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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » diabetes . from autoimmmune/lyme? Finding an endocrinologist

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Author Topic: diabetes . from autoimmmune/lyme? Finding an endocrinologist
LisaK
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I am having diabetes sx. finally figured this out. giong to get a tester and check my blood sugar I guess, throughout day/night to see what its diong.

anyone know anything about this coming after having lyme, etc? I read other autoimmune can trigger, but didn't see anything about tick diseases causing.

and how do I find a good endocrinologist? is there a database of some sort? I want someone who is good at dx since if it's not diabetes then what can I do about al this blood sugar rollercoaster? I have so many dietary restrictions already I am giong nuts!

--------------------
"The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."

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Keebler
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Lisa,

I'm terrible at using my words and I do have some excellent links for you. But, first, my condolences on the recent loss of your mother. Some of your recent posts indicate that your life is a bit topsy turvy right now, understandably so.

As for your questions regarding possible insulin surges from glucose highs - and possible diabetes, hold on a bit.

The first step for anyone new to this would not be to see an endocrinologist. Not at all.

Your PCP can do what's call an hbA1c, or just A1c. That determines, roughly, what the past few months glucose stored in your red blood cells. It looks for the average.

Not a perfect test for someone who might surge and then crash with sugar and the resultant insulin surge that always follows more than just a little sugar.

Still, the A1c is essential to see part of the picture. But just as important is what your insulin is doing.

Might you be insulin resistant? Pre-diabetic?

As for diabetes, most adults who develop diabetes, it's T2D, (type 2). Yet, some research now finds that actually, Type 1 D can also come on later.

For anyone who has high blood glucose readings and who might be diagnosed with diabetes, then, perhaps if your PCP can't determine for certain which type,

then an endocrinologist might be in order IF they take this seriously and don't assume it's just T2D.

T1D and T2D are very different in many ways. They cannot be treated the same.

A Kraft 7-hour insulin test is the best but few doctors even know about that or how to do it. And insurance might not pay.

There are shorter versions of it. But, really, I would never recommend a glucose tolerance test where you'd drink 75 grams of pure glucose UNLESS, they would then ALSO check INSULIN. And if your insurance would also cover it.

That 75 grams of pure glucose (and maybe added colors, etc.?) is not worth the damage it can cause unless you also get the insulin test with it.

Otherwise, a home glucose meter can tell you LOTS about how certain foods work - or do not work - in your body. Then just avoid foods that raise blood glucose more than just a bit. If that keeps you in a safe range, great.

Links below detail what to ask your doctor and also what you can do for yourself.

Sometimes a CRP (C-Reactive Protein test) can give a clue to insulin highs yet as that also indicated inflammation, lyme can complicate.

Insulin, itself, though is very inflammatory. If it's high for some with lyme, getting glucose & insulin down is likely to offer much relief, though, even if other things are going on.

I'm so out of steam now. Others can explain much better.

Keep this window open and then open a new window to search. Or print out this post for reference as you search.

Keep it handy for ongoing education.

Start here: HOW TO SEARCH - your TEMPLATE

www.diabetes.co.uk

Terms

YouTube search: " diabetes" [later change search to "insulin" again, with each name]

[later, pop in other terms such as cholesterol, fats, etc. that might come to your mind]

Names

[then pop in each name for different searches:

Dr. Berg . . . Dr. Ken Berry . . . Dr. Eric Westman . . . Dr. Sarah Hallberg . . . Virta Health . . .

Dr. David Unwin (in the UK, amazing talks)

Dr. Richard Bernstein, too, has great detail and a book.

They each have good presentations that can offer ways to

manage, control, and possibly - often, even - reverse diabetes, Type 2.

And better manage / control Type 1 often with careful monitoring.

Their work / plans can help with Type 1 patients, too, yet that is much more complex and most certainly requires a top doc. T1D always requires the use of insulin because the body cannot make it.

Autoimmune issues are more prominent with T1D than with T2D, though there is often still some autoimmune concern but the pancreas is still working to make some insulin -- or it's just pushing out a huge dangerous amount with T2D .

Hope this offers you a place to begin.

In most cases, T2D is totally brought on by the body's inablity to handle carbohydrates in excess. That excess can vary from person to person.

Food changes can often reverse T2D.

An affordable blood glucose home monitor is Diathrive. See their website.

I got one a few months ago and had some questions about it but they sent me a new one and it appears to be working okay.

It's not at the top of my list of good ones but at least it's relative if you can't afford the other kinds.

Fasting blood glucose - check AFTER a full 12 hour overnight fast. A little longer is better but until that 12 hour mark has passed there could be a false reading called the "dawn effect"
For food glucose reaction testing:

Check your glucose 30 minutes, 60 minutes and 2 hours after meals - take notes and then you can see your reaction to certain foods. Then you can eliminate foods that are too high for you.

Meat, fish & fat will not raise glucose so when you test at home, keep in mind it's the carbohydrate part of your meal that you are monitoring the glucose reaction to.

When you get an A1c test with your PCP, if you do have high numbers, you might be able to get a glucose meter with insurance. Otherwise, most strips are very expensive.

No A1c test, though, can test what certain foods do to you. A home meter is required to figure that out.

That's where I suggest the Diatrive model / strips for their affordability. No prescription is required for any glucose meter in the U.S.

In the meantime, as you study a bit on this, you might consider going lower on carbs that turn to sugar in the body, even if "whole" - grains, beans, fruits, and any processed foods.

Just be more mindful as to smaller serving sizes and watch glucose readings in response.

If you consume dark chocolate, one ounce of over 90% can work after a meal, not alone.

Be sure to get good protein, non-starchy veggies (best low oxalate, though), and real fat including butter from grass fed / pastured cows. Meat matters, too and lean toward grass fed with possible or at least know where it comes from). Fatty cuts are best.

Salmon, sardines for the Omega-3.

Eggs are normally excellent, too, and best with pastured.

Avoid all SEED OILs and "vegetable oils" -- search Nina Teicholz, Vegetable Oil for her work on the toxicity of these things.

Olive oil is the only "vegetable" oil that's good but be sure it's from a reputable source. Avocado oil, okay, too. But not canola, corn, etc.

Setting aside any fear, I hope you can enjoy the presentations and feel more in control. Diabetes can be a scary word. There is so much we can do to prevent, avoid and even reverse that in most cases. So much.

All that might see very complicated at first yet try to KISS - keep it simple, Sweetie.

Good sources - real food - from animal protein & fats -- & clean fish proteins . . . veggies mostly from above the ground are the main attractions that are our helpers.

Take care.
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[ 06-01-2019, 01:44 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_qiM1ZXbPY

Are you an UNdiagnosed Diabetic? (You Deserve the Correct Lab Tests)

Dr. Ken D. Berry - Aug 2018 - 9:33 video


https://www.youtube.com/user/KenDBerry/featured

Dr. Ken D. Berry - The Berry Clinic - YouTube channel


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeGz0VKEGv0

HbA1c Test and What HbA1c Normal Range Means

Dr. Sten Ekberg - Nov. 2018 - 15:17 video


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLmxcuAfOxw

The Most Accurate Method to Determine Your Blood Sugar is Not A1C

Dr. Eric Berg discusses the importance of after meal testing

Feb. 2019 - 8:03 minutes
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Keebler
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https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmKsQWqGmDPIWgrVqGYbc3w/about

Dennis Pollock shares his own story of how he overcame diabetes and runaway blood sugar, and some of the keys he learned along the way.


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmKsQWqGmDPIWgrVqGYbc3w

Beat Diabetes! YouTube channel

He's done dozens of blood sugar tests on certain foods, comparing in day by day videos. Some of the testing, his wife also tests and since she does not have insulin resistance as does he, her tests results are usually in the good zone.

Since his body does not deal with carbohydrates well, his tests often show just how that can zoom out of range. And he usually offers a safer alternative the next day and then shows the glucose tests with that.
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Keebler
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Used in the Duke Univ. clinic of Dr. Eric Westman, a low carbohydrate / ketogenic diet re: insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, diabetes, etc.

Very similar to the food plan used by Dr. Sarah Hallberg at Indiana University / Virta Health. Will post those links later

5-page pdf

https://www.dietdoctor.com/se/wp-content/2014/10/no_sugar_no_starch_diet.pdf

Lifestyle Medicine Clinic - Duke University Medical Center

This diet is found in the appendix of the book "Why We Get Fat" by Gary Taubes and is an example of a low carbohydrate diet.

"No Sugar, No Starch Diet" Getting Started: . . . .


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_bdziQZS98

How To Go Keto The Easy Way — Dr. Eric Westman [Tips And Tricks]

17:10 video - May 31, 2019 - Adapt Your Life (Dr. W's reach-out video format)
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LisaK
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thanks KEEBS!!

wow that is a lot. I stil lhave trouble reading and digesting what I have read , so this will challenge, me, but I nkow it will help, thank you.

I know a huge problem- I keep forgetting about!!!- is how moldy my house is. I went away to see my dad and came home and was ill within seconds. its so very very discouraging.

we want to move, but our house is a mess. - whole other long story----

im trying to deal with house mold best I can. no support from my people though, so it is tough since I forget things all the time.

but seeing improvements for sure albeit slowly.
I get an "attack" every time I eat. when I do eat carbs of any kind it is a bigger attack.

I can no longer eat so much foods because of the high oxcalates they found in my urine test. so I am really hating my life right now as far as food goes. I love food. wah wah wah....

any way, I asked my friend the name of her endocrine dr and she said same as you- to first buy a monitor. so I did.
My fasting levels are almost always over 100.
Of course the machine could be off?

I wasn't sure what a non diabetic level should be so I searched. all the sites say 60-100.
I was thinking I will check with my PCP. ugh wish I never went. All I did what call and ASK them what is normal and they made me go in for apt.

I just got home and I am fuming, once again. I think I will write a thread in general on that one....

so he told me to get the test you said. A1c so I am gong to do that tomorrow. fasting. hopefully it will say something! I don't' even care at this point what anything can be- I just want it to be fixed. I am so tired of feeling this way.

ok, sorry for being emotional.

the tests I have done with the monitor have consistently showed this hi-ish level. yesterday I was ill and didnt eat al lday til dinner and every check was high. like 110-119.
this dr today said to cut out carbs and lose weight, blah blah, blah, but even when I am less weight I still got these attacks

--------------------
"The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."

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Keebler
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110 - 119 if fasting is not too bad if you ate prior. Also consider pre-diabetes as that might be more likely. Still the same approach with low-carb diet, though, and that's good news.

Wait for the A1c results, sure - still use your glucometer AFTER meals to figure out best foods..

Yet, as you say you did not eat all day. Oh, please eat. It's important to eat, my dear. Stress from not eating can cause blood sugar to rise.

You are most certainly not at the point where it is safe to just not eat all day long. If you become low glucose, your body makes its own to kick it up. Really.

At some of the sites I recommend, if you see / hear talk of fasting - that is not - not - for someone just starting out on a low carb approach. Right now, regular meals matter to you.

Just try to avoid grains, beans, starchy veggies and fruit other than 1/2 cup of dark berries with a meal.

And, yes, any glucose meter can be off a bit either direction. Still, glad you got a meter as it should help as guide to
how certain foods work for you (or not).

Fasting numbers are for when you've not eaten for over 12 hours. Be sure it's at least 12 hours if possible. It matters a lot in what the test will read.

For you at this point in time, I do not think it's a good idea to cut out carbs -- but be selective for real foods, no packaged and a reasonable amount with protein and fats.

Avocados can be excellent and might really help your tummy.
They are great on both low-oxalate, low-lectin food plans, too. Good fats that your brain needs.

Easy to digest, too.

Forget about trying to loose weight. When the problems are being addressed, that can happen. This is not about weight. This is about the best food choices to fuel your body.

Stress raises cortisol. that creates more fat storage on our bodies.

you might watch the videos at VIRTA HEALH if you have trouble reading. Most of the names I listed above have VIDEOS, too.

But more than one or two a day can be confusing.

Hey, never apologize for having emotion around all this.

I hope you will gain comfort knowing that a properly formulated diet can help put blood glucose where it should be.
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LisaK
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I thought avacados were higher in oxcalate?

my fasting was at least 12 hours always. and its aprox. 110-119. except today it was 98 !

my biggest concern is the sx. im so tired of how I feel. I can eat whatever and it triggers them. I will continue to test though, and I will check out after eating to see, but I am seeing a trend so far that shows little hike after I eat even a sugar treat.

I know - you are right about food choices. I greif ate 10 pounds onto my body from my mom leaving this earth. I ate everything I wanted. but now im ready to be better with all that again.

--------------------
"The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."

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Keebler
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Eggs, too. should be easy on your tummy. Avocados and eggs can work for any meal.

There are still lots of veggies that are low in oxalate. As you deal with that issue, though, be sure to take magnesium CITRATE - with food. Often it's best alone but if your stomach is already compromised by the oxalate readings your are sending out . . . better for your tummy to have with food, I think.

As for feeling emotional about "all this" -- if you are not eating likely your blood sugar is also crashing a lot.

The body can also make its own glucose, well, it releases what's stored in the liver, etc. but if your glucose is crashing low then your body could be in panic mode

with combination of crashing low hypo and also with your body trying to normalize by pumping out from its liver stores.

And emotions will also go all over the place. I hope you can find foods that you can tolerate. For meats - cut into tiny bites and be sure to chew well, makes for easier digestion.

Oh, be sure to avoid pepper and most spices, too. They are typically high in oxalates. Keep it basic for now with sea salt unless you find the ones that are best.

Also the point of finding out your glucose readings, etc. is seek the truth. Try to keep emotions about outcome away if you can.

When you have the truth - you know more about what's going on . . . unless very very high glucose (which your glucometer does not indicate) . . . you will most likely see that it's all controllable with the right kinds of food (low carb, good fats, adequate protein).

In fact, even the few days prior to going in for your blood draw, be sure to be steady with your food choices so you have a proper picture.

The point is not to have this or that diagnosis - for it's not necessarily a black and white diagnosis as much as just seeing how your body is doing and what you might need to do to help get things on a even keel. With glucose, we have lots of control when we know more.

Take care.
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Keebler
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When you have the A1c blood draw at the lab, they will likely also order a serum glucose - to see what your glucose is at that point in time. Ask to be sure.

Take in your own glucose meter with you - and at that same time - test with it, too.

Record it. Then when your blood tests come back, you can see how close your glucose meter is the actual serum glucose reading at that exact point in time.

It will be good to have that detail.
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Lymetoo
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Avocados are pretty high in oxalates.

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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Lymetoo
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OK .. found this out:

The HASS and La Huerta avocados are low.

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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Keebler
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It's rough when so many lists differ.

From my study notes. The last source, is one that I really trust.


https://www.livestrong.com/article/497527-high-alkaline-low-oxalate-foods/

High-Alkaline, Low-Oxalate Foods - Livestrong -

. . . Avocados contain a low amount of oxalate . . . .


https://mydoctor.kaiserpermanente.org. . . etc....

Kaiser Perm. list

Bottom half, right side . . . Fruits section . . . lists avocado as low oxalate


http://www.pkdiet.com/pdf/LowOxalateDiet.pdf

p 3. left column. In Fruits section, avocado listed as low.


https://sallyknorton.com/oxalate-science/

Sally K. Norton - Oxalate Science

. . . 1/4 of the way down, see sections for High, Med. and Low

Low:

Meats, dairy, eggs, other non-plant foods, and fats and oils of all types.

Many vegetables, including

arugula, avocado, bok choy,

cabbage, cauliflower, cilantro, cucumber,

garlic, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard greens,

mushrooms, onions, red bell pepper, green peas,

winter squash, turnips, and watercress, are low in oxalates.

It’s a myth that green vegetables are all high in oxalates! . . .

. . . Nutrients impact oxalates in the body

The amount produced by your metabolism can go up if you’re deficient in vitamin B6 or if you take high doses of vitamin C.

Thus, excessive C or a B6 deficiency may contribute to problems with oxalate in some people. . . .
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Lymetoo
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The sad news for me is that they are high in salicylates and histamine.

Lisa, I’m sorry I can’t help with your other questions. Maybe you can find a FB group for diabetes.

--------------------
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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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