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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » The Microscopy Thread (Page 3)

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Author Topic: The Microscopy Thread
S13
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Yeah im finding the same thing. I think its because the environment in the smear is deteriorating and thus most spiros will have converted to cyst. I think the string of pearls is also some kind of passive cystic form, because they seem to persist for long periods of time.

Im waiting 2 mins between each shot. So my previous movie was created from almost 800 separate images.

Having a darkfield condenser on your microscope makes it easier to detect the spirochetes. So anyone who is looking to buy a microscope, try to get one with a darkfield condenser. Most of these microscopes will only do 400x mag with darkfield, but that is enough, and it is what i use in my videos. Somehow 1000x oil darkfield requires a different (probably more expensive) condenser.

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Haley
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I have not read all of the posts, but have checked out a few of the photos and one time-lapse video. Very impressive. I have considered getting a microscope, but still have not made a purchase. I'm hoping to get a bit more strength, both mentally and physically before I mess with the microscope.

Would it be possible to use a time-lapse ap. from an iPhone ? I have not even seen what it does, just curious if the time-lapse feature could be used on the iPhone.

I am using an oxygen chamber. I thought it would be interesting to take before and after photos. The oxygen does seem to be helping quite a bit, fingers crossed.

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Lymedin2010
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Yes, you can, but any slight movement will easily disrupt the video. So if you have patience, then you can do it...I found out that I don't for long term hunting.


Here is an Apple TV app:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lapse-it-time-lapse-stop-motion/id539108382?mt=8


Here is video taken with a Samsung Galaxy S3 older phone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9va0KPrVExs


It is best you DIY a quick setup like this.
http://www.aurelm.com/2014/03/09/diy-smartphone-adapter-for-microscope-photography/


There are pre-made phone adapters, like this SkyLight, but I bought one & did not have any patience with the sensitivity from any movement & the plastic holder warped over time, so that it does not hold the phone properly anymore. Easy fix with some clamps, but for an expensive piece it should not lead to this & that is why I say just build your own.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6WBeB0kvUM


So it is good if you just want to see it in your blood & make a quick capture. If you are serious & want to do long term hunting & proof, then just do a USB cam or video cam connected with an adapter.

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Lymedin2010
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New video showing a spirochete go into cyst mode. Look at utube description for detail on what to look for.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsJ5Zit6q0U&list=UUt9FccFyhKI-fRGh0YKWDXg


I've had a new & very exciting video for some time. It is taking me forever to finish up the commentary & I just got a new mic which should help. New video will show:

-Medusa spirochetes

-Many change form into the String Of Pearls (SoP)

-Break up of spirochetes into multiple infinite forms

-Formation of 2 cysts

ALL IN ONE VIDEO!

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Lymedin2010
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Check out the newest video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hbin5ZT6A5s&list=UUt9FccFyhKI-fRGh0YKWDXg


As I mentioned above, the video will show:

-The reason why Lyme blood looks so horrific

-Medusa spirochetes

-Many change form into the String Of Pearls (SoP)

-Break up of spirochetes into multiple infinite forms

-Formation of 2 cysts

ALL IN ONE VIDEO!

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TNT
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Hey Lymedin2010,

I just watched the new video.

I saw the prominent kete, but didn't see it convert. I did notice it changing a little at the very end, but I will have to look at it again.

I did see the funny looking red blood cells. I think you have referred to them before as "crenated" red blood cells, but in the HD format, they sure looked (to me) like bartonella bacteria on the cells.

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Lymedin2010
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Hi TNT.

There is a lot going on in that video & the damn spiros don't stay still, bouncing around all the time.


Notice one of them break off & I show you with an arrow & then use the caption "A SoP spirochete broke off from the medusa."


I slowed down the video & showed you frame by frame & you can see it shrink at first for cysting & then break into 2 pieces that remain in the smaller cyst attempted configuration.


When I watch other spiro videos, I often find myself going back & forth to see things a few times in order to more clearly satisfy myself.


The most important take home lesson is this. Look at the plasma surrounding the medusa before & after the time lapse. Do you see all the dancing pieces of broken up spirochetes?


This is what we see when we see the wretched debri infested blood smears of those who are chronically sick with Lyme.

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TNT
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Just realized I didn't see the video you just mentioned up above at 7:20 pm. I saw a different one that I was notified through Youtube that you had recently posted.

So, I will go back and look at these two again sometime soon.

You're doing incredibly awesome work! Keep it up. I am inspired to get myself a good trinocular once I am more able to.

Right now my family either laughs at me or gets grossed out about the things I look at under my 30x lighted magnifying glass.

I was eating organic spinach from Walmart one day and kept noticing this funny taste and then noticed these tiny creepy crawlies.

So, I got out my magnifier and looked at some of these things and had my wife and children look at these "neat" little bugs I had been eating.

No sooner had my wife stuck her eye into the lens that she shrieked, "YOU ARE EATING LITTLE STINKBUGS!!!" All my children were equally grossed out, and now remind me of the time this summer that daddy ate baby stink bugs.

I think they were some kind of aphid. But I'm no insect biologist.

So, I would love to get a good trinocular to look at things and take videos of things with. Particularly of blood. Hopefully in time.

Keep making strides and giving out inspiration!

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Lymedin2010
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Thanks TNT.

That is exactly why I steam or lightly boil my veggies. If you need help choosing a microscope, I can send you links on ones I would buy from time to time. I always buy used, which can be a gamble, but you get most of your money back when you resell it. So it is an investment & place holder for your money until you sell.


Below is my response to phone cameras on microscopy in another thread, in case anyone needs this in the future:


The short answer, Yes & you will get better images/video than I have.


The longer answer is dependent on you. The "magnification" will be dependent on the objective lens & eyepiece of the microscope & not the phone really. The phone will act & see the same thing your eye does when it looks into the eyepiece of the microscope. So in this respect it will be dependent on your microscope & any good lab micro will be good for this.


I know the Galaxy S4 & S5 & the iPhone 5c were reported to have a narrow Field Of View (FOV) & focus to infinity & hence better at maximizing the video capture. How much better or worst they are compared to each other is dependent on a phone by phone basis, but most phones should be able to capture video.


*****TRICKY part #1:*****
This will depend on you. All dependent on the attachment method (Skylight vs DIY setup) the phone may be susceptible to movement, shakiness & displacement, which may force you to constantly readjust.


For instance I tried the Skylight & each time I go to hit the record on the phone the whole setup gets displaced by the slightest movement, forcing me to readjust. The DIY setup should hold it in place better, but it is still up to you to create a solid DIY. I always wanted to make one, but have not as of yet.


*****TRICKY part #2:*****
When you hold the phone up to the eyepiece manually, you don't just hold the phone up to the eyepiece. You have to hold it up & move it up & down until you get the optimal spot. Too high & you get video of the black tube in the peripheral & you lose sight of subject. Too low & you lose more video of your blood cells, so for example you capture 100 cells instead of the normal 200 cells with optimal distance.


The DIY tube will rely on your precision at optimal distance & that is DEPENDENT ON YOU & how well you can do this. The Skylight too, which has clamps for up & down (Z direction) & sliders that EASILY move in X & Y direction (don't forget it can easily get bumped & moved).


If you make a DIY setup, you have to find a PVC or plastic tube that is the right size to fit the eyepiece & just the right size/distance from the eyepiece (precise length cut).


If you build the DIY perfectly to your specs, as based on your test from manually holding the phone, then it will be a more solid choice...less movement.


*****TRICKY part #3:*****
Which is LIGHTING & is true for just viewing with a microscope, as well as with any type of camera attached. You can do a DIY LED light setup or use the bulb setup I showed you in one of my videos. BE WARNED that LED lights are powerful & can burn your retina, especially the small DIY ones. The Cree bulb I show in my video & use has frosting on the bulb & it does not bother my eye, although still use caution.


The same is true for any camera you have (Point & shoot cameras (PNS) or DSLR's), in that you should be able to hold it up with your hands to the eyepiece & record video. There are devices that you can purchase to hold it in place though.


Now compare all this to the other method, which is what I use a Amscope USB cam that just slides in the eyepiece or the trinocular port. Advantage is that it is cut to specifications & all I have to do is just slide it in. Disadvantage is that I cannot capture as beautiful images with crappier resolution & price for better resolving ones.


So all this depends on you!

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PeterKemp
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Dear All,

My latest sets of pictures (and some oldies) are now on flickr. I've been using an FITC antibody stain for b.b. which has worked on some extracellular agents and on white blood cells; the latter being of particular interest to me. There is some text with the 'Albums' explaining what the photos are about:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/76898309@N08/sets/72157648320849440/
If anyone has experience/skill at identifying WBCs, I have included a brightfield/geimsa or Diff Quik stained photo with some sets. I would love to know exactly what some of these cells are.
Best Wishes,
Peter

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Lymedin2010
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From what I can tell for these 2:

https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/76898309@N08/15340558708/in/set-72157648320849440/

https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/76898309@N08/15340317899/in/set-72157648320849440/

They almost look like monocytes or basophils, but mono & baso are typically 12-15 microns & yours is smaller.
Basophils would look a lot busier & have large granules, but if the green stain is foreign (borrelia) then yours is not a baso & yours has a lot of CLEAR cytoplasm (aside from borrelia green stain). Green cytoplasmic contents are cysts & blebs, correct?
Monocytes would have a kidney shaped nucleus or developing one & yours does not look like it does.

So they are Lyphocytes. 7-8 microns for the smaller ones & is a good fit compared to adjacent RBC size comparison. Lymphocytes have agranular clear cytoplasm, but based upon staining yours have what look like spirochetal blebs & cysts? They also account for 30% of WBC’s, while Neutrophils (60+%) & together they make up 90+% of WBC’s in body. So the rest of the WBC’s are rarer.
Also the lymphocytes have fairly rounded nuclei in your pictures & typically have very little cytoplasm. Every now & then we will find one in the blood with more cytoplasm & an irregular nucleus. Yours has slightly more cytoplasmic content, but perhaps it is expanded due to borrelia.
_______________________________________________

https://www.flickr.com/photos/76898309@N08/15340560408/in/set-72157648320849440/
Either a bi-lobed Eosinophil that has lost some content spilling into the plasma, evidenced by the RBC below it degrading from the enzymes. As a result it appears smaller than what an Eosinophil should.

OR

Another Lymphocyte where the nucleus is misformed because of the rupture.

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Lymedin2010
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Are you adding anything to the blood to induce the RBC's to inflate? It does not look like it?

I wonder if BB WBC infection makes the WBC's typically smaller in size than usual & disrupts the nucleus at times, making it more difficult to ID?

The orange stains are acridine orange, correct? Isn't it one of the better indicators of b.b. presence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/76898309@N08/15528967402/in/set-72157648320849440/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6602602

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PeterKemp
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Hi Lymedin, thanks for your observations, I think you are right about the lymphocytes. I frequently see normal-looking lympho's that are smaller than RBCs; though the RBCs in the sample tend towards the large side, often around 8 microns or even more. I also see segmented neutrophils that are perfectly formed examples but no bigger than an RBC.

Some of the cells look like neutrophils with nuclei that are starting to segment, but maybe their progress has been halted by the bb infection. I find your thought about the nucleus being disrupted interesting. It could be that these are all lymphocytes, perhaps at different stages of activation, but that the nucleus is damaged by the cell being 'taken over' by bb.

If bb does take-over the cell, it could explain why the first set of photos from a chocolate-agar culture had intact, infected lympho's but that other WBCs were mostly destroyed as expected. So they would not really be lymphocytes, but the remnants of lymphocytes which have become mini-bb colonies.

Other than the choc-agar culture set, all the others are from thin-film smears of peripheral blood so they should be quite normal looking. The FITC antibody was not buffered and in distilled water (no saline). I guess this could slightly distort the appearance of some cells given the length of time that staining was done.

Thanks again for your ideas.

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PeterKemp
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Just to add, in the photos are included some 'smudge' cells with fluorescence in the cytoplasm. The smudge cells generally look like large lymphocytes and some like segmented neutrophils. The main point being that there are rather a lot of them which suggests to me that there is a problem causing their destruction.
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PeterKemp
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Just to add, in the photos are included some 'smudge' cells with fluorescence in the cytoplasm. The smudge cells generally look like large lymphocytes and some like segmented neutrophils. The main point being that there are rather a lot of them which suggests to me that there is a problem causing their destruction.
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TNT
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Hey Lymedin2010,

I'm just trying to get an idea of what's out there and what is a good deal concerning trinocular microscopes....(ie DREAMING).

Is Omax a good name?

These both look like a good deal:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/OMAX-40X-2000X-Trinocular-LED-Compound-Siedentopf-Microscope-with-Digital-Camera-/400794338851?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d51344623

http://www.amazon.com/OMAX-40X-2000X-Biological-Microscope-Mechanical/dp/B00AEJ9FJ4/ref=pd_sbs_indust_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=0ZW9N3NH1TJ1P9P0RRJY

What do you think? Is the one with the German-sounding optics a better deal than the one with the built-in camera? Any pros and cons?

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Lymedin2010
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Peter, so you are finding infected WBC's often. Personally, I don't see them in other peoples blood who have been bit & who only have a few symptoms. I only find them in mine & they are rare.


I found them in abundance one hour after I take a hot bath & this gives credence to what others have reported of them being imbedded in the skin for protection. Perhaps the heat forces them to leave the skin (& maybe even other areas) & migrate to the blood plasma.


There they are picked up by the WBC's & that is when I see them in abundance. I would really like to know what happens to them long term & whether they are indeed killed off by the WBC long term or whether they truly disrupt the WBC & rupture out.


Microscopy observation might not be the best indicator of the true in vivo nature of the result.


TNT, sure I can help you. I have never heard of Omax, but they seem similar to the Amscope, which are grade "B" type microscope. I did a quick check on Ebay & sometimes great deals can be had, but nothing at the moment.


That 3MP camera is really poor, mine is 9MP & I am still not satisfied with it. Let me check for a better one for you.


In the mean time you can check this how to use a microscope & oil immersion video, but use my oil immersion tutorial.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7KlFSgdUGU

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S13
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Awesome job on your latest video Lymedin2010!
The medusa heads, SOP, blebs, its all identical to what i see here under my own microscope.

I think for me the borrelia infection is pretty much all in cyst form in my blood. The temperature change from drawing the blood (and perhaps other chemical changes) probably activates the cysts to spawn the medusa heads, SOP and blebs. Perhaps these morphological forms are better capable of spreading the infection via the tick?

Anyway, ive posted another time lapse on youtube. This time not of borrelia, but growing candida between human skin cells:
http://youtu.be/l4t7UKi4ma8

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S13
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When looking for a microscope, having a darkfield option really comes in handy when it comes to seeing spirochetes in the blood. Darkfield microscopes should not be more expensive than non-darkfield. The only part that is different is the condenser, which has a (often removable) disc that blocks some of the light rays. Its a very simple technique, but immensely useful.
Most affordable darkfield microscopes only do up to 400x with darkfield. With 1000x the objective is simply too close to the sample for the darkfield technique to work, so they can only do 1000x in brightfield.
But no problem, 400x darkfield shows spirochetes just fine!

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Lymedin2010
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I called Amscope & DRILLED them for what model would work best & I was able to get out of them that the lower models would produce less superior images & the images/view would look blurrier. So stay away from the ones that you linked, because he confessed that for that price point there is a tradeoff on optics & microscope parts (metal vs non metal).


At the end their biggest bang for the buck would be model series B660. If you want darkfield you can always get the darkfield condensor. As was mentioned, you can always interchange condensors & have the best of both worlds. Click on a microscope from the B660 list & then click on a microscope slide image and notice how much clearer the image is than the lower end models from below.
http://www.amscope.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=b660


So that you & others understand, here is a lower/cheaper end model: T490-DK. Click on the darkfield RBC photo & see how BLURRY the image is. So don't get this crap!!!!!!!
http://www.amscope.com/40x-1000x-trinocular-compound-darkfield-microscope.html


The next model up (from the T490-DK) is the T580B-DK. Click on the cell photos & see it is still a bit blurry (So don't get this crap either). You can see spirochetes with this, but it is advantageous to have better optics.
http://www.amscope.com/40x-2000x-professional-darkfield-research-biological-compound-microscope.html


If you want a brand new microscope you can buy the B660 Amscope series, but personally I think better used microscopes can be had for cheaper. I would wait & I can start linking you to some. I just scored my new scope that is typically $1,000-$1,200 for 1/3 the cost, but because I had patience.

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Lymedin2010
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Thanks S13.

It is crazy that I captured all that from one video (the last medusa colony) & I don't know of any other such revealing all-in-one video like it. This is what I was expecting/waiting to see from others all along. If you know of any such video, please link us...I would LOVE to see it.

When I look at my 40x via eye, it is very hard to spot a spirochetes & the majority of them are missed. If the spirochete is larger then I can see it if I strain my eyes. BUT when I have my camera on, then I can see it. The cameras optics allows for more than 400x magnification & at this point it can be seen. Each camera is a bit different in how it resolves & magnifies the image, but most cameras will magnify what is seen via eye.

The beauty of your 40x + camera setup is that you have a more wide field of view & the video is not as blurry. You are not struggling to focus constantly, as I am with 100x.

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Lymedin2010
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This is the type of external blood treatment that I was referring to much earlier when I started this thread. I believe the future of Lyme treatment will involve direct blood impact of some sort & then successive filtration to rid of pathogen particles & toxins that the external blood impact will release.


Patient cured of Ebola in Germany treated with biofiltration device
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/11/14/patient-cured-ebola-in-germany-treated-with-bio-filtration-device/


Artificial Spleen ‘Cleans’ Blood of Pathogens:
http://singularityhub.com/2014/10/11/artificial-spleen-cleans-blood-of-pathogens/?utm_source=Singularity+University+Lists&utm_campaign=6714861c1b-Newsletter_October2014&utm_medium= email&utm_term=0_9c706260a1-6714861c1b-57375953


This is what I said months ago on page 2 of this thread, "I also think that the future of Lyme will be in blood treatment. So one can use an IV line & let the blood be stored in an external container, HEATED & treated (with things such as ozone), dialysis type filtration & then transfused back into the blood stream in a continuous loop."


This may not be a direct cure, but it may be just enough to get your blood clean, White Blood Cells fighting again & enough to get you over the hump into healing land. The rest of the infection can then be cleaned up by ABX and/or herbals.


For others it will be life-long continuous treatment.

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Lymedin2010
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Cool video of WBC's attacking a parasite.
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152126525726937&fref=nf

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Haley
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That last video is pretty cool lymed2010.

I've always thought that parasites may be the most difficult to eradicate because they are so large that the immune system can not knock them down . Obviously that is not the case here, it appears the immune system CAN attack those suckers!

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Lymedin2010
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Thanks Haley.


Normally parasites are handled or managed well by our functioning immune system, but our Lyme inflicted bodies are immunosuppressed & may not be able to handle parasites as efficiently (or at all) the way this video shows.


Check out this new bulb I use for observations now:

-Produces less heat than the previous bulb.
-It is flat & can fit on many more & most of microscopes.
-It is dimmable.
-It has a frosty coating around the bulb, so you won't burn your retina out.

(Philips SlimStyle 60W Equivalent Daylight (5000K) A19 Dimmable LED Light Bulb (E*) Model # 433235)
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-SlimStyle-60W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-A19-Dimmable-LED-Light-Bulb-E-433235/205128422


Check out another good live microscopy video, where they find spirochetes in someones blood that is taking multiple antibiotics.


The dancing strings with the bulbous tips are the spirochetes & the free floating "dots" can be platelets, lipids, WBC lysosomes, blebs, & cysts. It is hard to tell what is what from the video, but based upon the sheer quantity (when compared to normal blood) many may indeed be blebs & cysts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN_W9K5Wt_0

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Lymedin2010
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Good study.

"Experimental studies in dogs, mice, and non-human primates have found persistence of B. burgdorferi DNA following treatment with a variety of antibiotics, but persisting spirochetes are non-cultivable."


Meaning that despite their presence, that they could not culture them. When they allowed a tick to bite an infected animal (in xenodiagnosis), the tick picked up borrelia & provided evidence of ongoing & chronic infection.


"Despite the continued non-cultivable state, RNA transcription of multiple B. burgdorferi genes was detected in host tissues, flaB DNA was acquired by xenodiagnostic ticks, and spirochetal forms could be visualized within ticks and mouse tissues by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, respectively."


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24466286

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Haley
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I am in the process of buying a microscope. Just bringing this back up so I can go through the majority of these posts. I seem to have some energy to research this now (finally).

Do any of these posts have skin samples? I am wondering if there may be help for us in skin biopsies as opposed to blood. I know that parasites can be seen in the skin, I just have to learn how to identify them.

Is there is a book that shows tropical diseases or the like under a microscope? Any recommendation for a textbook that identifies strange pathogens?

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Lymedin2010
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No posts on here on skin biopsies. You can look up histopathology or histopathology of the skin books. Some are very expensive, so best you buy a used one such as this.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Atlas-and-Synopsis-of-Levers-Histopathology-of-the-Skin-Miller-III-MD-O-Fred-/361164780636?pt=US_Nonfiction_Book&hash=item541719345c


_____________________________________
This one is a very good microscope. Don't forget that you will get back more than half of your money when reselling the microscope.

REICHERT A/O MICROSTAR IV TRINOCULAR
http://www.ebay.com/itm/REICHERT-A-O-MICROSTAR-IV-TRINOCULAR-/181627616964?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a49d97ec4


_____________________________________
Also, don't forget this LED bulb, as I highly recommend it for microcopy & it will produce much better visualizations, images, & video.

(Philips SlimStyle 60W Equivalent Daylight (5000K) A19 Dimmable LED Light Bulb (E*) Model # 433235)
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-SlimStyle-60W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-A19-Dimmable-LED-Light-Bulb-E-433235/205128422

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Lymedin2010
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"spirochetes were observed in cultures of genital secretions from 11 of 13 subjects diagnosed with Lyme disease, and motile spirochetes were detected in genital culture concentrates from 12 of 13 Lyme disease patients using light and darkfield microscopy."


Culture and identification of Borrelia spirochetes in human vaginal and seminal secretions
http://f1000research.com/articles/3-309/v1#reflist

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Haley
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Thank you Lymedin2010. I bought the book and am watching the scope, haven't bid on it yet. I will get the bulb also.

[ 01-06-2015, 12:09 AM: Message edited by: Haley ]

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Lymedin2010
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Thank you Peter Kemp!


"These video clips are from an experiment in which 11 friends provided a tiny amount of fingertip blood on a microscope slide. All donors were met through patient support groups and have chronic illness.


8 of 11 have been ill for 20 years or longer.
9 have been diagnosed with M.E. or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome


10 of 11 had negative NHS tests for Lyme borreliosis - one was not tested.
9 had private tests that were positive.


These eleven donors represent a total of 235 years of illness and 170 years of lost productivity."


http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/MeetingMicroscopy.html

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Lymedin2010
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Surface protein staining of bb.

 -
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/36371/title/Image-of-the-Day--Lyme-Disease-Bacteria/


DNA imaging probes for Borrelia.

https://cloud.gonitro.com/p/iaaxzXsfbUBRef55xbwmcM

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TNT
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If gamers can learn to identify pictures of malaria-infected red blood cells, why can't we?

http://www.malaria.com/news/malaria-diagnosis-game

Play an Online Game to Help Diagnose Malaria
JUNE 23, 2014 BY MALARIA.COM

Online crowd-sourcing — in which a task is presented to the public, who respond, for free, with various solutions and suggestions — has been used to evaluate potential consumer products, develop software algorithms and solve vexing research-and-development challenges. But diagnosing infectious diseases?

Working on the assumption that large groups of public non-experts can be trained to recognize infectious diseases with the accuracy of trained pathologists, researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have created a crowd-sourced online gaming system in which players distinguish malaria-infected red blood cells from healthy ones by viewing digital images obtained from microscopes.

The UCLA team found that a small group of non-experts playing the game (mostly undergraduate student volunteers) was collectively able to diagnosis malaria-infected red blood cells with an accuracy that was within 1.25 percent of the diagnostic decisions made by a trained medical professional.

The game, which can be accessed on cell phones and personal computers, can be played by anyone around the world, including children.

“The idea is, if you carefully combine the decisions of people — even non-experts — they become very competitive,” said Aydogan Ozcan, an associate professor of electrical engineering and bioengineering and the corresponding author of the crowd-sourcing research. “Also, if you just look at one person’s response, it may be OK, but that one person will inevitably make some mistakes. But if you combine 10 to 20, maybe 50 non-expert gamers together, you improve your accuracy greatly in terms of analysis.”

Crowd-sourcing, the UCLA researchers say, could potentially help overcome limitations in the diagnosis of malaria, which affects some 210 million people annually worldwide and accounts for 20 percent of all childhood deaths in sub-Saharan Africa and almost 40 percent of all hospitalizations throughout that continent.

The current gold standard for malaria diagnosis involves a trained pathologist using a conventional light microscope to view images of cells and count the number of malaria-causing parasites. The process is very time-consuming, and given the large number of cases in resource-poor countries, the sheer volume presents a big challenge. In addition, a significant portion of cases reported in sub-Sahara Africa are actually false positives, leading to unnecessary and costly treatments and hospitalizations.

By training hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of members of the public to identify malaria through UCLA’s crowd-sourced game, a much greater number of diagnoses could be made more quickly — at no cost and with a high degree of collective accuracy.

“The idea is to use crowds to get collectively better in pathologic analysis of microscopic images, which could be applicable to various telemedicine problems,” said Sam Mavandadi, a postdoctoral scholar in Ozcan’s research group and the study’s first author.

Ozcan and Mavandadi emphasized that the same platform could be applied to combine the decisions of minimally trained health care workers to significantly boost the accuracy of diagnosis, which is especially promising for telepathology, among other telemedicine fields.

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joey2020
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Have you ever heard about a lizard in CA that cures lyme in ticks? I wonder if you you get bit by one of the ticks that have bit the lizard and there for is caring the anti-bodies to kill lyme. What if that tick that is now caring anti bodies bites you will he inject you with anti-bodies and there fore letting your immune system pick up the anti-bodie and become cure?

the reason I ask is, I have hunting buddies that get bit by tens of ticks for the last 20 years and they seem to be find no symptoms of any sort?

I wonder if they got bit by one of the ticks carrying anti-bodies?

I would like to get some ticks with lyme, draw some blood from them see if they have lyme, then let it bite one of the lizards and see if it really does become cure of lyme?


http://lymedisease.org/news/hardscienceonlyme/657.html

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TNT
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Bringing this thread back up. I'm hoping the veterans have something to share.

Also, I have a question.

Have been viewing my blood and family members' for over two months now. No problem seeing ketes, candida, probable parasites and protozoa (dots and holes inside RBCs and formations like "Maltese Crosses"), probable BLO on outside of RBCs, and biofilms.

I had initially only been viewing with a friend's older lab-grade scope that only had light-field view. Now, I got myself an older lab-grade dark field/light field scope (good deal on Ebay), and have been viewing between the two scopes.

My question is this:

What are those shiny twirling, flipping, rotating triangular objects that appear to perhaps have a lobe on each corner. Every one of these objects are identical, no matter how many I see. Sometimes there are few of these things, sometimes very many.

They are not what I have seen referred to as "lysozomes" (granules from the WBC). They are about 3-5x bigger than the "lysozomes," but still very small. The lysozomes violently bounce around (when no longer part of the WBC), whereas these things twirl around as they travel (and they are never still).

They seem to me to be native to the blood, and I'm hoping they are not pathogenic.

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TNT
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The little flipping white things at 2:01 on this video. This man claims they are bacteria.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40mvty0EM2o

Here is a fuzzy close-up of what I am referring to. Notice and follow the flipping object at the top middle of his screen at 4:50 to 5:12.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzPrnkaw4k

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TNT
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Haley,

Did you get a scope?

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Lymedin2010
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TNT, I will call you and we can discuss some of your questions.
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lymenotlite
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http://www.wildcondor.com/dr-horowitz-on-babesiosis.html

Dr. H says this about babesia testing:

"And then for Babesia, you use a panel approach, a Giemsa stain, a Babesia immune-fluorescent assay, IFA for Babesia Microti, an IFA for Babesia Duncani, WA1, a PCR looking for the DNA, polymerase chain reaction, a FISH testing. There’s five Babesia tests."

Has anyone done any of these? I assume that special and expensive equipment would be needed for some.

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TNT
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I'm afraid what I'm seeing in my blood IS pathogenic and not native.

The flipping, twirling merozoites in these videos look like the exact things I'm seeing in my plasma.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MYmNaufItU&safe=active

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3DSB1xXuec

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKEGZCZqZ_w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSH_rua1hh8

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TNT
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I wanted to make a correction about what kind of microscope I have. I am so new to this that I originally thought that mine was darkfield/lightfield. I have come to realize that what I have is actually a phase contrast/lightfield scope. I have really fallen in love with this thing. I think phase contrast gives more detail than a darkfield, although I realize I have never used a darkfield [bonk] but can only compare what I'm seeing to the pictures/video from darkfield scopes.

I'm also seeing what is referred to as yeast. S13, are you seeing any stuff like this? I'm referring to the white circles, not what the arrow is pointing to.

 -

Another candida pic:
 -

I think some of the pictures they refer to bacteria and mold are actually platelets/clumps of platelets.

http://www.morgellonsdiseaseawareness.com/live_blood_microscopy

The pictures of this blood (the "black & white" pics) appear to be with a phase contrast scope. These are very much like what I see under my scope, although I think I can focus better than some of these. [Cool]

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Haley
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Yes I would agree, that is yeast.
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S13
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im actually not sure about that. It may be yeast or a byproduct from it, i dont know. I have seen more people claim that it is yeast, so there may be some truth to it.

Perhaps you could culture these objects and see if they start to grow in to fungal forms? Then perhaps we know more.

Like ive posted in the parasite warriors topic, these objects float in my blood:

 -

Its a time lapse done manually (that was before i got my new usb camera), but it does show some interesting growth.
Its the "true" hyphae form (as opposed to a "pseudo" hyphae form) of candida. Identical to what is shown here:

 -
Source: http://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/v3/n12/box/nrg948_BX1.html

So this is obviously candida in the blood.

It seems like these hyphae forms start to develop from objects about the same size as a RBC (~7um) or a bit smaller. These roundish objects look a lot more faint than normal RBCs. That seems to be in accordance with your observations of the yeast in your phase contrast pictures.
So yes, we are maybe looking at the same thing! However, in your case the candida would still be in its less harmful yeast state.

Btw, nice that you have a phase contrast microscope! Those things do give more contrast than a darkfield. What type of microscope did you say you were using?

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TNT
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Thanks, S13. If you are seeing the pseudohyphae in your blood, does it gently wave around like seaweed in water? The stuff I'm seeing gently waves around.

If so, does it have that delineating cross-section line at the base of the hyphae like what is shown in your pictures above? I'm not seeing any delineation.

I see neutrophils gobbling the balls of "candida" up (if the candida is not too big).

I'm also seeing something very similar to the stuff that is waving around, but it is different. This other stuff very much appears to be thick, faint, spirochetes anchored in what appears to be cysts. The "cysts" are about 1-2 um in diameter and are not necessarily uniform in roundness. The "spirochetes" spin and move just like real spirochetes. I am suspecting these could be l-form borrelia, especially since they appear to be anchored in a cyst. These "ketes" appear to be approx. 3-6 um in lenth (about the same length of many spirochetes).

My scope is an American Optical. I definitely like the phase contrast! I would like to get a usb camera eventually, too. Then I could do time lapse.

Hey, has anyone seen or heard from Lymedin2010? I'm a bit concerned about him. I tried to contact him a few times and have not heard back. Hope he is alright!

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S13
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Tbh it has been a couple of months a go that i took those hyphae pictures, so i dont remember if they where waving or not.

This video i made earlier from the pseudohyphae shows the fungi is pretty solid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlAYKAR9X2Q

But then i also have this video of what i thought was borrelia string of pearls:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObT6IHXHVFw
But maybe this is also a fungal candida form? Now that i look at it, it sure does have a lot of similarities with fungal organisms. And these chains are waving a lot as you can see.

The green line that is shown in the candida example is a fluorescent marker of a protein. Im not sure if you can see that under dark field. And besides, the pictures i took are not clear enough to distinguish them. I will try to look for more of these hyphal cells and see if i can find the seperation line.

Nice that your neutrophils are eating the yeast! That at least proves it something that doesnt belong in the blood.

I havent seen Lymedin2010 in a while.

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TNT
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Those are awesome videos!

No, I think you are right about the string of pearls. That looks like a kete for sure. It looks very much like what I'm seeing come out of "cysts." It's just that SOME of the emerging "ketes" I'm seeing don't look completely like some of the other typical spirochetes free floating in the serum. But, most do.

And your fungi video looks pretty straightforward, too.

I have thought that there is a small possibility that the "candida" balls I'm seeing are lipids. But, lipids would probably be shinier like the tiny droplets of immersion oil that get dispersed at the edge of the field when using oil.

I might eventually post some of my findings. I'm just a bit leary of posting personal info in a way that the whole world can see. It was a stretch for me to post on a public forum at the beginning.

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Lymedin2010
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Hi guys, sorry I have not been here for a while & I will resume microscopy real soon. Mold forced me out of my house & it has been months worth of migrating & running.


Months ago I too captured what appear to be yeast. At first I thought they were the shrunken & ghosted RBC's that I spoke about in my video. Some are RBC's, while some are non human and expand & give rise to daughter cells. It is hard to tell them apart most times.


My next venture will be culturing borrelia directly from our blood via a cheap & readily available method. Once I get it down packed, I will share with you & you should be able to culture the classical burrowing spirochetes via this method.


Directly from Alan MacDonald about microscopy & DNA Probe Hybridization:

"Dear Ruth,
I send to you a personal note to thanks for your very kind donation to support my research.
It is clear to me , as it is to you and to many others that
blood Testing is not a reliable method for the diagnosis of recent or or Remote Lyme borrelia Infection. DNA Probe testing of body tissuesin biopsy,or of blood smears under the microscope or of
spinal fluid under the microscope with Accurate DNa probes is the method of choice in the 21st century.
My Molecular Beacon Dna Probes have proven that
patients with disease, chronic type, and Borrelia induced by infection, is best handled with the Use of DNa probe hybridization testing ( my FISH method).
Such Testing gives extremely valuable information, which can be obtained in no other way,and assists the physician in making a diagnosis , either for aor against Borrelia infection in patients who seek diagnosis and care.
I will use your gift to expand the number of DNA Probes for strains of Borrelia which are curently producing Real Disease in patients, but inwhich today's blood tests return NEGATIVE Antibody test results.
Always bear in Mind, that :
NEGATIVE Lab testing results are
MEANINGLESS. Only positive and reliable Tests Really help patients.
Gratefully ,
Alan"

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TNT
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Hey Lymedin2010,

It's good to have you back!! I'm glad you are ok, but sorry about your mold/house issue. I hope you can get that remedied somehow so that you can live in your own house.

This thread has not been as active without you. I'm considering posting some of my findings, but wish there was a way other than youtube (since they are mostly videos).

I got an awesome capture of a bart-like bacteria attacking a SOP kete... boy, was that bacteria MAD! I don't know what the kete did, but as I watched, I was glad I wasn't the kete. He would not let him get away! The kete was getting pummeled! I wish I knew what kind of bacteria it was that was attacking.

I don't think strep, staph, or brucella are motile, so it must have been a bart-type organism. It appeared to be slightly dumb-bell shaped and approx. 1 um in length.

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Lymedin2010
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Thanks TNT.


Great to hear you have made progress with your own discoveries & it sounds that you are content with your decision to dive into borrelia hunting via microscopy?


It shows us how distasteful & macabre medicine has become and how easily doctors are willing to take our monies & co-payments whilst pushing us through the revolving door of Hotel Chronic Infection.


I cannot wait for you to post some of your work so that we can all enjoy, marvel, & learn from. If you like you can send me your finished product & I can post for you?


I too see additional organisms, but it is difficult to know what they are exactly.


I wonder if this great video is from Peter Kemp? It looks like he is incorporating staining for proof & those stains are not cheap.

https://plus.google.com/u/0/105345895299559481000/posts/1BpgpCk686X?cfem=1

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Lymedin2010
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BTW, yes that is Peter Kemp's work & here is the original posted video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgSo8tSV1uY

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TNT
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Thanks, Lymedin2010. I can't wait to share some of my finds. I'm about as anxious as a schoolboy waiting to show his buddies his pet frog! Though, I'm afraid my videos will be quite humbling compared to some others' on here.

That fluorescent stain video is awesome! The clarity is SUPERB! Peter Kemp is definitely in the big leagues.

Since most of you post on youtube, is that the easiest and safest place to make personal videos public? Is there a size limit?

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Lymedin2010
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There are 2 viable options between Vimeo & Youtube, the latter of which has a heck of a lot more monthly viewers.

http://www.amsterdamprinting.com/blog/2015/03/17/vimeo-vs-youtube-what-you-need-to-know/


TNT, you have superpowers & you don't even know it! Besides seeing the world in slow motion because of the chronic exhaustion and stymied pace & being able to sniff out mold & chemicals through chemical sensitivity, you should now realize that you can touch someone with the right force & transfer them what is in your blood.


I don't think anyone, seeing what is in our blood, would want to make direct contact with us. But all kidding aside, if the big guns have not touched the many professionals who are attempting to turn the tides of Lyme, then I think they could care less about you & I.


Make a Youtube account & do not reveal your true name & connect it to a new email account that you should create in conjunction with the youtube account. Then post & feel free with your superpowers [Smile]

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Lymedin2010
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“Our latest findings indicate that the bacteria can literally outrun our immune cells within the host,” Wooten said. “We figured they would get in the skin and go hide from our immune response. Actually, we are finding that they don’t hide. They continue to move for months or years, and our immune system isn’t clearing them. Why is that? That is what we hope to unravel.”

http://utnews.utoledo.edu/index.php/07_17_2015/ut-microbiologist-seeks-better-treatments-for-lyme-disease-with-immune-response-research

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TNT
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That's an interesting article Lymedin. I find the same thing in my blood. The neutrophils readily gather up the candida and other "artifacts," but completely ignore and go right past a kete. It's very depressing if I dwell on it.

So, it's encouraging to see this microbiologist has a found a way to study this phenomenon. Of course, it has to be mentioned in relation to a vaccine!!! [Roll Eyes]

When will the profiteering stop with this disease!!! [Mad]

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TNT
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I know you all are going to start getting miffed at me for not sharing these videos (I'm working towards that), but I couldn't wait tell about this find!

Much to my horror and delight, I finally got video of a bacteria with flagella-3 bacteria in fact! You can CLEARLY see the multiple flagella on the bacteria and see it motoring with them. Two of the bacteria are kind of intertwined but their flagella are distinct. The 3rd one was by itself and very clear to see its whipping "tails" as it moved through the plasma!

INCREDIBLE!!!

What I found interesting is that lysozomes (the little immune particles from the WBCs) were attacking the flagella of the one bacteria.

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TNT
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This picture is similar to what the flagella looked like except my bacteria were round, not rod-shaped. And, of course, I don't have near the magnification and resolution as this. Nevertheless, it is unmistakable!

This photo is from the bartonella.org website.


 -

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TNT
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Like I said, I am anxious to share my videos, and am working on getting them available. I am also working towards getting equipped with 1000x or more (even 1500x) with my dark phase contrast. I just bought a 100x dark phase objective, and am working on obtaining the other necessities for this.

So, hopefully before too long I (and you all) will benefit from images and videos that will be closer (only closer, sigh) to the pic of that bartonella posted above.

Man, it would have been awesome to have gotten that flagella footage of mine with 1500x dark phase instead of just 400x!

I feel like Galileo wishing for a bigger telescope, lol.

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Lymedin2010
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TNT, I too have seen WBC's go right past candida & borrelia. At times though I see WBC's with candida & partly degrades candida vesicles within them, indicating that they must have the surface proteins/antibodies to be able to sweep them up.


We have heard that borrelia suppresses the immune system & perhaps that is why most of the WBC's go past the spiros. Its more clever approach is its retreat into our cells, where our WBC's can't get into.


"The bacteria that cause Lyme disease are able to trick the immune system into not launching a full-blown immune response or developing lasting immunity to the disease, a new study with mice shows."
http://www.futurity.org/lyme-disease-ticks-immune-systems-954232/

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Lymedin2010
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Great find on the bart & can't wait to see your videos!!!


I have never seen a flagella whipping organism in my blood as of yet. I have seen what may be babesia, but it is difficult to say for sure with live RBC's & without staining.


I have seen what lymephotos are calling Horseshoe mites in my blood, at least 6-8 of them when I first started microscopy, but that was early on in my treatment & I have not seen any since.


 -


More pics here.... http://lymephotos.com/mites/index.html


I have also seen something that resembles an amoeba, but it may have been an underdeveloped phagocyte.

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Lymedin2010
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Here is a rare time when one of my WBC's picked up a spirochete.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GCUFjYY3zs

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TNT
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Lymedin2010, I think you get really good quality brightfield view. Must be the Zeiss optics and the brighter light.

The only thing that salvages my scope is the phase contrast. As the name implies, the technique gives very good visual contrast, and things like ketes really stand out in phase.

The WBC in that video must be a lymphocyte. It's too small and regular shaped to be a neutrophil, although I think I see one come into the field and leave again on the left side.

This answers a question I have had for a while. Apparently some of you find that your lymphocytes are traveling around and "eating" pathogens. I have not seen that yet, only with neutrophils.

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Lymedin2010
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TNT, yes it is the objective Zeiss optics that shine on my scope. BUT with the built-in halogen bulbs the image is not as sharp & well lit as it should be. The LED lighting takes it to the next level, just watch out not to burn your eyes out. My USB video camera comes in handy in this respect.


The blebs are the most difficult to spot out of all the morphologies, then comes the cysts & then the full grown spiros.


If you look at the video from my last post, on the WBC that picks up the spiro, there you can see that the WBC is filled with these dark/black & filled dots, but I cannot tell those dark dots from the lysosomes or sometimes lipid droplets & that is why it is hard to know for sure.


One can never really know when it comes to blebs, as you can with the longer & full bodied spiros. One can only gain more suspicion where you see many cut up pieces of borrelia (part of borrelia body + blebs along the body AND many other what may look like blebs or spores in the plasma). Then you can say to yourself, this is MORE LIKELY to be a bleb or spore.


Alternatively, if you really want to prove that it is indeed a bleb. Then you should collect it & grow it in culture media & do some time lapse to see it develop into a full spiro. This is on my list & is what is available from our limited resources. If you had more money & resources, then you could do PCR, DNA probing. or immuno staining, which is always better than a visual to nail down the EXACT type of spirochete we are dealing with.


As I pointed out early when I started this thread I think the growth goes from bleb, to tailed-bleb, to dumbbell shaped, long dummbells & then really long ones. Not all of them get to be long & really long spirochetes, since the internal conditions might force them to become cysts or undergo String of Pearl formation & break apart.

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TNT
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quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Alternatively, if you really want to prove that it is indeed a bleb. Then you should collect it & grow it in culture media & do some time lapse to see it develop into a full spiro.

I'm afraid I can't.... I don't have tweezers that small. [dizzy] [Wink] [Big Grin] [lol]

Sorry, I couldn't resist!

Seriously, though, that seems like it would be quite the undertaking.

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Lymedin2010
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No need to get those tweezers dirty with borrelia filth. They make affordable micro-pipettes. [Big Grin]
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Lymedin2010
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Fluorescent dyes of bb exiting mouse capillary wall.


I wonder if bb is more aggressive & spiraling when first introduced into humans & becomes less aggressive & spiraling over time? Perhaps it is some component in the blood that inhibits its aggression, which in turn makes it more difficult to treat in humans?


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2408724/bin/ppat.1000090.s007.swf

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TNT
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I have been looking around to find out possibly what bacteria those cocci were, and I'm reading that most cocci DO NOT have flagella.

So, does anyone know which cocci bacteria have flagella?

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S13
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Are you sure its not just a protozoa?
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Lymedin2010
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Questions:
1) What magnification are you using to view them ?

2) What size do you think the organism is (.5-1 microns)?

3) Do you see the organism right away after live blood prep, or does it come out sometime after?

4) Does it grow, morph, change shape or form in any way over time?


At times at lower magnification even bacilli can look like coccoids, some bacilli start off looking more like cocci early during the life cycle too & then grow more rod like, just take a look at this Vibrio cholerae video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TWRFF79YsM


This one is a comma-shaped rod & is a predatorial bacteria, Bdellovibrio.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kLQslIAfxs

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Lymedin2010
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Without higher magnification we can mistake a rod for a cocci. If one has leaky gut & lowered immune system it can really be any number of organisms. In my experience no professional that I have asked has been able to identify any cocci. Not when I have asked, nor when others who have identified COCCI organisms in their blood & have asked other professionals.


I would buy more clues & perhaps do some time lapse to get closer to the truth. Cocci are the hardest to identify without knowing more.

You mentioned "triangular" shaped in your previous posts. The only thing that I have seen in my blood that is oddly shaped, so not a cocci, rod, spiral, but "imperfectly" round are the following possibilities:

1)Shrunken & ghosted RBC's
2)Borrelia cyst


Some of the borrelia cysts appear more roundish & hollow, while some look more solid & have edges that stick out & can appear triangular for lack of a better term.


Here is a borrelia cyst that is more hollow, does it look like this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOrbEnFeT1k

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Lymedin2010
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Your rod shaped with multi-flagella might be Helicobacter Pylori (if magnification is low). This is a common tertiary infection with Lymies & usually in the gut & lives at lowered ph.


With leaky gut & lowered immune it might have traveled from gut into blood stream. How often do you find these in your blood?


It would be really interesting if it was bartonella & you would be the first I have heard of this from live blood microscopy. I have never seen them live in anyones blood, nor those who have made their own videos.


 -

 -

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Lymedin2010
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This is how they can look more cocci rather than bacilli under lower magnification.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nB4O74X5Uw


Here is bartonella hensleae, does it look like this?
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[ 07-28-2015, 10:38 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]

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TNT
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quote:
Originally posted by S13:
Are you sure its not just a protozoa?

Could easily be, except with phase contrast, I can usually see nuclei pretty well, and this (these) had no nucleus.

In relation to some of Lymedin's questions, I was viewing under 400x, but zoomed in with my camera to about 4000x. My camera is only a 6mp, so when completely zoomed in, the image quality is not extremely clear. But, when zoomed out or only part way in, the image is fairly crisp, but not very close.

Interestingly, the flagellum are clearer when zoomed out (I guess because of image distortion).

As for size of the organism, let me look again.

I would say .5-1.0um. Definitely no larger than 1um, and almost perfectly round.

The plasma had very slight current at that spot, and the organisms had the flagellum pointed mostly "downstream." In other words, the flagellum were pointed in the direction they were moving.

The shape and amount of flagellum were consistent with this pic. Though, my "cocci" were very bright.

 -

The organisms did not look like these:

 -


The top pic is a cocci bacteria, and the bottom pic (with nuclei) are trichomonas.

I really need to get my videos posted. I will try to work on that.

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Eight Legs Bad
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Have not had time to read all the posts here, but for those of you interested in microscopy, Dr Alan MacDonald has recently found TWO different Borrelia in the autopsy brain tissue of Alzheimer's Disease victims.

He found both Bb and B. miyamotoi. The Borrelia were labelled with Molecular Beacon DNA Probes specific for each species - the most accurate technology known for identifying bacteria.

These are stunning findings, so important. Dr M is now launching a crowdfunding campaign so that he can test the body fluids and biopsy tissues of LIVING people. Please see my other post here for more info:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=132256;p=0

I hope you all will support Dr M's fundraiser and circulate the message far and wide - his work could potentially bring hope to millions.
Elena

--------------------
Justice will be ours.

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TNT
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I'm sorry this is not very good quality published. I lost some video quality in the upload. Did you guys have trouble with your published videos having less resolution than your actual videos? Is there something I'm doing wrong? My videos look much better on my computer before publishing (Of course, actual viewing is even clearer).

Anyways, here is one of the bacteria with the flagellum. Notice also the very long kete.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEQnmNKVt6w


And, here is a bacteria from the same sample that appears to be bart-like. But, it has no flagellum that I could see.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOftWSU92fY

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TNT
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S13, I was looking again at some of your videos and am curious how you got that one with candida growing on dead skin cells.

I think that one would have been a difficult one to catch. And how/why were you looking at dead skin cells in the first place?

Maybe I don't want to know, lol....but I'm very curious.

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