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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Low blood pressure

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Author Topic: Low blood pressure
purplehaze
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just wondering if other people have low blood pressure readings?
mine has consistently been on the low side [not extreme or critical]
I'm begging to think that it may be caused as a direct result of chronic infection - directly or indirectly

of course the reaction from most doctors is- "you're so damn lucky to have it low instead of high"
never for one second considering that there could be something more sinister going on

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me
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Yep, I almost always have low blood pressure.
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Lymetoo
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For sure... Moving this to medical questions..

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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tulips
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It is on my Symptom List and I have it too. Under Bartonella, it says, "A temperature under 98.3 in a sick person. A temperature under 99.0 if Lyme disease or Babesia is also present." I have Lyme, Bart and Babs. My temp when checked is always 97.
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kms1990
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This + POTS was one of my first real symptoms. I have gotten to points when my BP was 90/40. (not good).

This started to get a lot better after treatment with antibiotics for bartonella + adrenal support with Cortef and Fludrocortison.

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Keebler
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Check blood pressure regular way, then standing up. If standing, it drops, consider POTS, as kms mentions. POTs stands for postural (something, something, something. Google will know the term).

Similar to that is NMH (neutrally mediated hypotension).

Both are common to lyme / TBD due to the infections' effect on the various nervous systems, autonomic / sympathetic . . . and adrenal dysfunction, etc.

echoing kms's adrenal mention: yes, indeed . . . ADRENAL SUPPORT is the number one thing to be sure is in proper measure.

SEA SALT, see that in the adrenal book, etc. and how to use. A little bit in water, first thing in the morning. Talking here only about 1/8 teaspoon. Wilson has full detail in the book "Adrenal Fatigue"

HAWTHORN, an herbal heart support may also be excellent help. Detail in the Cardiac thread below on Hawthorn.

Avoid anything that pushes you or, in any way promises to "boost" energy. That can boomerang.

Some good detail here:

[ 04-09-2016, 04:04 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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To help with stable, measured endurance:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP & ADRENAL SUPPORT


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=034980;p=0#000000

LICORICE ROOT EXTRACT -- Informational Links set


http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/77325

CARDIAC Explanations & ENERGY SUPPORT, helping the Mitochonidria and myelin sheath. NMH / POTS detail here.

A "Tilt Table Test" can be performed but it may not be necessary (a lot can be done with a clinical assessment / symptom review by one's LLMD - most regular doctors will not understand the significance of this)

Talking with one's LLMD may be enough, unless the measures here don't help and the Rx Florinef might then be needed for extra help and then, having a tilt table test can provide more detail that other "regular" doctors might then pay more attention to.

For the most part, MANAGEMENT of this with adrenal support / caution when standing, etc. is what helps during treatment for lyme, other TBD (tick borne disease) or other stealth infections.

It's treating the infections that is key to resolution of the matter.
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Keebler
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Actually the place to START, excellent article here, and it includes "basic techniques to help me manage my NMH better::

http://www.wildcondor.com/backwards-blood-pressure.html

BACKWARDS BLOOK PRESSURE - by Laura Wild
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Keebler
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Some things I had to learn the hard way regarding NMH:

A can be very helpful, even if you don't lean on it to walk each step but have it at the ready just in case you take a dip. A bamboo cane is lighter than others for hands that may appreciate that.

As a pedestrian, do not - DO NOT STAND AT THE EDGE OF A CROSSWALK while waiting for the walk signal - or walk on the outer part of the sidewalk near traffic.

Walk as far away from moving vehicles, machines as you can so there is room to fall and roll, seriously. Take this in humor but know that it can save injury - or your life.

However, thinking of walking really near to buildings can also be tricky especially if one has a sharp startle reflex. My body has catapulted into store windows with the "burp" of someone locking their car, a horn, etc.

For balance, walking near the wall / or store fronts can be helpful but one other thing to watch out for is doors that open OUT. Many folks just bolt and the person in the street may see them if it's a glass door, but in a corridor, sometimes doors are solid.

Whatever methods you find for your safety, keep in mind all eventualities.
-

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WPinVA
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I was going to say what Keebler said in her first post, and she said it well!

Do you feel woozy when you stand/have trouble standing for long periods of time? Thermatabs can help there.

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sixgoofykids
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I had low blood pressure for many years. When I got healthy, my blood pressure became normal.

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sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

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purplehaze
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thank you all for the input/answers

WPinVA, yes there are times when I feel lightheaded, woozy if I was kneeling or crouched out for a while and then stand up

I had a hair mineral analysis done very recently and it showed high sodium so I'd be a bit hesitant in consuming any extra salts

my heart rate is also slow [Bradycardia] usually 55 to 58

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