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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » TINNITUS: Ringing Between The Ears; Vestibular, Balance, Hearing with compiled links (Page 3)

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Author Topic: TINNITUS: Ringing Between The Ears; Vestibular, Balance, Hearing with compiled links
dogmom2
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not to be a downer, just want to re-emphsize Keebler's posts about protecting your ears. As bad as tinnitus is, it can get worse, louder, higher pitched, and new noises can show up and stay. so please be careful and protect your ears!
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Keebler
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Dogmom,

thanks for that reminder. You are not a "downer" if you are trying to protect others' ears and vestibular function. It's vital.

I'm glad to see others take this seriously. Prevention matters.

--------------------------------------------

A big thanks to Bea Seibert for this EAR PROTECTION SUPPLEMENT info:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=122101;p=0

seibertneurolyme - 03 January, 2013


Wanted to make sure you were aware of this info regarding hearing loss.

http://www.vanguardneurologist.com/category/hearing-loss
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dbpei
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Keebler,
I went to an ENT in NJ who was referred to as lyme literate by the Tick Born Disease Alliance. He works very closely with a well respected LLMD in the NYC area.

He ordered a cat scan and spoke with me at length about my hearing loss and related symptoms. He said that he could rule out SCD based on the results of the cat scan. I hope that I can trust his expertise on this.

My hyperacusis is much better than it was after I lost my hearing. But my ears are still bothered by amplified sounds, such as at concerts, loud speakers, and machinery. I received some movie theater tickets from my daughter for Christmas and I am afraid I will have to give them away because I don't think my ears could manage the extreme volume.

I don't hear internal sounds to the degree that Adrian McLeish did. But I do hear gritty sounds with neck and head movement. I pray to God that I do not have SCD or a CSF leak. My local ENT has assured me that I do not have these. But you begin to lose faith in the medical system after you have been through something like this illness.

Thanks for all of your guidance on tinnitus and auditory/vestibular issues. By the way, vinpocetine may be helping to tone down my tinnitus a bit. It took about 2 weeks, but the noise is much easier to tolerate and I am having more good days with it. Hope this continues!!

I just started the Salt C protocol, which is aggravating the tinnitus now. But I am hopeful that eventually, things will quiet down. I will keep you posted.

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Keebler
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I just realized I should have posted this here when I saw a connection. Another poster's vertigo question today made me remember:

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Only since I had been on Berberine for a while this past year did that vertigo drop / hit / swish from turning my head get better. I'm also better able to turn my head in the kitchen. Berberine is the only thing that is new to me that could account for the marked improvement.

But I do not recall how far into taking this I noticed it. It was just a nice "gift" and it has stayed with me as long as I stay on Berberine. I do go off it frequently when I run out and need to wait for the next month to get more. So, I can tell that it really helps.

Ginger was not enough for me but still can be a helper. Of course, if you have a LLMD, targeting the TBD (tick-borne disease, parasites, etc.) is vital, of course. MAGNESIUM & Liver Support, too.

It's just that Berberine seems to have had such a great effect for my ears, in absence of being able to have a LL doctor and be on a full protocol.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=121034;p=0

BERBERINE – LINKS SET
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fred0
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Huge thread. Tinitus actually led me to also find out I have Lyme D.. Yet, the only tick bite I was ever aware of was some 30 years prior!!!!??

You gotta be joking me.

Actually, finding out I have Lyme didn't help me any. It only landed me in more confusion and contradiction, at least till now.

Tinitus is horrible. It plays on the mind and makes one subjective which then just feeds the whole monster. It is a musician's worst nightmare (along with Tendonitis, which I also fight with).

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Keebler
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Fred,

Sorry to hear you are still not settled on a good ILADS educated LL doctor (whether MD or ND). And I know how confusing this all can be. Still, until these stealth infections are directly targeted, there is little chance for success.

All the support methods in the world are not enough to bring remission. They can sure help while you figure out which way to go but they are certainly not going to get you where you need to go.

I hope you can find the best expert you can. Soon. If you can't, then there are other ways to approach this. Just be certain that lyme and whatever other tick-borne or stealth infections that may be in the mix are directly targeted.

Lyme, in ALL its forms needs to be addressed to, most specifically, the cystic form. What works against spirochetes will not work against the cystic form.

And, since it was discovered, lyme has been known to also carry parasites with it. When addressed, that aspect often helps propel success. Still, it can take one - several years to reach remission, even with the best protocol and proper combinations / rotations. Don't give up.

Yes, lyme can hang around for 30 years after a bite but, often, we don't recall being bitten. And mosquitoes and other vectors can carry lyme, too, so it's not just ticks.

Lyme is incredibly complex. All is not yet known but those who are with ILADS are the only ones, IMO, who have taken the initiative to learn as much as they can. All ILADS LLMD or LL ND are are not equal in all aspects, of course, but - still - whomever you see, they must have that knowledge base as a start.

I would look for one who also offers solid advice on support methods for both targeting and support must go hand in hand.

And, if you can't locate a LL doctor (I know how that is) there are other ways. It's just going to be harder to but it is possible. Some have found other ways (as they also study as much as possible from ILADS LL authors' articles and books).

You might also consider a rife machine. Connect with your area lyme support groups to learn about wider options.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=117755;p=0

Topic: RIFE Machine - Reference LINKS
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[ 09-18-2013, 03:29 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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In an interview, this author said that, based on her research, at the very most, no more than ONE dose per week of acetaminophen and it would be best to avoid it altogether. She said it's just such a risk to hearing damage.


http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/link-between-pain-relievers-and-hearing-loss

Pain Relievers and the Risk of Hearing Loss

- By Sharon G. Curhan, MD - 10/09/2012

Excerpts:

. . . The First Large Study of Analgesic Use and Hearing Loss in Women

We studied over 60,000 women who are participants in the Nurses’ Health Study II and followed them for 14 years in order to prospectively examine whether analgesic use is a risk factor for hearing loss in women.

During follow-up, over 10,000 women developed hearing loss.

The participants in the Nurses’ Health Studies are a remarkable group of dedicated and reliable women who have been followed for decades and have provided our group of researchers with a wealth of detailed information on their diet, lifestyle factors, medication use, medical conditions, and more. We used this information to evaluate how their use of analgesic medications may be related to hearing.

The Major Findings

We found that women who regularly took the analgesics ibuprofen or acetaminophen two or more days per week had an increased risk of hearing loss and the more often a woman took either of these medications, the higher her risk tended to be. . . .

. . . For acetaminophen, we found that compared with women who used acetaminophen less than one day per week, the increased risk for women who used acetaminophen 2 or more days per week ranged from 11 to 21% and the risk tended to be higher with increasing use. . . .

. . . Acetaminophen may deplete important factors, such as the powerful antioxidant glutathione, that protect the cochlea from damage. . . .

. . . Our findings for ibuprofen and acetaminophen are consistent with what we previously reported in MEN. In men, we also found that regular use of aspirin was associated with an increased risk of hearing loss. . . .

. . . What Does This All Mean?

There are a number of factors that contribute to the development of hearing loss. Advancing age is a strong risk factor, along with some medical conditions, certain medications, exposure to excessive noise and genetics. Our findings suggest that frequent analgesic use may also be an important but preventable contributor to hearing loss. . . .

----------------------

http://www.lakeviewhearing.com/new-study-finds-frequent-ibuprofen

Lakeview Hearing Center

NEW STUDY FINDS FREQUENT IBUPROFEN AND ACETAMINOPHEN USE MAY INCREASE RISK OF HEARING LOSS

References:

Curhan, S.G., Shargorodsky, J., Eavey, R., & Curhan, G.C. (2012). Analgesic use and the risk of hearing loss in women. American Journal of Epidemiology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1093/aje/kws146

Curhan, S.G., Shargorodsky, J., Eavey, R., & Curhan, G.C. (2010). Analgesic use and the risk of hearing loss in men. American Journal of Medicine, 123(3), 231-237.

These can be found at PubMed.
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dbpei
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Thanks for sharing, Keebler.
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Keebler
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HAIR DRYER

I am so very serious that most hair dryers out there should have the cord cut and put into recycling (if possible). They are making us a deaf nation.

But, sadly, a hundred bucks is the amount it takes to avoid that -- or AIR DRY. Which I still do most days.

My beyond a decade old hairdryer just bit the dust. That model no longer made. Long search. Here's my homework:

Only #2 and #3 have decibel ratings. I will keep it. Zappos has such a good return policy & customer satisfaction I've found over the years - and free returns so I could gamble on the sound. And it's fine - but not on high.


http://www.farouk.com/haircare/chi

CHI home website

http://vip.zappos.com

ZAPPOS: CHI Home CHI bling Low EMF Ceramic Hair Dryer $110.

In "Champagne Ice"

"Extremely lightweight and quiet" & "Reduces level of EMF"

impressive wide round chord and safety plug

ordered on Sat. 12-21-13
not on many other sites, did find some good reviews, mentioning "quiet" on Macy's site.

Great customers reviews at Amazon . . . many praised the quiet nature of this.

Free return and up to a year to return if any problem. Zappos customer service in the past has been fantastic for other things. They replaced a tea kettle that did not last long enough.


Consideration #2.

http://www.hammacher.com/Product/82803?promo=search

THE QUIET HAIR DRYER $100.

72.8 dB - CRICKET Q-ZONE


Consideration #3.

[URL=http://www.amazon.com/

Onei MK-II Air Ionique Hair Dryer with Ionic Generator for Professional Blowouts

75 dB, according to 2 questions answered.

4 year warranty

70 five star reveiws $80

Ooops:

Sept. 2013: My main complaint about this product is its strong plastic odor. I've let it air out for days and it still smells.. It's a good product, and it is very quiet compared to other hair dryers. I've own it several weeks now and the plastic components still really smell.

(end customer feedback excerpt)

[I suggest contacting the company about this as they still seem a good company and they may have corrected it . . . but I'd want to know for sure, first.]
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[ 08-28-2015, 06:14 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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And I still wear earplugs to dry hair, even with a quieter dryer. It matters.

But even ear plugs are not enough for most hair dryers. The noise can damage through bone conduction and also travels through the nasal passages to the inner ear structure.

And still air dry (or mostly air dry) most days.

Only two listed above have decibel ratings. So many others may use the term "quiet" in their ad, or even the name but after scouring through dozens (if not hundreds) of reviews, comment were so very often about how loud they were.

I called the headquarters for a couple different ones. In one that had "quiet" in it's name, an engineer there was able to tell me that it's 90 dB. 90 is a terribly loud and ear damaging level.

How dare they, is my first thought.
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[ 01-28-2014, 04:14 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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New edition

http://hearinglosshelp.com/shop/ototoxic-drugs-exposed/

Ototoxic Drugs Exposed (3rd edition)

The Shocking Truth About Prescription Drugs, Medications, Chemicals and Herbals That Can (and Do) Damage Our Ears

By Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

. . . detailed listings of the ear-damaging side effects of 877 drugs, 35 herbals and 148 chemicals (798 pages).
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[ 12-16-2015, 06:58 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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dbpei
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Thank you for posting this, Keebler! [Smile]
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Keebler
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Still, his 3rd edition of Ototoxic Drugs is best to have for a fuller set . . . yet this is helpful even if it does not cover as much as the book.

http://hearinglosshelp.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/tinnitusdruglist2013.pdf

Prescription Medications, Over-the-Counter Drugs, Herbs & Chemicals Associated with Tinnitus

2013 Edition - 30 pages - Compiled by Neil G. Bauman, Ph.D.
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[ 12-16-2015, 08:50 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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Thanks (really!) to Lymedin2010 for starting this

Cringe worthy - but very important thread - with details to learn just in case, eh? Or in case someone is acting erratically with ear pain, too!

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=034477;p=0

Bug / Tick in Ear Canal - various experiences

A few things to know, a few things to do . . . .

Excerpt:

". . . The ear canal is innervated by four cranial nerves, all of which relay sensory information to the brain.

It’s sensory overload if something even slightly irritates that teensy patch of skin. . . ."
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linky123
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Tinnitus is a symptom of pyroluria, which can go hand in hand with lyme:

http://www.growyouthful.com/ailment/pyroluria.php

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

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Keebler
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Linky, thanks for pointing that out. It's mentioned in early posts here, but by the time a thread gets to be multiple pages, it's helpful to post some refresher notes to keep the importance in mind.

Good link.

Indeed. When the body can't metabolize all it needs to, that kind of toxicity & reactivity can damage tissue, especially NERVE tissue.

Pyroluria and Porphyria (not exactly the same yet "on the same page" in many ways)

- whether genetic or acquired --

the inability of the liver to make the enzymes required to full metabolize certain waste byproducts, chemicals - or otherwise manage those

or even tolerate certain substances AT ALL (such as some Rx) -

See the Porphyria links here for what can help:


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=030792;p=0

LIVER & KIDNEY SUPPORT & and several HERXHEIMER support links, too.
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Keebler
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ [search article here if the Tiny URL expires]

http://tinyurl.com/cjsty8s

Can't get a tune out of your head? Tina had that for 30 YEARS... only to discover that the cure is surprisingly simple

By Jenny Hudson - 11 December 2012

Excerpts:

. . . Tina is describing a surprisingly common condition, musical ear syndrome.

It is a form of tinnitus, a condition that affects one in ten of us.

But while tinnitus is usually a buzzing, ringing or whistling sound in the ear, without any obvious source, in some people it takes the form of phantom music.

Around 90 per cent of those with the condition develop it as a result of hearing loss, says Tim Griffiths, professor of cognitive neurology at Newcastle University. . . .

. . . [Huw Cooper] says: ‘We see people every week who report hearing phantom music, and it’s something that may be under-reported.

‘This is because people are familiar with tinnitus as banging or ringing, but when they hear music, they don’t think of tinnitus. Instead, they worry they are going mad.’
Brain scans show they are not. In fact, their brain activity during these hallucinations is very similar to people who are listening to actual music.

However, with musical hallucinations, there is no activity in the primary auditory cortex — the area close to the ear where sound signals are normally received and then sent further into the brain to be processed, explains Professor Griffiths.

‘If someone is deaf or loses their hearing, the part of the brain that processes sound signals is deprived of stimulation.

'In the absence of sound, the brain fills in the gaps, as it were, by turning to musical memory for stimulation.’ . . .

. . . [regarding what kind of tunes are "heard"] 'Memories laid down early in life with great frequency tend to be most deeply embedded in the subconscious,’ explains Dr McCollum. . . .

[Information here about the differences in phantom music, musical hallucination and ear worms]

[Various contributing factors listed, so it makes sense to seek out professional help, a neurotologist, say.]

[In Tina's case, hearing loss was the cause. Cochlear implants corrected the problem. Of course, there can be various causes, various solutions to consider.]
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Keebler
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After that last post, please go back up to previous pages and reconsider the OTOTOXIC DRUG and also posts that help to save hearing.

Get decibel rated ear muffs for use with blenders, vacuums, lawn tools, etc. Wear ear plugs with a hair dryer, etc.
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Keebler
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Relevant to other detail about SCD in posts above, so do scroll back for other information. Just wanted to post an update.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/857914-overview#a4

SUPERIOR CANAL DEHISCENCE SYNDROME

Updated: Jun 11, 2014


http://scdssupport.org/forum/viewforum.php?f=21&sid=dac0bcd7958a9b59da93c41700f40ff8

SCDS Support

The world's leading non-profit resource and support group for people with superior canal dehiscence syndrome


http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/otolaryngology/research/vestibular/recent_findings.html

SUPERIOR CANAL DEHISCENCE SYNDROME - Johns Hopkins

While JH, as the institution, has been terrible regarding lyme disease, one department and a few of their vestibular researchers have been excellent in the discovery & understand of, and treatment of SCD.

Good images here that really help "picture" the inner / middle ear
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[ 10-04-2015, 02:13 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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LymeToo posted this is a different thread:

"Vertigo, spinning, strange floaty boat rocking feelings, all worse after Levquin the beginning of the year."


Warning on Levaquin and other fluoroquinolones .. for future reference:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=130342;p=0

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Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=131625;p=0

VACCINE LINKS set - Ingredients in Vaccines
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Keebler
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A MOVIE THEATRE can become a torture chamber and cause damage to those with inner / middle ear / brain / adrenal issues. Be very careful out there.

Obviously, none of these special effects are a good idea for someone dealing with lyme &/or inner & middle ear issues.

I don't think they are a good idea for any human or animal, either. This is so very sad that it's come to this intense need for a "high hit" -

Even without these new effects, the sound / vibration environment is unsafe. Even if you think you are choosing a movie that should be safe, take ear plugs for you just never know.

http://money.cnn.com/gallery/technology/2016/08/24/movie-4dx/index.html

Seats that move! Rain! Movie-watching goes beyond 3D

By Channon Hodge - CNNMoney - Aug. 24, 2016

Seven Slides at link, captions for those:

Movie theaters are facing competition from your couch.

But some in the industry are hoping to lure people out of their homes and back to the movies with immersive special effects called 4DFog helped recreate the steamy jungle atmosphere in Disney's "The Jungle Book."

Think strobe lights, seats that move with the action, even the scent of coffee.

1. Viewers watching "Batman v Superman" in 4DX felt the breeze as Bruce Wayne ran through a graveyard in one of the movie's earliest scenes. That's thanks to face air technology, shown here in an artistic rendering.

2. To make a real splash with viewers, water rains down in relevant scenes. Prefer to stay dry? A button at your seat lets you turn off the effect quicker than you can open an umbrella.

3, Seats can give a little push in the lower back or tickle the legs at the right moments.

4. Fog helped recreate the steamy jungle atmosphere in Disney's "The Jungle Book."

[Poster's interjection here: Can you imagine the environment for mold this creates in the seat cushions that spurts all that steam? What's this going to do to the lungs of the young audience members? The rain effect, too, in that the vessel holding that water is likely not sterile.]

5. As the characters in "Zootopia" travel into Tundratown, the audience can get its own touch of winter thanks to snow effects.

6. Strobe lights add to the 4DX atmosphere. Strobe light effects made "Thor" seem even more superpowerful as he conjured up thunder and lightning.

[Poster's interjection: major seizure alert, major! This could also cause first time seizures.]
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Keebler
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SPORTING EVENTS, even at the local schools:

be mindful of buzzers and shouting.

Best to not shout yourself - shouting can be a tremendously blow to one's inner ear tissue and nerves -- figure out some kind of happy dance instead -

and take ear plugs so that the crowd shouting does not damage hearing. Remember, during use of many Rx, and for months afterward, hearing can be damaged at far less decibel level than normally.

And some of this damage might not show up for years. Some could show up the next day. Anytime there is tinnitus after attending an event with crowd or amplified sound (and that includes sports buzzers, even school bells -- and church bells), well,

while tinnitus can have many causes / variables / influences,

tinnitus after such event - is likely a sign there has been hearing damage . . . and also likely adrenal stress. Even if the tinnitus subsides after a day or a week, damage likely has set in.

Also remember ear plugs with hair dryers and ear plugs AND decibel rated earmuffs with appliances / machines.

Be careful, be protective, out there.
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Keebler
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http://whooshers.com/

WHOOSHERS.com


WHOOSHING ? "Pulsatile tinnitus is not tinnitus"


http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/tinnitus-whooshing-ears/

This woman’s struggle to diagnose the ‘whooshing’ in her ears

By Joyce Cohen, STAT - PBS NewsHour - October 7, 2016

Excerpts:

. . . “Pulsatile tinnitus is not tinnitus,” Greenwood said. “It’s a travesty that the two share a name.” . . . .

. . . Doctors often overlook the symptom. When patients start noticing a noise in the ear, they usually consult first with an otolaryngologist, or ENT.

They’re routinely, and mistakenly, told nothing can be done medically. That’s true for tinnitus. But not for pulsatile tinnitus.
If these patients are taking advice from doctors who know nothing about the distinction, they are not going to get the help they need,” Greenwood said. . . .

. . . Greenwood, 41, urges fellow whooshers to get the appropriate diagnostic imaging — often including an MRI — and circulate the films to doctors who might help. Many cases are fixable, often by a catheter-based procedure and occasionally by surgery.

(It’s important to make sure you have pulsatile tinnitus before getting an MRI, however, because the noisy scan can be dangerously loud for patients with regular tinnitus.) . . .


[Much more really important detail at link above. Be sure to read the full article.]

There is also a Facebook group but, sadly, one must be a Facebook member to even view the page:

https://www.facebook.com/login/?next=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fgroups%2F121285117907242%2F
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Keebler
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JET NOISE

Also to consider all military airstrips (and that's more branches than just the air force) might be anywhere you might consider going -

- and the local / international airports, too . . . and research their flight patterns and noise issues, even plans for changes.

Flight / Training patterns might matter nearly just as much as the location of the airports themselves.

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/39247-how-much-noise-can-a-person-survive-navy-jets-plague-the-lives-of-washington-residents

How Much Noise Can a Person Survive? Navy Jets Plague the Lives of Washington State Residents

By Dahr Jamail - Truthout - February 06, 2017

. . . The loudest jets ever built fly so close to Puget Sound that residents' dishes rattle and they become physically ill. . . .

Imagine living in a place where the loudest jets ever built regularly flew so close, your entire house vibrated, dishes rattled and fell off shelves, and the noise was so loud you became physically ill.

Your sleep was impacted, you couldn't work, and literally every single aspect of your life was affected negatively. . . .

. . . the Puget Sound region of Washington State, near Naval Air Station Whidbey on Whidbey Island.

Along with thousands of others there and other islands and locations throughout the Sound, Andrews is afflicted by health-endangering levels of noise from Naval EA-18G "Growler" warplanes, the single loudest aircraft ever built. . . .

. . . " . . . the impact of this low-vibration frequency noise on the body, and what the mechanics really are in creating the breakdown of bodily organs," . . . .

. . . A "Public Health Emergency" . . . .
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Just FYI. And, really, most cars are toxic so be sure to let them air out each time before getting in. Try to avoid new cars - though those made in Sweden are less toxic. This aspect is a more entailed search but in the news today:


http://www.cbsnews.com/news/ford-explorer-lawsuits-exhaust-leak-carbon-monoxide/

Is your Ford Explorer leaking exhaust?

CBS News - February 13, 2017


https://consumerist.com/2015/12/31/some-gm-suv-owners-say-their-vehicles-are-making-them-sick/

[My note: Around early February 2017 (or so), a similar & current news article but not sure of the exact vehicles, very large, top of the line SUVs -- same issues with vertigo for some but not all. Could be that those with inner ear / vestibular issues experience the symptoms worse.]

Some GM SUV Owners Say Their Vehicles Are Making Them Sick

The Consumerist - December 31, 2015

Excerpt:

. . . Autoblog.com reports that some full-size SUV owners have filed complaints with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that a buffeting and vibration problem in their

model year 2015 Chevy Tahoe, Suburban, Cadillac Escalade, and GMC Yukon vehicles [are] making them sick.

Owners say the issue can vary from an annoying vibration inside the vehicle to a more severe shaking that causes dizziness and headaches.

The owner of a 2015 Suburban filed a complaint in March noting that the car was creating a "buffeting, pressure sound, and sensation at low to mid range speeds. Creating headache, dizziness and strain."

In another complaint, a fellow 2015 Suburban owner, tells NHTSA when driving the vehicle "we experience an awful ear pressure vibration. The car is not drivable and is causing headaches and vertigo." . . .
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