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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Low ferritin. - Keebler, are you out there?

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Author Topic: Low ferritin. - Keebler, are you out there?
Nula
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Hi Keebler,

Hope you're doing okay (whatever 'okay' means in the Lyme world :-).

You've previously suggested stinging nettle leaf to raise ferritin levels.

Did you take a powder? Tea? Capsules? I'm sure the info is somewhere - just can't find it right now.

Thanks so much!

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I appreciate all your replies. If it takes me a while to respond, it is either because I'm too sick or because I am unable to log in. From European servers, Lymenet is very frequently inaccessible for days at a time ...

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steve1906
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Nula,

Until Keebler replies, here's a post she started on Nov - 2012 / ended on Sep - 2018.

Topic: STINGING NETTLE LEAF - Links set

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=031228;p=0

Steve

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Everything I say is just my opinion!

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Keebler
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Steve,

I love that you do this from time to time - very often I just don't have the energy or vestibular steadiness to answer even simple ?s.

It's a big help, so thanks (& bunch of flowers to you)!

For everyone, if you have a question about anything, you might search for what others have previously posted. You can check either General or Medical forums, in the subject line to get better search results.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/ubb/search

Search for past threads
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Keebler
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Nula,

Very good questions. Good that you ask.

Tea? No - I do not think it's strong enough. You need a medicinal calculation. If you use powder, it will not dissolve like a tea - and really, as you are using the LEAF, hot water should NEVER be used for any plant parts above ground. It can cancel out their properties.

Only for roots, can hot water be used for herbs -- and you do not want the root part of this as that has entirely different properties and will not help with what you want this for.


Capsules? Best, especially at first. You can open one up later on, mix in water and see how you do with the taste.

Powder?

Be certain there are no additives.

Some powders can taste - well, like Goldilock's porridge experiments. I have found that some powders I simply could not tolerate due to the bitterness -- no fault of the herb as often a bitter herb has great properties.

Stinging nettle powder - in my experience - from Mountain Rose Herbs in Eugene, OR -- that powder taste is okay - not delightful but also not harsh though it might irritate lips that are sensitive so if you use that or any powder

after drinking, be sure to rinse out mouth and rinse off lips.

If your order powder - ask for a couple GRAM SPOONS so you can calculate exact dosage. They are tiny, approx. 1/4 teaspoon yet that is not exact for measuring.

Also keep in mind that powders sometimes don't dissipate in water great so be careful not to breath in as you drink it down if some powder clumps come to surface.

When it first arrives in a packet, carefully (so as not to breath the fine powder) put in a clean, dry jar (dark preferred but still keep it out of the light and the lid tightly closed).

The taste, while not awful and mostly neutral to my taste - the effort of mixing in water might keep you from a steady schedule of taking this.

For you, to start, I suggest capsules if you can (though powder is less expensive - be sure to only get from Mountain Rose Herbs - or other top notch source)

Capsule brands I have done well with: at first used ECLECTIC INSTITUTE'S

other times: Oregon's Wild Harvest -- or Mountain Rose Herbs might also make capsules.

hope this helps. Be sure to read all the articles, links, etc. I really hope you can do that, too.
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Nula
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Thanks so much, Steve, I'll read the links! :-)

Keebler, I truly appreciate your quick and very helpful response! Will give the capsules a shot!

Have a lovely Sunday :-)

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I appreciate all your replies. If it takes me a while to respond, it is either because I'm too sick or because I am unable to log in. From European servers, Lymenet is very frequently inaccessible for days at a time ...

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Keebler
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A lovely day to you, as well.

Pardon me if you eat only plant food. I can't recall and may be confusing your name with another who is.

In a lecture I saw just last night, Dr. Georgia Ede has a great chart showing the benefits of iron from meat vs. just plants.

Though, stinging nettle leaf capsule are more condensed plant food with particular properties, still, it might be worth it to look as to if you get enough read meat in your diet (if you eat meat).

I'll post that link later.

Red meat - beef, lamb, etc. (from good sources / grass-fed) is also important source of iron nutrients. Be sure to get it from various sources as they are not all equal & can complement each other in the body, too.

Liver, as well, is important for the diet (again, from organic pastured chickens or grass-pastured beef.)
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Keebler
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She, herself, has found that her stomach (actually her whole body) has trouble with vegetables and she does better eating mostly meat & fats.

However, that degree of limiting plants is not what she suggests for everyone, just that avoiding simple carbs might not work for everyone and that, for some, skipping meat can have rough consequences.

Although the term ketogenic / low carb is a main focus, even for those not going so low in carbs, the nutrition in meat - and in animal fat - is key for others, too.

She had to study intensely the nutrients in meat to be sure she's covered. What she shares can help others even when various food plans are involved.

I've watched several of her presentations over this past year - I think this is the one with the great charts --

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXlVfwJ6RQU

Dr. Georgia Ede - 'Our Descent into Madness: Modern Diets and the Global Mental Health Crisis'

32:55 - Feb. 2018 at Low Carb Down Under / Breckenridge


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HtR-fvup9Qc

Interview with Psychiatrist and Ketogenic Nutrition Consultant, Dr. Georgia Ede

28:17 - Dec 20, 2018
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[ 01-13-2019, 04:02 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Nula
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Hi Keebler,

Thanks so much. I do eat meat, but it hasn't helped my ferritin levels so far. Not even eating liver. I have SIBO and various other digestive issues. The main issue seems to be an iron absorption problem.


Also, there are so many things I can't eat ...

Lately, I've been dealing with massive acid reflux, which may be related to low stomach acid. Though I don't know, since I can't find anyone to test my stomach acid.

In any case, while my gut seems to be fine with meat, my stomach doesn't seem to like it and I get even more reflux. I presume I have an issue with protein digestion, which would - again - lead me to the idea of low stomach acid.

I've tried the SIBO, the FODMAP, the GAPS diets ... You name it, I've tried it. The FODMAP diet works for my SIBO, but again, there are things I can't eat due to stomach burning and acid reflux.

There are a million vegetables I can't eat. So it's really hard to raise my iron levels via plant-based foods or even meat.

I've tried about all iron pills out there. They do boost my ferritin levels slightly, but I don't tolerate them for longer than a few weeks (at which point my SIBO usually acts up).

I'm pondering iron injections to treat my low ferritin. Though I'm still researching this topic. I just recently read a post on here by a user who reacted badly to iron injections.

I have Babesia duncani, which is likely responsible for most of my many, many symptoms (including my low ferritin levels).

In summary: my stomach likes veggies (less stomach burning/acid reflux), but my small intestine hates veggies (bloating, diarrhea).

Meanwhile, my stomach hates meat (massive reflux), but my small intestine seems to be fine with it (no bloating etc.).

I'll watch the videos you sent me. Thank you SO much.

--------------------
I appreciate all your replies. If it takes me a while to respond, it is either because I'm too sick or because I am unable to log in. From European servers, Lymenet is very frequently inaccessible for days at a time ...

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Keebler
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Please avoid injection of iron substances. Please.

With Babesia, you are likely going to have this issue until the Babesia is better. Give stinging nettle some time to work but also cover all your bases.

Continue with "Happy" good beef & lamb. "Happy" Eggs

Chicken is not as nutrient dense. You might try a couple days with no fruits/ veggies (or veggie juices, either) and see if that helps your gut.

On those days, maybe some mushroom broth (not packaged, of course) and some chlorella &/or spirulina -- technically,. these are not plants yet provide key nutrients.

L. Amber O'Hearn has a great presentation on what plants can do to some guts that are "leaky" - KetoFest 2018 lecture with great slides.

She also has a wonderful conversation with Dr. Bret Scher at DietDoctor Podcast just the past couple days - both at YouTube, too.

Mushrooms, technically, are not plants, either. I have more to learn as to if they affect the gut lining as plants can irritate . . . but they add such flavor that while I'm testing the waters I can't give up that flavor of the broth from them, at least.

I don't know what Amber would say to my "test" approach but I'm just beginning to study her plant-free diet presentation.

I've been on a ketogenic diet for 8 months now so my body is more ready to try this approach since I still have major gut pain & veggie bloating and it could be from the vegetables, I ponder -- just meat and fat seems much better for my gut for a little rest.

I do not at all suggest others to just jump into this yet there may be some elimination things that anyone could test out for themselves. I've been aware of her approach for months - in the midst of all the keto lectures I've seen.

[Segue needed here -- too many interjected after thoughts. ]

Avoid pepper and all spices for those days. Avoid garlic, onions, too (boo-hoo!). The thing about spices is they can make worse a leaky gut.

Avoid all plant oils, even Olive Oil. Use Ghee, Tallow, Lard (if sourced from free range, pastured animals or fatty cuts of meat (again, good sourced).

A good sea Salt required, though, of course.

I've found just two days of this my gut is feeling better. Just testing this out a bit. The mushroom broth & green powder just my own idea to give stomach a rest.

Meat is actually often easier to digest than plant material -especially cruciferious (?) veg. Though slow roast meat for tenderness and I add in some bone broth, too.

Maybe just try this a couple days to see if it helps your gut.

I hope you are able to treat the babesia in a direct manner, too.
That has to be done. somehow, assertively. Babesia can really clobber the red blood cells and that makes fatigue - and other things - so much more profound.

Good luck, whatever approaches you consider.
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[ 01-16-2019, 07:24 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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Be sure your diet is very LOW OXALATE - no more than 50 per day as per Sally K. Norton, MPH.
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