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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » A Consideration Before starting the Salt and Vitamin C Regimen...

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Author Topic: A Consideration Before starting the Salt and Vitamin C Regimen...
pingpong
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Member # 13706

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Emmanuel Revici, M.D. on excess dietary sodium chloride.

I should like to recommend to those of us considering the salt and vitamin C regim to first consider the statements made by the late Emmanuel Revici, M.D., R.I.P.

http://tinyurl.com/3xc8bp


Method for counteracting the adverse effects of sodium chloride

Abstract
A composition comprising at least one compound containing a cation of magnesium, calcium, or strontium and an anion of bivalent negative sulfur or selenium, and at least one compound containing a cation of lithium or potassium and an anion of bivalent negative sulfur or selenium. Also, a composition comprising salt and the previously described compounds along with a method for counteracting the adverse effects of sodium chloride on a human body by administering to the body between about 0.5 and 10% of one of the disclosed compositions, preferably in a water solution.


TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in a method for counteracting the deleterious effects of sodium chloride on the human body. More particularly, the invention relates to the administration of specific compositions or mixtures of compounds which are antagonists for sodium chloride.

BACKGROUND ART

It has become apparent in recent years that the ingestion of sodium chloride, especially at the higher levels to which humans have become accustomed, has deleterious effects, mainly related to the cardiovascular system, e.g., high blood pressure and arteriosclerosis. Such ingestion has also been shown to also encourage the growth of tumors. Efforts to restrict the ingestion of salt by eating low or unsalted food or substitute alternate condiments for salt has not been very successful. Therefore, it is preferred to develop non-toxic compounds which counteract the effects of salt and which can be ingested separately or along with the salt.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,499,078 suggests one method for achieving this result. The patent discloses that the anabolic effects of salt on a human body can be reduced by ingesting a compound which has an catabolic action. Specifically, the patent discloses that a magnesium compound containing bivalent negative sulfur may be taken with the salt or separately to offset the effects of the salt on the body. The content of that patent is expressly incorporated by reference herein.

The present invention relates to an improvement in such compounds for more effective counteraction of the deleterious effects of sodium chloride on the body, particularly with regard to the effect of sodium chloride on neoplastic diseases.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a composition comprising the combination of at least one compound containing a cation of magnesium, calcium, or strontium and an anion of bivalent negative sulfur or selenium, and at least one compound containing a cation of lithium or potassium and an anion of bivalent negative sulfur or selenium. A preferred bivalent negative sulfur is a thiosulfate or thiocyanate anion, and these compositions may also contain a compound containing a fluoride, silicon or oxygen anion. Advantageously, the magnesium, calcium or strontium compounds are present in an amount of about 2:1 to 20:1 of the lithium or potassium compounds.

The invention also relates to a composition comprising the combination of at least one of magnesium, calcium or strontium thiosulfate, at least one of magnesium, calcium, or strontium thiocyanate, and at least one of lithium or potassium thiosulfate. In this composition, the relative amounts of magnesium, calcium and strontium thiosulfate to magnesium calcium, and strontium thiocyanate to lithium or potassium thiosulfate ranges from about 2:1:1 to about 20:3:1. The composition can also include lithium or potassium fluoride.

An other embodiment of the invention includes compositions of sodium chloride along with the compounds described hereinabove. In these mixtures, the sodium chloride is present in an amount of about 66 to 90 weight percent and preferably between about 75 and 85 weight percent of the composition.

The invention also contemplates a method for counteracting the adverse effects of sodium chloride on the human body which comprises administering to the body one of the compositions described above. These compositions may or may not contain salt.

In this method, the amount of composition to be administered ranges from between 0.5 and 10% by weight, and preferably about 2%, in a water solution.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In U.S. Pat. No. 4,499,078, it was established that the biological activity of various compounds with the body can be classified as either anabolic (constructive) or catabolic (destructive). It was also shown that sodium chloride has an anabolic effect, whereas compounds containing bivalent negative sulfur have a catabolic effect. Thus, the anabolic effect of the sulfur counteracts the anabolic effect of the sodium chloride. The manifest action of sodium chloride upon the appearance and growth of cancers has been established through several experiments. Tumors were produced by a transplant into the hind leg of rats and mice. These tumors were found to grow larger and more rapidly when the animals also received sodium chloride in their drinking water. The size and growth of the resultant tumors caused the animals to die earlier than those who did not ingest the salt.

In groups of 100 exbreeder mice of the strain FC.sub.1, the number of spontaneous mammary tumors and the death from other conditions was recorded, during a one year observation. Spontaneous cancer was shown to be increased by the salt intake. In untreated animals, considered as controls, the average for 100 animals in one year observation was around 44% of spontaneous mammary cancers and of 15% death from other conditions than cancer. The addition of 2% salt in drinking water increased the spontaneous cancer to 65% for one year and a mortality of 20% from other conditions.

In animals injected intramuscularly with the carcinogens methylcholanthrene or benzyprene, the number of positive results was not only markedly increased but the tumors appeared earlier when the animals also ingested salt.

All these experiments are indicative of a marked enhancement upon the appearance, growth and malignant evolution of cancer by the action of ingested sodium chloride

Statistical studies have also shown a relationship between the high intake of salt and arteriosclerosis. U.S. Pat. No. 4,499,078 showed that, in New Zealand rabbits, the intake of 2 g of cholesterol daily induced the appearance of aortic atheromatosis, and that the addition of salt in the drinking water increases the appearance of such atheromas.

The fact is that the diet of people in civilized countries includes an amount of salt which is about ten times higher than the amount considered to be necessary physiologically. Thus, applicant believes that the high occurrence of arteriosclerosis and even cancer may be at least partially attributed to this high sodium chloride intake.

A study of the biological action of the elements has shown the existence of antagonistic actions according to their reciprocal characters and position in the periodic table.

Besides the antagonism between the anabolic and catabolic elements which is related to the different series to which they belong, other antagonistic actions occur between elements in following positions in the same series. In the specific case of sodium, the first antagonism is seen for the catabolic elements, while the second for potassium and lithium, as immediately inferior and superior elements in the same A-1 series. Thus, in such a case a biological antagonistic action is found to correspond to the following cations: magnesium, calcium, strontium, potassium and lithium. Chlorine antagonists include the bivalent negative sulfur, bivalent negative selenium, silicon, fluorine and oxygen.

Especially active antagonists of the sodium chloride are the thiosulfates, thiocyanates, fluorides and chlorates of magnesium, calcium, strontium, potassium and lithium. To these, sodium or potassium chlorate may also be added due to their available oxygen.

Research has shown that each of these preparations has a salutary effect upon the noxious manifestations of the sodium chloride in cancer and arteriosclerosis.

While each one of these products has shown favorable effects by itself in the different experiments for counteracting the noxious effect of the administration of salt in cancer and arteriosclerosis, the concommitant use of two or more of these agents have shown improved results through what is believe to be synergistic action.

The antisodium agents are used as such or added to the salt preparations, and used together. Taste, smell and water solubility are the main criteria for choosing from the different compounds, those which are not changing the qualities of the salt when added to it.

It has been found that at least two of these agents in combination are very effective for counteracting the effects of salt. While any combination of bivalent negative sulfur containing compounds can be used, the most advantageous compounds to date are those containing a combination of nontoxic thiosulfates and thiocyanates. Preferably, at least one Group II thiosulfate or thiocyanate should be combined with at least one Group I thiosulfate or thiocyanate.

Specifically, the combination of magnesium or calcium thiosulfate or thiocyanate with either strontium, potassium or lithium thiosulfate or thiocyanate has been found to be suitable for preparing formulations of this additive. Also combinations of these components can be varied or mixed to provide additional formulations which would be suitable.

The following formulas were seen to give particularly good results:

______________________________________ Proportion (percent) Component Agent A Agent B ______________________________________ Magnesium thiosulfate 6 10 Magnesium thiocyanate 3 3 Calcium thiosulfate 3 3 Strontium thiosulfate 1 1 Potassium thiosulfate 2 2 Lithium fluoride 0.03 0.05 Sodium chloride balance balance ______________________________________

In experiments using rats with Furth tumors transplanted in the hind leg, the administration of 2% salt in drinking water has increased the tumors (with an average, for 10 rats), to 30% more than in the untreated control rats. The use of a 2% mixture of the salt plus the antisodium chloride agents--has induced a manifest reduction of the tumor even with 10% below the controls without salt and of more than 35% for those having received sodium chloride alone. This action was markedly more manifest with the administration of the complex than with any compound alone, when added to the salt. From these experiments it has appeared advisable to use the modified salt to replace ordinary salt.

Mice and rats which received either of the specific complex salts listed above in drinking water for over 6 months did not exhibit any side effects. When these solutions were given to young animals, their growth was not observed to be different from that of the control group (i.e.--those which received no solution).

Based upon these experiments in animals, the continuous use of the corrected salt may have a basic influence upon both cancer and arteriosclerosis in humans as well.

While it is apparent that the invention herein disclosed is well calculated to fulfill the objects above stated, it will be appreciated that numerous modifications and embodiments may be devised by those skilled in the art, and it is intended that the appended claims over all such modifications and embodiments as fall within the true spirit and scope of the presnt invention.


http://tinyurl.com/388gmm

Methods for counteracting the deleterious effects of sodium chloride

Abstract
A substantially tasteless, non-toxic composition comprising sodium chloride and a magnesium compound containing bivalent negative sulfur and method of using the compositions to control the deleterious effects of large amounts of sodium chloride on the human body.


FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in a composition and process for reducing the deleterious effects of ingested sodium chloride and, more particularly, relates to a composition or mixture including sodium chloride and a magnesium compound containing bivalent negative sulfur.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It has become apparent in recent years that the ingestion of sodium chloride, especially at the higher levels to which humans have become accustomed, has deleterious effects, mainly related to the cardiovascular system, e.g., high blood pressure and arteriosclerosis, but also encourages growth of tumors. Efforts to restrict the ingestion of salt by eating low or unsalted food or substituting condiments has not been very successful.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A study of the biological activity of compounds has shown that they include either destructive-catabolic or constructive-anabolic actions in the human body. The manifestations of an abnormal condition, as symptoms, signs, pathology analyses and response to therapy are related to this dualism. Hypertension, arteriosclerosis and the growth of tumors are recognized as typical constructive anabolic manifestations. On the other hand, I have shown that the action of compounds upon the body has either an anabolic or a catabolic action. Thus, compounds can be classified as anabolic or catabolic by a series of tests.

By tests, such as of the effect on the second day wound crust pH, or on the curve of the healing of a wound, or on the bloor eosinophile leukocytes and potassium, or on the urine pH, surface tension, specific gravity and chloride excretion, compounds can be established as either anabolic constructive or catabolic destructive.

Through the study from this point of view of the biological actions of the elements, I have shown that the members of the different series (vertical grouping) of the periodic table have either anabolic or catabolic actions. The IA series, to which the sodium belongs, has anabolic actions. The same for the IIIA, VA and VIIA, to which the chloride element belongs. Sodium chloride consequently produces high anabolic effects. Oppositely, I have shown that the series IIA, IVA and VIA have antagonistic catabolic effects.

I have further found that the elements of the same period (horizontal grouping) act at the same level of the body organization, such as subnuclear, nuclear, cellular, metazoic or systemic, and that the sodium and the chloride act at the same metazoic level (tissues and organs). The biological effect of sodium chloride is thus a strong anabolic action at the metazoic level. This explains the noxious action upon the blood pressure and arteries, leading to the anabolic-constructive arteriosclerosis.

Following the same systematization of the elements acting at the same metazoic level as the sodium and chloride but having an opposite catabolic action, it appeared that the use of one or more of the catabolic metazoic elements would produce the opposite action of this biological effect of the sodium chloride.

This was shown to be true experimentally. Magnesium was seen to be opposite biologically to sodium, while the sulfur biologically opposite chlorine. In the case of sulfur, it was found that the bivalent negative was more active than the tetra- and hexa-valent positive.

Based on these primary considerations, compounds having magnesium and sulfur were used, in order to show this antagonism as set forth in the following experiments.

The bilateral adrenalectomy in young rats, of below 150 g, was seen to have almost 100% mortality. The administration of 1% solutions of sodium chloride as drinking water was seen to protect the adrenalectomized animals and, if administered for a sufficient length of time, to prevent the death. The administration together with the sodium chloride of magnesium sulfate, the last in subcutaneous repeated injections of 0.5 ml of a 10% solution for 100 g of animal or orally as 1% in drinking water, was seen to be antagonistic to the action of the sodium chloride. In the adrenalectomized animals treated with sodium chloride and magnesium sulfate the mortality was over 80% instead of almost zero for the adrenalectomized animals receiving only the sodium chloride. The same for the older animals, to which the administration of magnesium sulfate (1% in drinking water) was seen to increase the mortality from 20% in controls to 75% in the animals receiving the magnesium sulfate. The use of the magnesium thiosulfate was still more effective than the magnesium sulfate.

The relationship between sodium chloride, magnesium sulfates and arteriosclerosis was seen in the following experiments.

New Zealand rabbits were given 2 grams of cholesterol a day, orally, together with their food. Sacrificed after one month, they showed atheromatous lesions of the aorta. The animals sacrificed after only two weeks of receiving the cholesterol showed only few minimal lesions or none at all. The addition of sodium chloride (3% to the drinking water) to the animals receiving 2 g of cholesterol daily was seen to induce manifest aorta lesions and this after only two weeks of treatment with cholesterol.

The administration of magnesium thiosulfate at 3%, together with the 3% sodium chloride in the drinking water, was seen to prevent the appearance of the aorta lesions, not only after two weeks as in the controls with NaCl alone, but even after one month.

As noted above, antagonism exists between magnesium and sodium which counteracts the biological action of sodium and that the same antagonism exists between the chlorine and sulfur, especially in the bivalent negative state.

It is thus possible to overcome the adverse effects of sodium chloride by adding various magnesium compounds, such as magnesium oxide or magnesium acetylsalicylate and the sulfur compounds separately. Various sulfur compounds or even colloidal sulfur can be used for this purpose. The ingestation of colloidal sulfur has been found to produce sulfides in the intestines of animals. The bond of magnesium to catabolic sulfur enhances this antisodium action. It has been found that the best results are obtained by utilizing a magnesium compound containing bivalent negative sulfur and especially magnesium thiosulfate.

The composition is prepared by merely mixing sodium chloride with magnesium thiosulfate, preferably previously heated around 170.degree. C. in order to eliminate or reduce its hydrated water. The crystals of magnesium thiosulfate are preferably ground to a fine powder before mixing with sodium chloride. The sodium chloride crystals can also be ground to a fine powder if desired. In this manner the taste of magnesium thiosulfate in the composition is substantially reduced. The amount of magnesium thiosulfate should be at least about 1% by weight of the total composition in order to subsequently antagonize the adverse effects of sodium chloride. Amounts as high as 10% by weight of magnesium thiosulfate can be employed without substantially affecting the taste of the sodium chloride. Amounts as high as 25% by weight could be used where taste is not a factor.

Other catabolic agents, of a lower organizational level of the cells, such as Ca, Sc, V, Mn, Co, Cu, Ge and Se may be added together with the magnesium and sulfur.

Other antianabolic agents, such as vitamins A, D, B.sub.6 and B.sub.12, fatty acids, aldehydes, and the special group of agents having a twin formation (2 atoms with the same electrical charge bound together) can also be added to the magnesium-sulfur agents if desired.

--------------------
pingpong

Posts: 361 | From At the Pingpong Tournament | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pingpong
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Member # 13706

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pingpong

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