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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Mercury and acetylcholine

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Author Topic: Mercury and acetylcholine
Marnie
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More on mercury...

``Acetylcholine is an example of a totally untraceable poison.

Later work showed that when acetylcholine binds to acetylcholine receptors on striated muscle fibers, it opens channels in the membrane.

***Sodium ions then enter the muscle cell, stimulating muscle contraction.***

(Edema?)

Acetylcholine is also used in the brain, where it tends to cause excitatory actions.

The glands that receive impulses from the parasympathetic part of the autonomic nervous system are also stimulated in the same way.

Acetylcholine is synthesized in certain neurons by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase from the compounds choline and acetyl-CoA.

***Organic mercurial compounds have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups, which attributes to its effect on

enzyme dysfunction of choline acetyl transferase.***

This inhibition may lead to acetylcholine deficiency, and can have consequences on motor function.''

So, mercury interferes with choline acetyltransferase (an enzyme) which would impact the amt. of acetylcholine we make.

Choline + choline acetyltransferase + acetyl CoA = acetylcholine.

Defensive move by the body? Store/pull from stores of Hg (mercury) which ALSO is a ``poison'' to stop overproduction of acetylcholine?

Bb cannot breakdown acetylcholine. It looks like it counts on us to make it, break it down, make it....

This is throwing off acetylcholine's ``competitor'' norepinephrine which -> N acetyltransferase.

Bb's genetic analysis indicates it has C-acetyltransferase.

It looks like nitrogen is key. This is also the "working part" of the indole of melatonin.

It looks like norepinephrine breaks down "brown fat".

If Bb's 23 kDa protein in its outer wall contains tyrosine, this might trigger NFkB which in turn increases TNF alpha - inflammation.

Normally, tyrosine is one thing that INactivates NFkB. But if it is not "available" to do so...

Tyrosine -> norepinephrine -> N-acetyltransferase.

Looks like norepinephrine is being "downregulated".

One thing that increases norepinephrine is St. John's Wort.

Be careful. Watch combining this with certain drugs! It apparently makes birth control pills ineffective too. Interfering with cholesterol -> estrogen? (Estrogen and testosterone come FROM cholesterol.)

Hypericinin , C30H16O8 St. John's Wort

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Vermont_Lymie
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Hi Marnie,

Wow, this is interesting -- but your knowledge of biochemistry is much greater than mine!

Does this mean that our lyme brains are not producing as much norepinephrine (sp?) than they used to if they were not lyme-brains?

(Could that be why I feel better when I take Sudafed for a cold, as it is norepinephrine?

thanks for any information

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Marnie
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Niacin will block neuro acetylcholine receptors, but not the muscle acetylcholine receptors.

Too much rapid firing - also due to glutamate toxicity.

The NMDA receptors are blocked by Mg and zinc...normally.

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Vermont_Lymie
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Thank you Marnie for sharing what you know, the education you and other netters are providing is very appreciated!

[bow]

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