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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Anyone tried dry needling for pain?

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Author Topic: Anyone tried dry needling for pain?
hiker53
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I have a rotator cuff injury.

The physical therapist suggested dry needling, but he wasn't sure if I should try it having had Lyme.

Has anyone tried dry needling for muscle pain?

If so, did it help?

And me, being a scaredy cat, did it hurt? [Eek!]

Thanks.

--------------------
Hiker53

"God is light. In Him there is no
darkness." 1John 1:5

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Keebler
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Is this a form / method of acupuncture / acupressure on specific acu-points?

Some PTs and MDs take short courses in this sort of thing yet someone who has the full 3-year formal training in acupuncture might be best to ask about whatever this might be.

They would be more equipped to know the full body acupuncture meridian paths so that the tender shoulder, itself, would not have to be even touched.
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Keebler
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Myself, I would never do this.

A low oxalate diet has been said to help some with shoulder pain as you describe (along with resting the injured tissue).

Oxalates are in various vegetables and are sharp crystals that - for some - build up and can deposit anywhere in the body, anywhere. Spinach, certain kale & other greens, some nuts especially almonds are just some of the high oxalate foods.

More: search presentations by: Sally K. Norton

Acupuncture, acupressure techniques, myofascial release by someone trained in that technique (such as "John Barnes" method), Feldenkrais movement therapy, Upledger cranial-sacral manipulation (that does the full skeleton) are all other avenues that I would first consider.

There are so many reasons why, to me, this seems like a short cut to acupuncture without taking into account all the variables of the full meridian / nerve / "chi" pathways.

For instance, a well educated and experienced acupuncturist (or other good practitioners) might not at all want to stimulate such tender, irritated or damaged tissue.

They would approach it without further posing risk of more irritation or stress. With acupuncture, there are various points other than in the injured spot that can be used and relate back to the place that needs to be left alone.


https://www.moveforwardpt.com/Resources/Detail/dry-needling-by-physical-therapist-what-you-should

Dry Needling by a Physical Therapist: What You Should Know?

Excerpt:

Dry needling is a technique physical therapists use (where allowed by state law) for the treatment of pain and movement impairments.

The technique uses a "dry"needle, one without medication or injection, inserted through the skin into areas of the muscle.

Other terms commonly used to describe dry needling, include trigger point dry needling, and intramuscular manual therapy.

Dry needling is not acupuncture, a practice based on traditional Chinese medicine and performed by acupuncturists. Dry needling is a part of modern Western medicine principles, and supported by research 1.

What is a Trigger Point?

A trigger point is a taut band of skeletal muscle located within a larger muscle group. Trigger points can be tender to the touch, and touching a trigger point may cause pain to other parts of the body.

What Kind of Needles Are Used?

Dry needling involves a thin filiform needle that penetrates the skin and stimulates underlying myofascial trigger points and muscular and connective tissues.

The needle allows a physical therapist to target tissues that are not manually palpable.

Physical therapists wear gloves and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) when dry needling, consistent with Standard Precautions,

Guide to Infection Prevention for Outpatient Settings, and OSHA standards. The sterile needles are disposed of in a medical sharps collector.

Why Dry Needling? . . . .
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[ 02-09-2019, 05:18 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Lymetoo
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Yes, it hurts .. and it didn't really do anything for me.

Acupuncture was a lot more effective for my situation. (and lowering oxalates)

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oops!
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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Keebler
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This chart is from a kidney health site - however, in some people, oxalates can go anywhere in the body to cause damage, especially for those who have "leaky gut"

I know that in at least two of her lectures I've recently seen, rotator cuff / shoulder issues have been mentioned twice and both times the person reporting that got better from low oxalate diet in addition to letting the shoulder rest / no aggressive movement.

What can help, too: Magnesium Citrate especially (and maybe for some also Calcium Citrate & Potassium Citrate but K is often very tricky. Avocados are the best source for K and Avos are low-oxalate, too (yippee!)

In addition to various presentations at YouTube (search there for: Sally K. Norton, oxalates) . . .

I just stumbled upon this really great color coded chart - nine pages of foods in High, Med, and Low range:

http://www.urinarystones.info/resources/Docs/Oxalate-content-of-food-2008.pdf

Oxalate content of Food
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Lymetoo
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Also biotin can help, as can D-Calcium Glucarate .. (oxalates)

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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terv
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I have lots of knots in my neck and traps. I did the dry needling a few years ago. It gave very temporary relief. Yes it hurt but for some reason I love pain when it has to do with the knots.

I also did acupuncture for the knots. I first started with the needles which helped. Then I went to the dry cupping which helped more. Finally wet cupping (where blood comes out). I loved it all. There might have been some pain but I like pain.

Unfortunately none of the acupuncture treatments would last so I stopped. The acupuncturist was trying so hard and it was like beating a dead horse.

Personally I would go for the acupuncture.

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hiker53
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Thanks for all of your responses!

--------------------
Hiker53

"God is light. In Him there is no
darkness." 1John 1:5

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terv
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After years of PT for shoulder, traps and neck I tried 6 months of cranial osteo (cost me a fortune). Then I tried acupuncture. Finally I am doing a new type of PT. It is postural restoration therapy.

I love it and is helping. According to therapist my whole body was stuck together. Now my right hip has rotated forward to match my left. My uber expensive osteo guy couldnt do that.

I can now make my lower abdominal muscles blow up a balloon - that neurogical path was broken.

Lots of neurological paths that were broken from lyme are slowing being rebuilt.

It is even kind of meditative because I used diaphragmatic breathing all the time.

https://www.posturalrestoration.com/

There are youtube videos on it also.

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