LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter



Tax deductible

The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.
In the United States, your donations are tax deductible.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Tafenoquine for Babesia?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Tafenoquine for Babesia?
Charles12
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 24729

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles12     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It's finally been approved by the FDA. Has anyone tried it?

There's a study on Pubmed from 1997 that concluded it was very effective against Babesia, and New York Medical College is doing a Babesia study with it.

Posts: 100 | From Virginia | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Hmmm. Nice to hear of some investigation for babesia.

I've not tried it though it does pique my interest. Just passing along some links for those wondering more.

The study link, itself, would be good to see, too. Hope they consider more than just one dose or even just three as babesia can be so hard to eradicate. I'm wary of short doses that are supposed to make the world right again. Still, starter links:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tafenoquine

Tafenoquine

Excerpt:

. . . Like primaquine, tafenoquine causes hemolysis in people with G6PD deficiency.[2]

Indeed, the long half-life of tafenoquine suggests that particular care should be taken to ensure that individuals with severe G6PD deficiency do not receive the drug.

The dose of tafenoquine has not been firmly established, but for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria, a dose of 800 mg over three days has been used.[5]

In 2018 United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved single dose tafenoquine for the radical cure (prevention of relapse) of Plasmodium vivax malaria[6]. . . .


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose-6-phosphate_dehydrogenase_deficiency

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

[paraphrased] . . . anyone who considers certain kinds of higher / IV Vitamin C therapy also needs to first rule out G6PD deficiency . . . .
-

Posts: 47842 | From Tranquil Tree House in my dreams | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I thought I might look up the study but ran out of steam. Quite a few links pop up in this search at Google for:

Babesia, Tafenoquine "New York Medical College"
-

Posts: 47842 | From Tranquil Tree House in my dreams | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Charles12
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 24729

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles12     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It’s scheduled for release in 2021, if I remember correctly.

There’s a study on pub med, dating back to 1997, when it was still an experimental compound. It was the most effective substance tested.

Posts: 100 | From Virginia | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler         Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
-

Posts: 47842 | From Tranquil Tree House in my dreams | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Charles12
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 24729

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles12     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
There are two formulations. One is a low dose designed to be taken over several days if you’re traveling through Malaria country.

The other, Krintafel, is sold as two pills, and is used a single dose cure for people who already have Malaria.

There is no dosing guideline for Babesia. Although a study is under way.

-

It clearly works, I feel better, but it seems unlikely that taking two pills, once, would put Babesia into remission.

One more thing, the pharmacy had to order it through Anda which is a speciality supplier. Cost was 55 without insurance.

Posts: 100 | From Virginia | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dan455
Member
Member # 51881

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Dan455     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Charles12:


It clearly works, I feel better, but it seems unlikely that taking two pills, once, would put Babesia into remission.

One more thing, the pharmacy had to order it through Anda which is a speciality supplier. Cost was 55 without insurance.

Wow, I'm blown away that a LLMD would even try prescribing it, you have to be one of the first lyme patients to ever receive treatment with Tafenoquine.

NPR wrote an article explaining the only drug that's similar to Tafenoquine is Primaquine, which they both target the resistant form of malaria in the liver. It's very much possible that Babesia could also have a strain that has a dormant form in the liver, so something like Tafenoquine could be very valuable to lyme patients.
https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/26/631922706/new-drug-wipes-out-malaria-in-a-single-dose-but-theres-one-hitch

I know I had a lot of success with rotating between coartem and primaquine, but I'd never do it again due to the side effects suffering from the lyme seizures and psychiatric effects from this protocol, I ended up in the hospital. But I feel primaquine was the first antiparasitic to really knock back the Babesia infection quite well for me.

I also used Stevia to erradicate the biofilms as well with primaquine... I know Dr. J in DC uses xylitol and lactoferrin with his antiparasitic drugs for Babesia. Biofilms could be a major problem why Tafenoquine didn't put your Babesia in remission.

After 8 years of antibiotics and antiparasitics, I decided to go strictly down the herbal route.

I've even tried Disulfiram, which a new study is suggesting could be the cure for lyme, 2 out of 3 patients getting cured from babesia/borrelia infection.
https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6382/8/2/72

I've made some huge strides with these drugs, but there comes to a point where you can tolerate so much side effects from these drugs, that you want to just switch to something else less harmful.

NPR even reporting that Tafenoquine can have some extreme side effects where the drug causes red blood cells to burst open and die, which can be lethal for some patients. Sucks, I guess there's always a catch.

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/26/631922706/new-drug-wipes-out-malaria-in-a-single-dose-but-theres-one-hitch

quote:
Originally posted by NPR:
In certain people, tafenoquine can cause red blood cells to burst open and die. As a result, people can become anemic, and in some instances, this can be lethal.

I only took Disulfiram for 3-4 weeks before I couldn't tolerate the fatigue and psychiatric effects from the drug, remind you I was treating with this drug by myself without doctor supervision, so I quit. But I suspect Disulfiram could be a lot safer.

And really, I never treated Babesia effectively because of the poor LLMDs in my home stage Michigan. They aren't educated in handling this coinfection at all.

One of the first improvements I made treating Lyme as a whole when it was the 3rd year in treatment with a new LLMD in Saginaw that he used flagyl+zithromax+malarone. Sad to say, the LLMD claimed Babesia only need to be treated for 2-3 months and that's it. And what's scary is he had a ILADS certificiate in his office.

So for many years, I thought I was done treating Babesia, until I listened to what more lyme patients were saying on the forums, how it can take up to 6-12+ months or more to reach remission with this coinfection.

And after seeing the new Yale study, showing that most antiparasitic drugs are inadequate in treating this parasite, that tells you something.
https://news.yale.edu/2018/11/29/yale-scientists-develop-new-system-study-emerging-tickborne-disease

quote:
Originally posted by Charles12:

They also tested four current drugs that are used to treat the disease and found that the parasite has low susceptibility to these therapies.

It's very scary considering I think most LLMDs aren't educated in handling this parasite/coinfection of lyme and that most antiparsitic drugs don't work effectively against it.

Probably a major reason why lyme patients stay chronic, along with borrelia persister cells, biofilms, and other coinfections like bartonella, mycoplasma, and possibly rickettsia.

[ 07-01-2019, 07:34 PM: Message edited by: Dan455 ]

Posts: 26 | From MI | Registered: Apr 2019  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Charles12
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 24729

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles12     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
NPR even reporting that Tafenoquine can have some extreme side effects where the drug causes red blood cells to burst open and die, which can be lethal for some patients. Sucks, I guess there's always a catch.
It’s caused by a genetic disorder, G6PDD, that’s more common in Malaria zones. G6PDD is like sickle cell, in that it provides some protection against malaria, which is why people carry it.

-

I’m a believer in Tafenoquine.

The literature says it works the best out of any of our medical therapies. And in my own experience over the last few days, it’s the only intervention that’s really made a dramatic difference. And it worked immediately.

If you have Babesia, I would talk to your doctor.

The second formulation Arakoda might be the best option though. It looks like they tested it for periods of up to six months at a time. It’s exactly the same drug, with different dosing, and packaged differently.

In my own case taking two pills has made a massive difference, the drug has a 14 day half life, but who knows, longer term treatment might be required. And that’s what I mean by putting it into remission. There’s just no data, so we don’t know how long to take it. Maybe two pills is all anyone needs. Maybe it’s two months of treatment.

Posts: 100 | From Virginia | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Charles12
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 24729

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles12     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Wow, I'm blown away that a LLMD would even try prescribing it, you have to be one of the first lyme patients to ever receive treatment with Tafenoquine.
I showed him some of the recent literature.

He was willing to experiment.

I also don’t have a history of dramatic herxes.

Posts: 100 | From Virginia | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Newday
Junior Member
Member # 35868

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Newday     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Charles12 -Have you taken Tafenoquine and/or Antabuse? If you took both, can you compare your reactions and results? My doctor is willing to prescribe either one and is recommending Tafenoquine. He did the genetic test and there's no problem with me taking it.
Posts: 9 | From Maryland | Registered: Jan 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Charles12
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 24729

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles12     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
TQ works, but there are no dosing guidelines for Babesia yet. Your best bet would be to takes the Arakoda formulation, in the absence of other information.

Antabuse has been shown to kill malaria, and I’ve experienced the symptoms of Babesia die off while taking it.

To answer your question directly. I could be taking either Antabuse or TQ right now, but I’m taking Antabuse.

Posts: 100 | From Virginia | Registered: Mar 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

© 1993-2019 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to the Terms and Conditions.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


Home | Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Webmaster