Prof. Robert W. Bradford and Henry W. Allen

Townsend Letter - February / March 2006

Excerpt:

Lyme Disease Toxin

Because many of the symptoms of Lyme disease involve the nervous system, it
was speculated that the spirochete produced a toxin that disrupted normal nerve function.

Through the use of DNA manipulations and a database of known protein toxin DNA sequences, a match was made with a selected Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) gene and a specific toxin in the database.

Protein generated from this cloned Bb gene was examined biochemically and found to have characteristics similar to that of botulinum, the toxin of Clostridium botulinum, a zinc endoproteinase.1


http://www.borelioza.org/materialy_lyme/the_complexities_of_lyme_disease.pdf

The Complexities of Lyme Disease (A Microbiology Tutorial)

by Thomas M. Grier - a 17-page pdf.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8tESJVvM88

The Biology of Lyme Disease: An Expert's Perspective

26 minute YouTube video - Jul 20, 2013

This is a 30 minute video with Dr. Alan MacDonald, a retired M.D. and board certified in Anatomic Pathology and Clinical Pathology. This revealing interview from May 2013 (1 of 3) covers many of the controversies associated with Lyme disease:
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[ 12-12-2018, 01:29 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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beaches
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Check out what the original poster posted.
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Keebler
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Phrased as a QUESTION, with "vocal inflection" of a question, with a question mark, even.

The poster even asks "correct?"

I'm hoping that the first reply clearly explains how that is not correct. Yet toxicity & inflammation is common to both, on a very different level.
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beaches
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All I know is if you are spiking a fever, get to the ER ASAP.
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Lymetoo
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From Keebler's link above:

"Septic shock is a severe condition, and more than 50 percent of cases will result in death (NHS). Your chances of surviving septic shock will depend on the source of the infection, how many organs have been affected, and how soon you received treatment after your symptoms began."

--------------------
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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Keebler
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Important to for us all to know, as we never know just when - when in the time of an hour or two - this detail could save a life:


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/families-warn-of-sudden-deadly-threat-of-sepsis/

Families warn of sudden, deadly threat of SEPSIS

By Ashley Welch - CBS News - Oct. 5, 2015

Excerpts:

. . . Sepsis is the body's overwhelming and life-threatening response to an infection which can lead to tissue damage, organ failure and death. It can happen to anyone with ANY TYPE OF INFECTION. Though most cases occur while patients are in the hospital, people can also acquire it in the community. . . .

. . . Symptoms of sepsis include the presence of an infection, as well of as at least two of the following symptoms: an elevated or lowered body temperature, a fast heart rate, a fast breathing rate and low blood pressure.

If caught early, sepsis is treatable with fluids and antibiotics. But it progresses quickly and if not treated, a patient's condition can deteriorate into severe sepsis, with an abrupt change in mental status, significantly decreased urine output, abdominal pain and difficulty breathing.

Septic shock occurs when someone has all of these symptoms plus extremely low blood pressure that doesn't respond to fluid replacement. . . .

. . . Once a patient has been identified as septic, "the gold standard to get the appropriate antibiotics to patients is one hour," Moore told CBS News.

But in most hospitals, "processes of care are just not in place to rapidly give needed treatment. We know that once you become septic, every hour delay that the appropriate antibiotics aren't given, the risk of morality increases."

Aiello said his daughter Emily had a 103-degree fever and rapid heart and breathing rates. "These are classic symptoms of sepsis, but they [the doctors] waited over 14 hours to take blood to test if she had an infection.

After that, it took another eight hours for the results to come back and another two hours to administer the antibiotics. A few hours later, she had coded. It was the most tragic day of my and my wife's life." . . .

[Full article at link above.]
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Keebler
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For those joining this link "late" and maybe not reading through ALL the explanations above --

just want to point out that lyme is not at all being equated to sepsis / septic shock [as the heading inquires]

Still, there is key detail here about both the herxheimer reaction / toxicity that goes with lyme and what we can do to address that lower degree of cytokine storm

and the very different - an absolutely urgent nature - of toxic levels & emergency cytokine storm of sepsis / toxic shock - that can arise from any kind of infection that gets out of hand.

Two key things in common of great value - best if on board before an emergency, of course:

GLUTATHIONE

MAGNESIUM

I really wish the article above had gotten into the fact that glutathione IVs may save lives for those experiencing sepsis. Of course, it's more complex than just that but the more we know now, the better.

What helps our bodies make glutathione:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=030792;p=0

LIVER & KIDNEY SUPPORT & and several HERXHEIMER support links, too.

[ 10-05-2015, 02:00 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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poppy
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I do think there is some similarity between sepsis and the herxheimer reaction. Some people have died from herxes, usually ones that never had any treatment for a severe case of lyme and were hit with aggressive treatment. In fact, I have kept an eye on progress in handling sepsis for that very reason.
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Keebler
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poppy,

Good points. Thanks for your thoughtful post. "similarity between sepsis and the herxheimer reaction."

Yes, a herxheimer - can be on a spectrum of "difficulty" or reaction in the body. Certainly, a herxheimer reaction can be very serious and, in some cases, fatal.

The Liver Support thread, hopefully, will stress the importance of not just addressing a herxheimer but how to help prevent it. Some LLMDs and LL NDs stress not being too aggressive with treatment that pushes too hard and trying to prevent a herxheimer. I think this is a very important consideration.


Key differences can be time & degree & type of infections. In true sepsis / septic shock EVERY MINUTE COUNTS and medical advice should be ASAP

Yeah, although it was very hard to properly articulate that in posts above -- I was struck by the similarities, too in some of the ways the body works . . . but the differences are also vital.

- most notably not just the blockages but what might help prevent either severe herx - or sepsis - if attention prompts action soon enough. I hope the posts above about those and steps to take will be of help at any stage.
-

[ 12-12-2018, 01:35 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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http://www.cbsnews.com/news/sepsis-deadly-infection-is-a-race-against-time/

SEPSIS: Deadly infection is a "race against time"

By Ashley Welch - CBS News - August 23, 2016

Five years ago, Dana Mirman noticed a small bump on her shoulder that she thought was an insect bite. Within 24 hours, her shoulder became extremely swollen, she was experiencing flu-like symptoms, and had a fever of 104 degrees.

Her husband brought her to the emergency room, where Mirman was quickly identified as a patient in septic shock.

The bump on her shoulder turned out to be an infection, which had become cellulitis (a bacterial infection of the skin and soft tissue) and then sepsis when the infection got into her bloodstream.

Having been perfectly healthy up until this point, she was shocked to learn her diagnosis. . . .
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bluelyme
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Technically , this infection is systemic and in my bloodstream. ..3 hospital cultures did not find bartonella ,borrielia or others ...this is interesting arguement

originally posted by lymed2010
https://vimeo.com/176804722

[ 08-28-2016, 03:03 AM: Message edited by: bluelyme ]

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Just for reference. Good to know in case information is ever needed.

Also important to know: avoid both acetaminophen and ibuprofen for either can make a cytokine ever worse by preventing - even blocking - the body from being able to handle it.

Acetaminophen blocks glutathione in the body; Ibuprofen constricts blood vessels. Refer to Liver / Kidney Support Links set for more detail on why this matters so much.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine_storm

CYTOKINE STORM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3368378/

Making Sense of the Cytokine Storm: a conceptual framework for understanding, diagnosing and treating hemophagocytic syndromes
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[ 09-24-2016, 03:54 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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“Recognition and treatment against sepsis is a race against time.”

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/uk-woman-mother-of-two-dies-of-sepsis-just-days-after-gardening-scratch/

UK woman dies of sepsis just days after gardening scratch

CBS News - Oct. 3, 2016

A scratch while gardening spiraled into a fatal bout of sepsis for a mother of two from the United Kingdom, her family says.

[The patient's] family, reported The Telegraph, said the 43-year-old went to see her doctor earlier this year due to pain in her shoulder that occurred shortly after she suffered a minor hand scrape while gardening.

The doctor diagnosed a trapped nerve and prescribed anti-depressants to relax her and she was also told to see a physiotherapist to help with rehabilitation of the so-called trapped nerve.

Within three days, [the patient's] fingers and arm became red and swollen, The Telegraph said.

She also was vomiting and had increased pain.

She saw a second doctor who thought she might have a blood clot and sent her to Basildon Hospital where a blood test revealed within 30 minutes that she had sepsis.

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening complication of an infection, according to Mayo Clinic experts.

[interjection: describes cytokine storm here]

It happens when chemicals released into the bloodstream to fight the infection trigger inflammatory responses throughout the body.

That process can lead to organ damage and failure.

Septic shock occurs when the person’s blood pressure drops dramatically, which may lead to death.

[The patient], a lawyer from Billericay, Essex, immediately received intravenous antibiotics and was moved to a critical care unit, but she suffered organ failure and died.

A CDC report released in August showed that in the U.S., for nearly 80 percent of patients, sepsis begins outside of the hospital.

But it is also linked to exposure to medical environments -- 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had recently used health care services or had chronic diseases requiring frequent medical care.

Anyone can develop sepsis but seniors and people with weaker immune systems are more vulnerable, say Mayo Clinic experts.

Early treatment of sepsis, usually with antibiotics and large amounts of intravenous fluids, improves chances for survival.

People should know the signs and immediately seek medical care if they notice these symptoms after developing an infection:

· Shivering, fever, or very cold

· Extreme pain or discomfort

· Clammy or sweaty skin

· Confusion or disorientation

· Shortness of breath

· High heart rate

At the CDC press briefing in August, CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, said his own son survived sepsis more than two decades ago.

“Helping patients to know to ask ‘Could this be sepsis?’ empowers them to potentially save their own or family members’ lives,” he said.

“Recognition and treatment against sepsis is a race against time.”

The most common infections that can lead to sepsis include lung infections, such as pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gut infection, and skin infection.
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[ 10-03-2016, 08:23 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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http://samples.jbpub.com/9781449604783/04783_CH07_PASS01.pdf

Fluid and Electrolyte Management - Chapter 7 in a 26-page pdf

Page 4, detail paragraph: Sepsis

[No apparent date in this learning document. The most recent source listed is from 2010.]

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=silver%2C+sepsis

PubMed Medical literature

silver, sepsis - 457 abstracts
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[ 03-10-2017, 07:22 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39219765

SEPSIS / Septic Shock

The biggest killer you may not know

By James Gallagher, BBC News - 10 March 2017

Excerpt:

. . . What is sepsis?

Sepsis is triggered by infections, but is actually a problem with our own immune system going into overdrive.

It starts with an infection that can come from anywhere - even a contaminated cut or insect bite.
Normally, your immune system kicks in to fight the infection and stop it spreading.

But if the infection manages to spread quickly round the body, then the immune system will launch a massive immune response to fight it.

This can also be a problem as the immune response can have catastrophic effects on the body, leading to septic shock, organ failure and even death.

In the UK, there are 44,000 deaths from the condition each year. . . .

[Full article at link above.]
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I think I had it following my gall bladder surgery in 2005. Eleven days later I woke up shivering and I had a very high fever and heart rate.

I spent 6 days in the hospital. They never could find the actual "source" of the infection .. but I knew it was related to the surgery. They probably knew it was also.

I was really really sick.

Quote from your Oct 3 post:

"But it is also linked to exposure to medical environments -- 7 in 10 patients with sepsis had recently used health care services or had chronic diseases requiring frequent medical care."

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oops!
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Excellent news (and an example of how both specific vitamins & a steroid can be partners to bring a good outcome in such emergency):

http://www.opb.org/news/article/npr-doctor-turns-up-possible-treatment-for-deadly-sepsis/

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

by Richard Harris NPR | March 24, 2017


http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/04/05/vitamin-c-b1-hydrocortisone-reduce-sepsis-mortality.aspx

Vitamin C, Vitamin B1(thiamine) and Hydrocortisone Dramatically Reduce Mortality From Sepsis

By Dr. Mercola - April 05, 2017

Extensive Article &

Full 14-min. video interview with Dr. Paul Marik
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I really urge everyone to read the two more recent articles - and the same news has been covered in various good news sources.

Because, we have to know all about this BEFORE we or a loved one might ever need to know about it. There is no time to learn in the middle of an emergency.

It's a good idea to educate those around us in all kinds of first aid and medical bits so they could think and talk calmly with doctors about the latest methods if such an emergency were to occur . . .

as well as things we can do for ourselves to try to avoid a full stop emergency -

- though always good to know those around would know how to recognize and how to act when minutes matter.
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Especially during flu season or with any infections that may cause a CYTOKINE STORE / CRISIS --

MAGNESIUM is very important to keep in mind if anyone you know is ever hospitalized. So are many of the articles above in this set.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26335852

Admission hypomagnesemia linked to septic shock in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

2015 - Ren Fail. 2015;37(9):1518-21.

Excerpt:

Conclusion: Patients with SIRS and hypoMg (<1.5 mg/dL) at the time of admission had increased risk of developing septic shock during hospitalization.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=123746;p=0

Topic: MAGNESIUM - Informational Links set
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[ 01-25-2018, 02:22 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Also related to septic shock, all women - and men - should keep in mind safe tampon use. Not, of course, that men use tampons but the middle school girls & women in men's families often do. Single fathers might be caught off guard but so can any parent or guardian figure.

A recent article this month about the continued - uh - I'm so out of steam . .. well, tampons with super absorb powers or any tampon that might be in place too long -- can quickly create toxic shock. Each to google. Please become aware.
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TOXIC SHOCK SYNDROME creates sepsis / septic shock

Yes, it is rare yet still vital to learn about it.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/12/19/this-model-lost-a-leg-because-of-an-infection-from-tampons-heres-what-she-wants-you-to-know/?utm_term=.7a03f7773e84

This model lost her leg because of toxic shock syndrome. Here's what she wants you to know.

By Lindsey Bever - The Washington Post - December 20, 2017

Excerpt:

. . . Wasser was on her period and using tampons in 2012 when she developed toxic shock syndrome. The rare but potentially fatal condition is typically caused by toxins from the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, or staph.

“Toxic shock syndrome has been associated primarily with the use of superabsorbent tampons,” according to the Mayo Clinic.

It “can progress rapidly,” the Mayo Clinic notes, advising: “Call your doctor immediately if you have signs or symptoms of toxic shock syndrome. This is especially important if you've recently used tampons or if you have a skin or wound infection.” . . . .


https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toxic-shock-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20355384

Mayo Clinic - Toxic Shock Syndrome Information page

Excerpts:

. . . Risk factors

Toxic shock syndrome can affect anyone. About half the cases of toxic shock syndrome associated with Staphylococci bacteria occur in women of menstruating age; the rest occur in older women, men and children.

Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurs in people of all ages.

Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with:

Having cuts or burns on your skin

Having had recent surgery

Using contraceptive sponges, diaphragms or superabsorbent tampons

Having a viral infection, such as the flu or chickenpox

Complications . . . .

Prevention . . . .
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https://www.simplemost.com/sepsis-deaths-teenagers/

Two More Young People Have Died From Sepsis — Here's What You Need To Know

Jan 15, 2018
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMULeO4sR3I

Natural versus synthetic vitamin C - Dr Suzanne Humphries

36 minutes

Synthetic L-Ascorbate Vitamin C - she stands by it in some circumstances - lives have been saved with this.
she gets no kick back from any recommendation

she is not at all okay saying Vitamin C HAS to be ONLY from natural / food sources. Synthetic has great value, if the right kind.

Non-GMO really matters
she recommends: NutriBIotic Sodium Ascorbate . . . . at VitaCost & iHerb, maybe Amzn
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a gene, called GSTM1, crucial to making and recycling glutathione


https://experiencelife.com/article/glutathione-the-great-protector/

Glutathione: The Great Protector

By Catherine Guthrie - April 2011

. . . In exploring what went wrong, Hyman discovered he lacked a gene, called GSTM1, crucial to making and recycling glutathione.

He estimates that roughly half of Americans are missing one or more of the genes necessary to produce enough of the antioxidant. . . .

. . . Cleanup Crew [this section explains how it works] . . . .

. . . Easy Ways to Maximize Glutathione Production and
Activity . . . .

. . . Toxin-Clearing Escort
Glutathione is concentrated in the liver, the body’s primary detox organ. Glutathione grabs hold of toxins in the liver and escorts them out along with the body’s waste products.

Too little glutathione?

Toxins accumulate in the body and can contribute to many inflammation-based diseases.

The Next-Best Things: Glutathione Precursors . . .
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glutathione_S-transferase_Mu_1

GSTM1 - Glutathione S-transferase Mu 1 (Human Gene)

Excerpts:

. . . The mu class of enzymes functions in the detoxification of electrophilic compounds, including carcinogens, therapeutic drugs, environmental toxins and products of oxidative stress, by conjugation with glutathione. . . .

. . . These genetic variations can change an individual's susceptibility to carcinogens and toxins as well as affect the toxicity and efficacy of certain drugs. . . .


For those who have had genetic testing, I crossed searched only for 23andMe. I have to stop it here, though. This is very complex. It would seem helpful to know if one has this or similar genetic variables if they have trouble with Rx, chemicals, illness that hit them harder.

A blurb from a Google search page.

Phase II detox – GSTs – - Genetic Lifehacks

https://www.geneticlifehacks.com/phase-ii-detox-gsts/

Jun 9, 2015 - GSTM1 has a very common (about half of some populations) mutation that is associated with little or no GSTM1 expression.

It can be found in 23andMe data through looking at

rs366631 which is a SNP that has been correlated with a deletion in GSTM1. [ref]

There are over 2500 PubMed entries for 'GSTM1 . . . .
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Berberine, potentially, might be of some help to lessen / modify / perhaps avoid a viral flu.

Talk to your doctor, of course, though. Better to have some kind of plan in place - just in case. And to learn how to know when / if the E.R. would required.

Now would be a good time to study / see one's MD &/or ND (naturopathic doctor) if possible to explore a comprehensive, individualized virus prevention / treatment options for each family member.


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30306659

Phytother Res. 2018 Oct 11. doi: 10.1002/ptr.6196. [Epub ahead of print]

Anti-influenza activity of berberine improves prognosis by reducing viral replication in mice.

[Ten authors from 4 medical university research institutions in China]

Abstract

Berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the berberis species, has a wide array of biological properties such as anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antihelminthic effects.

We evaluated the antiviral effect of berberine against influenza A/FM1/1/47 (H1N1) in vivo and in vitro.

The results showed that berberine strongly suppressed viral replication in A549 cells and in mouse lungs.

Meanwhile, berberine relieved pulmonary inflammation and reduced necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and pulmonary edema induced by viral infection in mice when compared with vehicle-treated mice.

Berberine suppressed the viral infection-induced up-regulation of TLR7 signaling pathway, such as TLR7, MyD88, and NF-κB (p65), at both the mRNA and protein levels.

Furthermore, berberine significantly inhibited the viral infection-induced increase in Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios as well as the production of inflammatory cytokines.

Our data provide new insight into the potential of berberine as a therapeutic agent for viral infection via its antiviral activity.


http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/121034

BERBERINE - Links set

Several posts for today - Dec. 4, 2018 - in reference to the flu & cytokine storm / cytokine cascade.
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--
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3294426/

Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 2012 Mar; 76(1): 16–32.

INTO THE EYE OF THE CYTOKINE STORM

[six authors listed at link]

Abstract:

Summary: The cytokine storm has captured the attention of the public and the scientific community alike, and while the general notion of an excessive or uncontrolled release of proinflammatory cytokines is well known,

the concept of a cytokine storm and the biological consequences of cytokine overproduction are not clearly defined.

Cytokine storms are associated with a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious diseases.

The term was popularized largely in the context of avian H5N1 influenza virus infection, bringing the term into popular media.

In this review, we focus on the cytokine storm in the context of virus infection,

and we highlight how high-throughput genomic methods are revealing the importance of the kinetics of cytokine gene expression and the remarkable degree of redundancy and overlap in cytokine signaling.


We also address evidence for and against the role of the cytokine storm in the pathology of clinical and infectious disease

and discuss why it has been so difficult to use knowledge of the cytokine storm and immunomodulatory therapies to improve the clinical outcomes for patients with severe acute infections.

[Full article, quite extensive & technical, with images at link above]
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https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/12/12/671287964/vitamin-treatment-for-sepsis-is-put-to-the-test

Vitamin Treatment For Sepsis Is Put To The Test

By Richard Harris - NPR - December 12, 2018

Heard on Morning Edition -

Audio Segment: 6:23 & Full article

Excerpt:

. . . “Hundreds of thousands of people die in the U.S. every year and millions of people in the world die of this,” says Sevransky, a critical-care physician at Emory University.

“So when somebody comes out with a potential treatment that is cheap and relatively easily available, it’s something you want to think about.” . . .
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Some new articles just posted above.

Sepsis cases always rise during flu season. I hope that anyone new to all this will read through all the articles posted above to learn all this now for all in your life .

If such a situation arises, there will be no time to then learn (or know if your particular hospitals offer the newest approach to treatments) - it is rather complicated.

Avoiding acetaminophen (it's in tylenol and many other OTC and Rx) is vital in potential prevention, too.. Posts above explain why (it blocks glutathione in all the cells and toxins are trapped in body to do harm).

& take care.
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