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Author Topic: Lyme Disease Obituaries
trueblue
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James Sanders, 55, Pennsylvania

From TOFU, INC. the Gettysburg Support Group

Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 14:51:53 -0700 (PDT)
From: Lovette Mott
Subject: URGENT: Death of James Sanders
To: editor@gburgtimes.com

Once again I am forced to wipe away the tears of pain and anger due to the untimely death of our dear friend, James Sanders, who at age 55 succumbed to Lyme Disease. How many more of us must die before the doctors and this community and our politicians wake up to the seriousness of this illness? Maybe 1 death per year isn't enough. Wasn't Ted Kotula enough? Now James Sanders? How many memorials must we attend and have in honor of people with this disease before the medical profession wakes up and helps us.

No, it's not fibromyalgia, no it's not MS, no it's not the flu, no it's not ALS, no it's not anemia, no it's not chronic fatigue, no it's not early arthritis, no it's not ADHD - IT IS LYME DISEASE and all of the coinfections that go along with it. And it is an EPIDEMIC.

I call on every school official to get the facts to help the children of this town, I call on every minister in this town to help the afflicted, most of whom don't know where to turn, I call on every parent to check their kids every day for ticks. I call on the doctors once again to step up to the plate and learn about this complex disease which is now killing people.

If you aren't sure if you have it, then come to our meeting this Sunday, September 5th at the Community Room of Gettysburg Hospital from 1-4 pm. We'll have a doctor speak to us and we'll be happy to help you even if no one else will.

Lovette Mott
Biglerville, PA
334-6339

We just came back from Gettysburg after attending his memorial service. The pastor was very good and kept saying how sick he was from the lyme disease which eventually caused his series of strokes. He tried to work and did his best. He also tried many alternatives meds too. We always enjoyed to hear what was new that he was trying.

We cannot let this continue. There must be a better way to get our message out before other people die from this disease.

I met Jim several times at the support group and I forget how many years he had lyme. Yes, he did work w/ a lyme specialist in md. that is well known. I just can't remember all the particulars of what he'd been on. Jim was distressed in beg. of August his job was requiring folks to work lots of overtime. He was thinking about quitting....What a sweet soul he was, he'll be missed!!!

James Sanders was 55 and was on all kinds of meds and went to 2 LLMDs. He tried it all.

Thank you all. I will again print off the messages and send to his two children. He had two baby grandchildren also.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=010773

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more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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trueblue
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Jenny Umphress, 21

July 16, 1973 - August 26, 1994

Jenny Umphress contracted Lyme Disease when she was 15 years old. For the next six years she fought Lyme disease with all her strength. Shortly before she died, she asked her Mother for a final promise. Susan Umphress said "No." at the time, because she did not know how close Jenny was to death. After Jenny died, Susan Umphress was haunted by her wish- and so she fulfilled it. Jenny's wish was for her mother to write her story, so that no teenager would have to go through what she went through.

As a Lyme disease patient, Jenny was subjected often to Doctors who did not know anything about Lyme disease and treated her badly. As with so many others, Doctor after Doctor did not help but only made her situation worse by telling her family she was not sick.

Until she was completely debilitated, the family could not find anyone to help them. Jenny's health disintegrated.

One Doctor, insisting she was not physically ill but psychosomatic, slapped her face, telling her to "Grow up!"

At various times, Jenny was completely bedridden, confined to a wheelchair and in terrible, terrible pain. At one point, she suffered complete amnesia from which she never recovered. She suffered great physical pain from Lyme disease, but also intense emotional pain at the insensitivity and ignorance of some of the medical personnel she depended on to help her.

While she was awake and having portacath surgery, a Doctor mocked her by saying, "Yeah, Lyme Disease is fatal. Ha ha ha!"

Well, for Jenny Lyme disease *was* fatal.

She died at 21.

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Melanie Reber
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Sarah Minor, 44

Sarah, a lyme patient, took her own life by carbon monoxide poisoning and narcotic overdose.

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Scott Brazil, 50, California


'Shield' Director/Producer Dies
Scott Brazil, 50, suffered from ALS

April 19, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Scott Brazil, an executive producer and director of FX's series "The Shield," has died.

Brazil, a two-time winner at both the Emmys and the Golden Globes, died Monday at Sherman Oaks Hospital in Los Angeles of complications from ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and Lyme disease, news reports say. He was 50.

A veteran of such shows as "Hill Street Blues" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," Brazil has been with "The Shield" since it premiered in 2002. He directed 11 episodes of the series, including the premiere and finale for seasons two, three and four. As a producer, he shared in the show's 2003 Golden Globe win for best drama series.

"Scott was a tremendous man, a loyal friend, a creative producer and the best director we had. However, he rarely got the credit he deserved for all those things, because he never actively sought it out," says Shawn Ryan, creator of "The Shield." "The full range of his humanity and talents was fully known only to those of us who had the privilege of working side by side with him every day. His loss is devastating to us personally and to the television industry, professionally."

Peter Ligouri, the former president of FX who's now head of FOX, says it was an honor to have worked with Brazil.

"I cannot think of anyone who engendered more affection, admiration and respect than Scott," Ligouri says. "He fiercely guarded the creative vision of 'The Shield' and zealously supported and loved all of his associates. He never drew attention to himself, and he deserves the ovation that we have for him in our hearts."

In addition to the Golden Globe for "The Shield," Brazil shared in two outstanding drama series Emmys and one Golden Globe for "Hill Street Blues" in 1983 and '84.

Brazil also directed episodes of "Grey's Anatomy," "JAG," "Nip/Tuck" and "CSI: Miami," among others. He was a co-executive producer of "Gideon's Crossing" and "L.A. Doctors" as well.

He continued to work on "The Shield" while fighting ALS, using a motorized wheelchair to get around.

Brazil is survived by his wife, Marie, two children, a brother and his parents.

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Dr. Sterling Edgar Walton, 57, Texas

Sterling Edgar Walton: Old-fashioned doctor who spent time with patients
02:42 PM CDT on Tuesday, April 12, 2005
By JOE SIMNACHER / The Dallas Morning News

Dr. Sterling Edgar Walton was known for the time he spent with his patients. After he took a leave of absence from his North Dallas general practice in December to battle Lyme disease, many of them wrote wanting to know when he would return.

Dr. Walton, 57, died Friday of complications of Lyme disease at his Dallas home.

A memorial will be at 1 p.m. today at Park Cities Presbyterian Church, 4124 Oak Lawn Ave. He was buried in Capital Memorial Gardens in Austin.

"He was your old-fashioned doctor who spent time with patients," said his wife, Becky Walton of Dallas. "He was your family doctor." Dr. Walton had a passion for medicine and never intended to retire, his wife said. "People view him as a very humble, understated person, but he was a perfectionist," Mrs. Walton said.

Born in San Antonio, Dr. Walton was named for his uncle, Dr. Edgar Dunstan, an internist who was named superintendent of Parkland Hospital in 1937. Dr. Dunstan was a mentor and role model for his nephew. Dr. Walton grew up in an Army family, traveling the globe when his father was transferred. He graduated from Radford High School in Honolulu, where he was valedictorian.

He received his bachelor's degree from Rice University, where he was in the marching band. He received his medical degree from what is now the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas in May 1973. He was an intern at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Walton's career included all aspects of family practice. He even delivered babies early in his career, his wife said.

He began his professional career practicing at Baylor University Medical Center before moving to Medical City Dallas about 15 years ago, his wife said. Dr. Walton was past president of the Dallas Academy of Family Practice.

"He also had a lifelong love of music," his wife said. "He was an accomplished pianist and had sung with choirs all over Dallas." Dr. Walton was an active member of Park Cities Presbyterian Church, where he sang in the choir. He was devoted to his church, gave generously and welcomed missionaries into his home, his wife said.

In addition to his wife, Dr. Walton is survived by a daughter, Elizabeth Campbell of Nashville, Tenn.; a sister, Linda Walton of Dallas; a brother, Norman Walton of Dallas; and two grandchildren.

Memorials may be made to the Park Cities Presbyterian Church Choir.

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Susan H. Parrish, 47, Florida

PARRISH, Susan H., 47, of Wesley Chapel, passed into the father's loving arms March 30, 2006. She is survived by her beloved husband of 26 years, Wayne; sons, Blake and Chase; daughter, Skye; parents, Tom and Marilyn Hoadley; sisters, Kathy and Amy Hoadley, and Betsy Santucci; beloved parents-in-law, David and Mary Parrish; brothers- and sisters-in-law, Scott and Susana Parrish, John and Cheryl Parrish, and Doug and Diane DeForest; and granddaughter, Chloee.

Susan attended the University of Florida, where she was a member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority. She was a pioneer of the home schooling movement, published numerous articles and spoke publicly on the subject for 18 years.

After discovering that her family was infected with Lyme disease, she created national awareness for the disease and helped many obtain diagnosis and treatment. Susan was also a Christian music manager for many years, which brought her great joy.

She fought a very long and hard battle with cancer, but loved to speak to groups and encourage them in their faith. People who knew her well called her "The Great Encourager." She was thankful for every day of her life.

A memorial service will take place at 10 a.m. Monday, April 3, at Idlewild Baptist Church, 18371 N. Dale Mabry Highway, Lutz, followed by a private burial. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to the Susan Parrish Memorial Fund, c/o Idlewild Baptist Church, Life Discovery Ministry, 18371 N. Dale Mabry Highway, Lutz, FL 33548.

Published in the TBO.com on 4/1/2006. (Tampa Tribune)

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Susan Hawkes-Koons, 57, Maine

HAWKES-KOONS, Susan
Sunday, September 28, 2003

HAWKES-KOONS, Susan - Passed away September 18 in Sidney, ME after a long battle with Lyme and Lou Gehrig's Disease.

She was born on September 24, 1946 in Washington DC, one of four children of Frances Hawkes Gordon and the late Herbert Hawkes.

Susan attended Berkeley High School and UC Berkeley and graduated from Mills College with a major in music. In 1980 she graduated with her degree in Law from Golden Gate University in San Francisco. A member of the Maine and California Bar Associations she had the added thrill of being sworn in at the Supreme Court in Washington DC.

She spent the next year in the Reagan White House as a special liaison in the Intergovernmental Affairs Office. She moved to Maine in 1982, as an assistant in the Attorney General's Office and in 1983 was the Assistant DA in Farmington. In 1985, she opened private law practice in Augusta, involved in general law and specializing in governmental relations.

Susan was Chair of the Maine Arts Commission for several years, a highlight being a trip to Archangel, Russia with a group of Maine artists and musicians.

Susan is survived by her husband, Dr. John D. Koons; mother, Mrs. Frances Hawkes Gordon of Pasadena, CA; sisters, Alice Roberts of Newport, NH, and Mary Ballard of Santa Barbara, CA; brother, Sam Hawkes of Keene, NH.

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Ted Paul Richard Hoggard, 21, California

http://www.legacy.com/chicoer/LegacySubPage2.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonId=2546959

Chico Enterprise-Record - Obituaries

On August 19, 2004, Ted Paul Richard Hoggard unexpectedly passed away during the night. Born on November 5, 1982; he was 21.

Ted was the beloved son of Mitchell and Merry Hoggard and the much loved brother of Chelsee and Brandee. Ted will also be sorely missed by his grandmother, Marguerite Hoggard and grandad, John Barksdale; uncles, Major Hoggard and A.J. Hyatt, Jr.; aunt, Paulla McIntire; godmother Joquetta Redamonti; and many cousins.

He will be especially missed by his long time best friend, and love, Jessica Erickson and her family, Art, Monica and Brittany Erickson. Ted was preceded in death by his grandfathers, Ted Ray Hoggard and Clifford Paul Roberds, his grandmother, Rubye Barksdale, great grandmother, V.V. Hardage and uncle, David Roberds.

Ted had an exceptionally close relationship with his grandparents and godmother and often visited and traveled with them.

Though his life was short, it was filled with many experiences and challenges. He had traveled to Europe and throughout the United States. He especially enjoyed flying from Sacramento to Paris on the Concorde SST on its only flight made from Northern California. Another highlight was a family cruise to Alaska.

He was an active competitor in CHSRA (California High School Rodeo Association) in team roping. His efforts resulted in many awards. He went to the state CHSRA finals in 2001. He loved horseback riding, hunting and fishing and availed himself of every opportunity to be in the great outdoors.

He attended Shasta, Emma Wilson, Pleasant Valley High and graduated from Champion Christian School in Chico. He attended Butte College and completed the Emergency Medical Technician course. His varied interests included sports, especially soccer, and martial arts.

He often expressed his feelings on paper and enjoyed writing stories. He wrote a poem that was published in the newspaper.

For many years, Ted courageously battled Lyme disease. He participated in pioneering research in treatment utilizing hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This led to his employment at Chico Hyperbaric Center. He was looking forward to managing the facility upon the completion of his education.

Some of Ted's happiest times were at the family cabin in Mill Creek surrounded by family and friends. He enjoyed dirt biking and riding ATV's with his friends there. His many friends and family will miss his twinkling eyes and infectious smile. He played hard and loved life.

He was a gregarious young man who was always happiest when surrounded by family and friends. Even though his time here passed much too soon, he filled his life with adventures.

Donations to CALDA (California Lyme Disease Association); P.O. Box 707, Weaverville, CA 96093, or Champion Christian School (1184 East Avenue, Chico, CA 95926) may be made in Ted's memory.

Visitation will be held in Chico at Brusie Funeral Home at 626 Broadway, on Tuesday, August 24th, from 5 to 8 p.m. His friends are invited to a celebration of Ted's life, Wednesday morning, August 25, at 11 a.m. at Calvary Chapel at 1888 Springfield Drive in Chico. Friends will be invited to share special memories of Ted.

Published in the Chico Enterprise-Record on 8/24/2004.

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Terri Dahl Fishel-Hokit, 61, California

TERRI DAHL (FISHEL-HOKIT)

A celebration of life is being planned for Terri Dahl Fishel-Hokit who died Tuesday January 24, 2006 surround by her loved ones at Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz, CA, after suffering from Lyme Disease and Breast Cancer .

She is survived by daughter Dana, her husband, David Juenemann and their three girls Hillary, Lauren and Emilie all of Capitola; brother John, his wife Lindy and their two sons Nicholas and Michael Langston of Fort Mill, South Carolina and sister Toni Garcia of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Terri was born October 15, 1945 in Escondido, CA where she also graduated from high school. She moved to Capitola with her daughter in 1968 and lived in Soquel at the time of her death.

She worked at Cabrillo College in the early 1970's and spent many years in the Title business in Santa Cruz and Santa Clara counties.

She had a kind heart and will be remembered with a smile.

Contributions are preferred to a favorite charity or Women Care Santa Cruz. Please contact Dana at 345-7251 or Gail Goudreau at 338-2303 for details.

Published in the Santa Cruz Sentinel on 1/27/2006

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Travis Allen Wilson, 23, Washington

Travis Allen Wilson , born Dec. 29, 1982, passed away on Sunday, April 23, 2006 , at the age of 23 from complications of Lyme disease and Morgellons disease.

Travis was born in Olympia, Wash., and lived most of his life in Shelton, Wash. He lived for a time in Tenino, Wash., and for the past three years resided in Leander.

He attended Pioneer School, Tenino Middle School, Tenino High School and Shelton High School. Travis was a very gifted student, winning a school spelling bee, spending his entire eighth-grade year in an advanced placement program for highly capable students, and participating in the Running Start program at South Puget Sound Community College his junior and senior years of high school.

Travis played basketball and softball in grade school, golfed, and bowled for many years on leagues. He loved playing video games both on the computer and on video game systems. He worked at a video game store when he was 14 years old and was proud to be a beta tester for Nintendo at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Wash., for several years.

Travis attended Austin Community College and was a website designer for a time. He and a friend had just generated financial backing to start a new business, going into customers' homes and fixing their computers. Travis had developed the business plan for this endeavor. He had a special talent for fixing computers. He had been building and repairing them for over a decade. They were his passion.

Travis became a certified pharmacy technician in 2003. He used this knowledge to help himself and to advise others on both Lyme disease and Morgellons disease. He was very active in monitoring Lyme and Morgellons computer bulletin boards and eager to share information that he had learned and gained from his own experience.

He was an avid reader and writer. He wrote many poems and had four chapters written in a novella to which he was very dedicated. Unfortunately, he passed away before it could be completed.

He loved to sing and play the guitar and had hoped to play in a band one day. Nirvana and the Beatles were his favorite bands. He also liked to paint abstract pictures.

Travis was very sick for much of his life, but fought to live on, trying both traditional and alternative therapies. He valued his family and friendships immensely. They meant the world to him. He told his mother many times that he would much rather have cancer, than this horrifying, nightmarish Morgellons disease. He fought for as long as he could. He was a brave soul. He will be greatly missed.

He is survived by this mother, Lisa Wilson of the family home in Leander; father, Mark Wilson of Shelton, Wash.; sister, Trisha Wilson, of Herndon, Va.; great-grandparents, John and Mary Thompson of Rainier, Ore.; and St. Petersburg, Fla.; and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and friends.

Memorial donations may be made to the nonprofit Morgellons Research Foundation at P.O. Box 16576, Surfside Beach, SC 29587. Find more information on Mor-gellons at www.morgellons.com.

Funeral service was held April 29, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Burial followed at Miller Cemetery in Agate, outside Shelton.

Published 5/3/06
http://www.hillcountrynews.com/articles/2006/05/03/life/life04.txt

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Melanie Reber
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Baby Boy, 8-Day Old, Californian

Culture positive seronegative transplacental Lyme borreliosis infant mortality.
Lavoie PE;Lattner BP;Duray PH; Barbour AG; Johnson HC.
Arthritis Rheum 1987; Volume 30, Number 4, 3(Suppl):S50.

"Transplacental infection by Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the agent of Lyme Borreliosis (LB), has recently been documented (L.E. Markowitz, et al; P.A. Schlesinger, et al). Fetal infection confirmed by culture has been reported by A.B. MacDonald (in press) from a highly endemic region (Long Island, NY).

We report a culture positive neonatal death occurring in California, a low endemic region. The boy was born by C-section because of fetal distress. He initially appeared normal. He was readmitted at age 8 days with profound lethargy leading to unresponsiveness. Marked peripheral cyanosis, systemic hypertension, metabolic acidosis, myocardial dysfunction, & abdominal aortic thrombosis were found. Death ensued. Bb was grown from a frontal cerebral cortex inoculation. The spirochete appeared similar to the original Long Island tick isolate. Silver stain of brain & heart was confirmatory of tissue infection.

The infant was the second born to a California native. The 20 m/o sibling was well. The mother had been having migratory arthralgias and malaise since experiencing horse fly & mosquito bites while camping on the Maine coast in 1971. The family was seronegative for LB by ELISA at Yale. Cardiolipin antibodies were also not found."

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John William McGrath, 75, Florida


John W. McGrath, Fort Myers, FL passed away Jan. 22, 2000, born in Boston, March 18, 1924, raised in Sharon, MA.

John is survived by his loving wife of 52 years, Barbara F McGrath; son, John W. Jr. of Chatham, MA., daughters, Stephanie of CO., Paula Newell of VT., Tracy Lenz (Albert) of FL, and Nadine Terrio (Neal) of Chatham. He is also survived by 10 grandchildren, Danny, Michael & Andrew Lenz, Thaddeus & Garrett McGrath, Paige & Ariel Newell, & Devin, Kelsey & Sydney Terrio.

John served as a Corporal in the Marine Corps. in WWII. After graduating 4th in his class at Business College, he moved to Chathamn, and owned his own successful Tax Accounting practice for 30+ years as well as serving the town as an assistant to the selectmen and the Veterans Agent.

Retiring to the Landings, he served as past President of Windjammer Village Assoc. and handicap chairman of LMGA. As a member of Fiddlesticks CC., he was in charge of the Marshalls for the Calvin Peete and FILA Tournaments.

An avid sportsman, he played ice hockey, and won trophy's in powerboat racing and golf. His golf awards include: Eastward Ho CC, Landings Mens Golf Assoc., Fiddlesticks CC., Hawaiian Airlines Open, and one of his proudest awards, the 1980 Tony Lema Memorial Tournament. Also other golf awards too numerous to list.

A memorial service will be conducted at 5:00 PM, Jan. 27th, at Picnic Point, The Landings, Fort Myers.

Donations to Crohns & Colitis Foundation of America, 386 Park Ave. South, 17th. Floor, New York, NY 10016-8804 or Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. One Financial Plaza, 18th Floor, Hartford, CT 06103.

KISER FUNERAL HOME

481-4341
Published in The News-Press on 1/26/2000.

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Theodore F. Kotula, 65, Pennsylvania


Theodore F. Kotula, 65, of Gettysburg, died Monday, March 1, 2004, at the Gettysburg Hospital. He was the husband of Phyl lis Strini Kotula for 42 years.

Born Sept. 12, 1938 in Adrian, he was the son of Barbara Collins Kotula of Lucernemines and the late Theodore F. Kotula. He was a member of St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church, Gettysburg. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and was a Pennsylvania State Trooper from 1964 until 1992, stationed in Gettysburg, and had also served on the protective detail for Gov. Richard Thornburgh during that period.

Following his retirement, he worked at Cedar Ridge Golf Course in Littlestown for 11 years. He was a former member of the Gettysburg Elks, the Bonneauville Catholic War Veterans and the Gettysburg Moose. He was a member of the Retired State Police Association in Pennsylvania, and a member and former president of the Delone Catholic High School Athletic Association, where he was recently recognized for 25 years of service.

He was a coach for Gettysburg Midget Football, Gettysburg Little League, Gettysburg Teener League, American Legion Baseball and St. Francis Xavier CYO Basketball.

Surviving also are two sons, Timothy F. Kotula of Hanover and Raymond A. Kotula of Westminster, Md.; a daughter, Kathleen M. Kotula of Abbottstown; three grandchildren; two brothers, R. Robert Kotula of Indiana, Pa., and Richard Kotula of Lucernemines; and two sisters, Carol Ann Parker of Fairfax, Va., and Barbara E. Gravel of North Reading, Mass. He was preceded in death by a brother, James Kotula.

Funeral services will be held Friday, March 5, with a Mass of Christian burial at 11 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church, 22 W. High St., Gettysburg, with Father Bernardo Pistone celebrant. Interment will be in St. Francis Xavier Cemetery, Gettysburg. The family will receive friends at the Monahan Funeral Home, 125 Carlisle St., Gettysburg, on Thursday from 6 to 9 p.m.

Memorial contributions can be made to the Delone Catholic High School Athletic Association, 140 S. Oxford Ave., McSherrystown, Pa. 17344; or to the St. Francis Xavier Catholic School, 22 W. High St., Gettysburg, Pa. 17325.

Published in the Evening Sun from 3/3/2004 - 3/4/2004.

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Trevor Allen Wayne Ligon, 2, Kentucky

Died August 2003.

Courier-Journal 8/17/2003

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Roberta J. Sorbello-Luongo, 62, Massachusetts

Roberta J. Luongo 62, of Hamilton & formerly of Revere, March 2, 2003.

Loving daughter of Lena (Valeriani) Sorbello of N. Quincy & the late Joseph Sorbello. Also survived by husband Richard G. Luongo of Revere; son Richard A. Luongo of Rockport; two daughters, Nicole Luongo Cloutier of Dover, NH, Erica Luongo of Lawrence; two brothers, Paul Sorbello of Dover, NH, Joseph Sorbello of Laconia, NH; a sister, Donna Foley of Scituate and many nephews & nieces.

Her funeral service will be held Friday 10:00 AM in the Whittier-Porter Funeral Home, 6 High St., Ipswich, followed by a committal service & entombment at the Holy Cross Mausoleum, Malden. Family & friends are respectfully welcomed. Visiting hours are tomorrow (Thursday) 5:00 to 8:00 PM.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in her name may be made to the "Angel Fund", 649 Main St., Wakefield, MA 01880.
Published in the Boston Globe from 3/4/2003 - 3/5/2003.

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Luther Conant, 51, New Jersey


Luther Conant was a Quaker, writer and filmmaker, a man who loved irreverent humor- Mark Twain was a personal hero-, and a devoted husband and a father.

In 2001, he began writing a web-blog to describe his journey after diagnoses of ALS and Lyme disease http://www.lutheroutloud.com/index.html .

Luther Conant died of complications due to ALS and Lyme disease on June, 7 2001. He was 51.
http://www.lutheroutloud.com/today.htm


''One thing I've had to give up - the illusion that I can control what's going to happen to me. I've been forced to live in the present. And if I'm going to find any joy in the life that I have now, it can only be the joys of the moment. I can't plan for anything. I've got to enjoy what's happening now.'' - Luther Conant, written in his online blog, June 2001.

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Erin Zinna, 19, Missouri

Kansas City Star
Tuesday, May 28, 2002

Friends, family astonished how tick bite could kill young athlete
By BILL GRAHAM
The Kansas City Star

Erin Zinna

They buried Erin Zinna in her boxing trunks, a symbol of the physical strength and the free spirit befitting a national Golden Gloves champion. Yet it was Zinna's humor and smile that drew more than 600 people to the Polo High School gym on May 16 for her funeral. Amid their grief was profound disbelief. Health officials say Zinna, 19, died of ehrlichiosis, an uncommon disease carried by ticks. "It's just very hard for us to believe that here's a tick that can cause this kind of damage to a big, beautiful, spirited girl," Polo principal Robert Newhart said.

Zinna lived most of her life on a livestock farm west of Polo where ticks were part of everyday life. "I've picked ticks off my kids since they were old enough to crawl in the grass," said her mother, Lynette Zinna. Erin Zinna kept up with two older brothers on farm chores such as hauling hay and often joined them on fishing trips. In the spring she searched the woods for mushrooms with her father, Ed. "She had a sweet, feminine side," her mother said. "But she was not a sissy."

In high school Zinna excelled at all sports, including softball, basketball and track. As a junior she received the Wendy's High School Heisman Award for Missouri female athletes. By her senior year she was 6 feet 2 inches tall and weighed slightly more than 200 pounds.

"She was the epitome of health," her mother said. "She ran. She ate well. She drank gallons of water. She took no medicines. I don't know of anybody who was stronger or healthier." A year ago Zinna helped lead graduates into the Polo High gymnasium as senior class president. She was an honors student and involved in many activities.

"Erin was the kind of girl who crossed all classes of people," Newhart said. "She was caring, and Erin had that smile that attracted people. And she was not afraid of anything." The straight-A student also was a champion arm-wrestler.

"She was the kind of girl who could either go into a barroom or the White House," Newhart said. Zinna was not through with athletics after high school. In August she punched her way to the National Golden Gloves super-heavyweight championship for women in Augusta, Ga. "She was a spectacular natural athlete," said Jimmy Joe Zeikle, her trainer at the Cameron Boxing Club. "She was somebody that other people thought could do anything, and she was always happy."

Zinna tried to get into the Olympic boxing program but couldn't, so she turned pro. Her first match was to have been last Wednesday at a Kansas City casino. "She had a great shot, great potential," Zeikle said. Zinna was drawn to Johnson County Community College by a program in the child-care field and in late winter participated in the shot put for the school's track team at a national meet.

Zinna quit track this spring to take a job at St. Agnes Child Care Center in Roeland Park, her mother said. Zinna wanted a career in child development.

"When her job was done, she would sit in the classroom doing her homework, just to be with the kids," said Neona Russ, the center's director and a college classmate of Zinna's. "If there was a challenged kid, she was just a magnet for them. She went out on the playground, and the kids would come running." Zinna had made plans for the summer, already setting up a puppet show in her classroom to spice up stories.

She could have picked up the tick anywhere. Zinna lived in Shawnee this spring with a relative and stayed with friends at times in Kansas City. On weekends she often returned home to the farm near Polo. She fished, hunted for mushrooms and played with her dog. On a Friday night, May 3, Zinna complained of headaches and malaise, her mother said. On May 4 she went to her weekend dishwashing job at the National Golf Club of Kansas City in Parkville. But she went home feeling ill.

"Mom, I feel like I'm dying," she told Lynette Zinna that day in a telephone call. She had a severe headache and a fever, and her neck and back hurt. That night Zinna checked in to North Kansas City Hospital. After tests, she was diagnosed with spinal meningitis, her mother said. Her condition went up and down all week. The morning of May 9 she showered and seemed better. That afternoon she got worse and later was placed in intensive care. At some point in the week her mother mentioned to the staff that Zinna had complained about an annoying tick bite behind her knee, Lynette Zinna said.

On May 10, doctors told the family they suspected that Zinna had Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a tick-borne disease, her mother said. Antibiotic treatments began, but her organs began to fail. On May 11 doctors said there was no hope. The life-support system was removed at her parents' direction, and Zinna died. Early the next week, blood tests showed that she had a form of ehrlichiosis, said Linda McElwee, administrator for the Caldwell County Health Center. McElwee said she was received the diagnosis from officials at North Kansas City Hospital. A hospital spokeswoman said doctors and officials there would not comment on the case.

"Never in my wildest dreams would I have thought a tick could do this," Lynette Zinna said. "I still don't know what to think."

Erin Zinna was buried in her blue boxing uniform. Her favorite rock music and the song "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" from her favorite movie, "The Wizard of Oz," were played at a memorial service. "Everything she did, she did so well," Lynette Zinna said. "I had to make this as right as possible." Grief extended from day-care children to college students to staffers at the National Golf Club and throughout Polo. "She had such a future," Russ said. "She would have been at the forefront of our (child-care) frontier." Zinna died on one of medicine's frontiers.

Zinna probably had never heard about Human Granularcytic Ehrlichiosis. Her mother had not, until now.

"She never did anything ordinary," Lynette Zinna said. "It would have to be something very unusual to take her."

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John Stanzcky, Connecticut


Prize winner gardener; owned raspberry farm.
Died February 2001 of Babesiosis.

Source: Lyme Times #30

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bettyg
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Vermont_Lymie
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I am sorry to have to add to this link:

Dumke, Martin F.
205 words
19 November 2006

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Final
B99
English

2006 Journal Sentinel Inc. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All rights reserved.

Dumke, Martin F.

Of Denton. Martin Frank Dumke passed away in his sleep at his home in Denton, MD on Wednesday, November 15, 2006 from neurological complications of Lyme disease.

Martin was a strong, kind, and loving man, and is survived by his friend and life-time partner, Marc Wright. He is also survived by his mother, Ruth Dumke of Milwaukee, WI; two sisters, Mary Lynn and Kathryn; four brothers, Jim, Bob, John and Tom; seven nephews, Jason, Aaron, Ben, Matt, Alex, Darin, and Danny; and three nieces, Amanda, Amber, and Mary Catherine.

He was predeceased by his father, Kenneth Dumke. Martin was an avid bicyclist and he and Marc enjoyed many memorable days canoeing, hiking, and birding. Together they enjoyed the company of their many friends and neighbors and their many visits with family.

He was an employee of Verizon in Baltimore. "Martin, I will love you always." Services were held on Sun., Nov. 19, 2006 at Fellows, Helfenbein and Newnam Funeral Home, P.A., Easton, MD. Interment was private. A memorial service will be held at a later date.

Memorial donations may be made to the National Wildlife Federation, 11100 Wildlife Center Drive, Reston, VA 20190. www.fhnfuneralhome.com

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Melanie Reber
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My most sincere gratitude to each of you who have contributed to this post.

I added Martin last night as the 208th name.

I will try to update the earlier list here soon.

My best,
Melanie

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Melanie Reber
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Up for those who have been meaning to add information.

M

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CaliforniaLyme
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2006

Carole M. C. Alton
PEPPERELL -- Dr. Carole M. C. (Paul) Alton, a resident of Pepperell,
died Sunday, Nov. 19, after a long battle with Lyme disease.
She was the beloved wife of William J. Alton.


She graduated with a bachelor's degree in dental surgery from the
University of Glasgow, Scotland in 1965, and a doctorate of medical
dentistry from Tufts University in 1976.


Mrs. Alton was a professor at Tufts Dental School through 2005. From
1978 to 1991, she had a dental practice on Main Street in Groton.


She was a dedicated sports fan and particularly loved skating and New
England Revolution Soccer.


According to family members, Mrs. Alton was involved in Dog Agility
Competitions with her collie, Lola. She loved a wide range of music
from Billy Idol to Rachmaninov.


She had a wicked sense of humor, family members said.


Besides her husband, she is survived by two sons, Paul M. C. Alton and
Guy W. B. Alton, both of Mason, N.H.; a daughter, Pamela C. D. Alton of
Nashua; four grandchildren, Ian, Winter, Renee, Camilla; and three
step-grandchildren, Nicky, Rusty, and C.J.
Published in the Lowell Sun on 11/24/2006.


Guest Book Flowers

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Marie C. Johnson has an Obituary in the Asbury Park Press and I believe she died of Lyme but I can't get the obit- for some reason m y computer goes down whenever I click on her name (no kidding, wish I was!). Can someone get it>?
Thank you,
Sincerely,
Sarah aka
CaliforniaLyme

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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MARIE C. JOHNSON, 85, of West Chester, Pa., formerly of COLTS NECK

Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 11/30/06

MARIE C. JOHNSON, 85, of West Chester, Pa., formerly of COLTS NECK, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, Nov. 28, at the Chester County Hospital, West Chester, Pa.

Mrs. Johnson was a graduate of Summit High School. She was an executive secretary with Bell Labs, New York City, in the 1940s and 1950s. She retired to raise her family.

She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, and sister who enjoyed her family, friends, and family get togethers. She was a member of St. Patrick's Church, Kennett Square, Pa. Born and raised in Summit, she also resided in Fanwood and Colts Neck before moving to West Chester, Pa., in 1983.

She was the wife of the late Martin "Ernie" Johnson and the daughter of the late Thomas and Catherine Callari of Summit. She is survived by her son, Alan C. Johnson and his wife Paula of West Chester, Pa.; a daughter, Kathy J. Pier of Wanamassa, Ocean Township; and three grandchildren, Allyson, Brian, and Eric Pier. She is also survived by two brothers, Vito and Anthony Callari of Summit.

Family and friends may call from 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday at the Bradley-Brough Funeral Home, 535 Springfield Ave., Summit.

A funeral service will be at 9:45 a.m. Monday from the funeral home, followed by a 10:45 a.m. Funeral Mass at St. Teresa of Avila Church, Summit.

Friends and family are invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in her memory to Lyme Disease Association Inc., P.O. Box 1438, Jackson, NJ 08527, or online at www.lymediseaseassociation.org.

To send condolences to the family or for further info, visit www.bradleyfuneralhomes.com.


http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061130/OBITUARIES/611300370/1075


(thank you Sarah)

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trueblue
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Thomas "Curry" Roberts, Texas


Tech student remembered by friends, peers
Michelle Casady/Staff Writer
Issue date: 3/20/06 Section: News


A father, an artist, a son, a friend and a Red Raider - Texas Tech senior Thomas "Curry" Roberts left all of these roles on March 2.

According to a memo sent out by Interim Dean of Students Gregory Elkins, Roberts was enrolled in the College of Visual and Performing Arts and was majoring in studio art with a concentration in painting.

Roberts grew up in Plainview.

"He was a really outgoing person - very fun-loving and enjoyable. He stands out in my mind as someone who had a lot to contribute," said Lisa Kersh, a former teacher and current principal of Plainview High School.

Kersh taught Roberts in a family and consumer sciences class in 1993.

"He will be missed by everyone in Plainview," she said. "He was a vibrant life-loving young man."

Close friend and fellow artist, Katy Patton, shares similar sentiments.

"Curry was a really outgoing, sweet and friendly person," said Patton, a senior painting major from Lubbock. "He was an amazing artist and very dedicated to his work."

Patton and Roberts had been friends for 2 1/2 years. They also collaborated on projects and did a few art shows together.

"He was a Marine so that carried over into his art in an interesting way," Patton said of Roberts' style.

When asked what was the most important thing in Roberts' life, Patton said right behind his 4-year-old daughter was his love of art.

Though the memo from the university said Roberts died from "undetermined causes," Patton said his death was a suicide.

"He shot himself in the art studio of his home," she said.

Patton said she saw no signs of Roberts being suicidal.

"He was always very together. I mean, he was a Marine, you know?" she said.

Patton also mentioned Roberts had Lyme disease.

According to www.m-w.com, Lyme disease is "an acute inflammatory disease ... transmitted by ticks ... that may result in joint pain, arthritis, and cardiac and neurological disorders."

Patton said Lyme disease temporarily can cause insanity in some instances.

"About a week before he killed himself he was saying things that made me think he was temporarily nuts," she said.

Roberts' professor of painting Michael Collins said he views his death as a "devastating shock."

"I've been teaching for 28 years, and this is by far the worst thing that has ever happened to me," said Collins, assistant professor or art and area lead painter for graduate and undergraduate studies.

When asked about his abilities and personality as a student, Collins talked about Roberts' dedication.

"He was an excellent student. He did 17 paintings for me from a hospital bed fighting Lyme disease. Now, what does that say about his character?" Collins said.

He also mentioned Roberts was being looked at for several scholarships for graduate school based on his talents.

Collins also recalled last summer when Roberts' went to Italy with him to study, saying Roberts had "lots of gifts and lots of ability."

"Whatever led to this is yet to be understood by a lot of people. He was an amazing young man with incredible potential," he said.

The flags on campus are scheduled to be lowered in Roberts' honor today.

--------------------
more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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CaliforniaLyme
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Case No: 26.
Autopsy No.: #46758
Age (decades): 70
Sex: F
Decade of Autopsy: 1990
Key Number: 810547
appendectomy ;.
hysterectomy ;.
bladder repair ;.
osteoarthritis ;.
family history cerebrovascular accident cancer ;.
tick bite ;.
onset nausea ataxia right facial weakness ;.
admission local ;.
diagnosis LYME disease nervous system ;.
elevated serum cerebrospinal fluid igm igg titers borrelia burgdorferi ;.
intravenous ceftriaxone ;.
transfer progression cranial nerve deficits ;.
lyme disease ;.
secondary bell palsy cerebellar involvement ;.
right lid lag ;.
heberdeen nodules ;.
elevated serum cholesterol ;.
aspiration pneumonia ;.
pleocytosis ;.
mononuclear per lumbar puncture ;.
area increased signal ;.
weighting noted right cerebellar peduncle ;.
enhanced ;.
gadolinium ;.
white matter lesions corona radiata per magnetic resonance imaging ;.
multiple temperature spikes ;.
enterobacter species per sputum culture ;.
broad spectrum antibiotics ;.
right vocal cord paralysis per nasopharyngeal endoscopy ;.
acute respiratory arrest ;.
intubation ;.
extubation required one hour ;.
chest radiograph consistent ;.
new bilateral aspiration pneumonia ;.
admission stereotatic biopsy pontine lesion ;.
left gaze paresis anisocoria right cornea decreased sensation bell palsy uvula
deviated right ataxia upper extremities ;.
consistent ;.
right pontine lesion ;.
blot negative lymph disease ;.
negative rheumatoid factor ;.
serum rapid plasma reagin positive ;.
broad spectrum antibiotics ;.
pulmonary infiltrates per chest radiograph ;.
anemia ;.
small left pleural effusion sonography ;.
atelectasis pleural effusion negative lymphadenopathy negative definite masses
per computerized tomography ;.
extensive necrosis ;.
lymphocytes atypical poorly preserved suggestive negative diagnostic small cell
malignant neoplasm per nervous system sterotactic needle aspiration ;.
necrotic tissue cannot determine specimen represents necrotic brain abscess
tumor per pons needle biopsy ;.
steroid therapy ;.
tracheostomy ;.
mechanical ventilation ;.
hypotensive episode responsive fluid resuscitation ;. feeding tube ;.
heme positive loose stools ;.
conjunctivitis treated ;.
topical gentamicin ;.
right gaze palsy ;.
leukocytosis ;.
percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement ;.
elevated cerebrospinal fluid glucose per lumbar puncture ;.
extremely atypical ;.
background mononuclear per cerebrospinal fluid analysis ;.
left subclavian venous line ;.
hypotensive episode responsive fluid resuscitation ;.
increasing bilateral atelectasis versus infiltrates per chest radiography ;.
antibiotic therapy ;.
enterobacter per sputum culture ;.
stable ring enhancing lesions posterior pons decreasing cortical edema exam
less distortion fourth ventricle per magnetic resonance imaging study ;.
diarrhea ;.
positive assay clostridium difficile toxin ;.
weaning ventilator ;.
pulmonary toilet ;.
supraventricular tachycardia per electrocardiogram responsive verapamil ;.
recurrent atelectasis left lower lobe per chest radiograph ;.
continuous positive airway pressure maintain airway ;.
empiric flagyl ;.
right subclavian line ;.
maltophilia per sputum culture enterobacter ;.
enterococcus ;.
per urine culture ;.
cardiopulmonary arrest ;.
successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation ;.
coma score ;.
neurological exam consistent ;.
brain death ;.
heparin ;.
lidocaine pressor agents ;.
atrial tachycardia ;.
intermittent atrial flutter fibrillation per electrocardiogram ;.
increased arterial alveolar oxygen gradient ;.
burst suppression pattern consistent ;.
severe anoxic brain injury per electroencephalogram ;.
negative resuscitate status ;.
death ;.
well differentiated primary cns lymphoma ;.
associated hemorrhage necrosis right inferior cerebellar peduncle brain ;.
severe ischemic ;.
anoxic ;.
encephalopathy cerebral cortex cerebellum brain ;.
lacunar infarcts midbrain putamen brain ;.
adenoma right kidney ;.
acute chronic pancreatitis pancreas ;.
chronic passive congestion intrahepatic cholestasis steatosis liver ;.
organizing pneumonia right left lower lobes lung ;.
focal active pneumonitis lungs ;.
scattered cytomegalovirus intranuclear inclusions ;.
organized thromboemboli lung ;.
leiomyomas stomach esophagus ;.
congestion edema lungs ;.
weight gms ;.
calcified granulomas ;.
greatest diameter ;.
lower lobe left lung ;.
mild atherosclerosis left anterior descending right coronary arteries heart ;.
cardiomegaly ;.
left ventricular hypertrophy heart ;.
fatty infiltration right ventricle heart ;.
atherosclerotic plaque ;.
stenosis superior mesenteric artery ;.
moderate complicated atherosclerosis aorta ;.
mild atherosclerosis pulmonary artery ;.
degenerative joint disease vertebra ;.
hemorrhagic urethritis cystitis urinary bladder ;.
hematomas rib fractures anterior chest wall thorax ;.
cardiopulmonary resuscitation ;.
ulcer gastroesophageal junction ;.
cytomegalovirus inclusions underlying endothelium ;.
diverticulosis colon ;.
tracheostomy tube trachea ;.
heberdeen nodes nodes radial deviation distal
interphalangeal phalanges hands ;.
mild pedal edema ;.
surgical absence uterus ovaries ;.
hysterectomy

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Autopsy No.: #26488 positive LYME serology
Case No: 7. Autopsy No.: #26488 Age (decades): 40 Sex: Decade of Autopsy: 1990 Key Number: 26972 diagnosis multiple sclerosis age ;. progressive deterioration neurologic status requiring total care admission ;. intravenous adrenocorticotropic hormone ;. adjustment medications ;. phenobarbital ;. positive LYME serology ;. admission meridian nursing center hills ;. paraplegia ;. postural tremor ;. recurrent ;. coli urinary tract infection ;. aspiration thin liquids ;. increased difficulty swallowing ;. decreased oral motor control ;. five pound weight loss past six months ;. declining mental status ;. patient family decision gastrostomy tube placement secondary patient wishes against artificial life support ;. initiation comfort care only orders ;. discontinuation food fluids ;. elevated temperatures degrees ;. shallow respirations ;. apneic spells ;. decreased responsiveness ;. death hours ;. extensive multiple periventricular demyelinated plaques bilateral cerebral hemispheres cerebellum basal ganglia brainstem high levels cord ;. brain weight ;. moderate hydrocephalus vacuo ;. purulent material ;. bacterial overgrowth bronchi bilateral lungs consistent ;. aspiration ;. focal hemorrhage small foci acute bronchopneumonia apical posterior basilar bilateral lungs ;. combined weight ;. squamous metaplasia urinary bladder ;. cause death ;. multiple sclerosis ;.

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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imanurse
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James Andrew Anderson, California
1949 - 2006

James Anderson was born in Bakersfield, CA on December 7, 1949 and passed into our loving Heavenly Father's arms on November 18, 2006, in Mammoth Lakes, CA. He fought a courageous battle with Lyme disease and Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS).

James graduated from Shafter High School and served in the U.S. Coast Guard from 1968-1971. He attended Cal State Bakersfield College where he earned a degree in Business Finance in 1976. He worked for the U.S. Dept. of Labor on the Consumer Price Index in Kern County before moving to Santa Barbara, CA.

He leaves behind his wife, Barbara (Romuld), of 27 years as well as his step children, Christine Maness (Bob) and five children in Chico, CA; Rev. Michael Moccardini (Yvonne Tatzel) in Santa Barbara, CA; Rev. Kevin Moccardini (Amy Miller) and five sons in Lancaster, CA; his uncle Dave Anderson (Bebe) in Shafter, CA; sister, Susan Anderson in Bakersfield; sisters-in law, Debbie Romuld, Pam Borth, and Lynn Halliday. His father, Elmer Anderson; mother, Norma Anderson; brothers, Tim Anderson and Dr. Phillip Anderson, and grandparents preceded him in death. A graveside service was held at Goleta Cemetery in Goleta, CA on November 30th, at 10:00 a.m. Arrangements by Welch-Ryce-Haider Mortuary in Santa Barbara, CA.

James Andrew Anderson "Andy" Dec. 7, 1949 - Nov. 18, 2006

Published in the Bakersfield Californian on 12/3/2006.

--------------------
**Eat Chocolate**

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imanurse
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Bryan Grimes Jr., 67, North Carolina

AYDEN - Mr. Bryan Grimes Jr., 67, passed from his earthly life on Friday, Dec. 29, 2006, in Pitt County Memorial Hospital. The funeral service will be conducted Monday at 1 p.m. in the Immanuel Free Will Baptist Church with pastor Brad Donaldson officiating. Entombment will be in the mausoleum at Pinewood Memorial Park. Pallbearers will be William Demsie Grimes, James Robert Grimes, John Wharton Grimes, David Briley Jr., Howard Paramore, Keith Manning, Cary Whitaker and Lyndel Barnes.

Mr. Grimes, a native of Washington, N.C., was the first child of the late Bryan and Bobby Musgrave Grimes. He graduated from Washington High School in 1957 and the University of North Carolina in 1961. After college, he became a commissioned officer in the USAF and served for a period of time in Vietnam. Since 1970, he has been self employed in various businesses. In 1981, he, along with his wife and son, started Harvest Time Foods Inc., which produces Anne's Flat Dumplings. He retired as president in 1995 because of illness and his son, Bryan Grimes III became president, but he never lost interest in the business. Before his illness, he was a member of the Lion's Club and the Toastmaster's Club. He was a lifetime member of the Full Gospel Businessmen's International and a devoted member of Immanuel Free Will Baptist Church in Winterville and loved the people there.

Mr. Grimes was a gentle and kind man whose love for his family was only surpassed by the love he had for his savior and Lord Jesus Christ. He went quietly through life and will be remembered by many for his kindness and many who never knew him benefited from his generosity. The world recognizes and applauds a man whose success is measured by his worldly possessions, but we honor this man for the treasures he built up in heaven which he now possesses.

A man of strength, his courage was shown in the battle he fought for so many years against Lyme disease and the destruction it had on his body. He fought bravely, never complaining, and now he is seated in high places free from the bondage of this disease. A light has gone out here in our lives, but we know that Heaven has a bright new star.

He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Mildred Anne Briley Grimes; son, Bryan Grimes III and wife, Windy, and granddaughter, Elizabeth Anne all of Ayden; brothers, William Demsie Grimes and wife, Myrtle, of Mocksville, James Robert Grimes of Plymouth, and John Wharton Grimes and wife, Connie, of Washington; sister, Martha Lewis Grimes Harding and husband, Edmund, of Washington; brother-in-law, David C. Briley, Jr. and wife, Gwen, of Grimesland; sister-in-law, Peggy Joyce Briley Stocks and husband, Stanley, of Wendell; and a number of nieces and nephews.

The family will receive friends at Wilkerson Funeral Home today from 7-9 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to Immanuel Free Will Baptist Church, 317 Vernon White Road, P.O. Box 415, Winterville, NC 28590.

Published in The Daily Reflector on 12/31/2006.

--------------------
**Eat Chocolate**

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Melanie Reber
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Thank you IMA.
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Melanie Reber
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Dylan Gleavey, 7, Rhode Island

Warwick boy succumbs to encephalitis
02:18 PM EST on Thursday, December 28, 2006
By Cynthia Needham

Journal Staff Writer

WARWICK -- A 7-year-old boy whose parents called him their ``superhero'' was buried yesterday, five days after dying of encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain, at Hasbro Children's Hospital.

Dylan Gleavey was one of two second graders from Warwick's Greenwood Elementary School to contract a neurological virus this month. State health officials are trying to determine if the two cases are related.

As Dylan's condition worsened in mid-December, his classmate was admitted to Hasbro with viral meningitis. She has since recovered.

Digital Extra
View, sign a sympathy guestbook for Dylan Gleavey

Hearing about the illnesses, anxious Greenwood parents met with state health officials last week to find out more.

``We are as concerned as the parents, quite honestly. Right now we don't know what to tell parents except yes, there are two kids with neurological infections, but we don't have the lab [reports] to tell us if they are connected,'' the state's chief epidemiologist, Dr. Utpala Bandy, said yesterday. ``We are actively investigating the cases. I wish we had the answers, but right now we don't. This investigation is not over.''

On the other hand, Bandy and other state officials emphasize that they do not believe there is any public health threat.

``We're feeling OK because we're not seeing a third, fourth and fifth case. It's been a month [since the two were diagnosed]. If you had an outbreak, others would have gotten it already,'' Bandy said.

With just one pediatric hospital in Rhode Island, illnesses such as these are easier to track here than in other states, she said.
The state has ruled out both mosquito-borne eastern equine encephalitis and rabies as the cause of Dylan Gleavey's illness. Now they are trying to determine whether the same organism caused the illness in each child. Those tests will likely take several more weeks, Bandy said.
Two doctors from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta are here helping with the state's investigation.

At last week's meeting with Greenwood parents, Bandy said she explained that encephalitis and viral meningitis are ``uncommon complications of very common viruses.''

Each condition is a somewhat general term used to describe a swelling in the area of the brain.

Meningitis is a swelling of the tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord, while encephalitis, the more serious of the two, is an inflammation of the brain itself. Often, people who suffer from encephalitis will experience some meningitis, or swelling of surrounding tissues, though meningitis sufferers might never experience encephalitis, Bandy explained.

Telltale signs of both illnesses include sudden fever, stiff neck, confusion and sometimes seizures.

Rhode Island sees 300 to 400 cases of viral meningitis a year, compared with just one or two cases of encephalitis, according to health department statistics.

Many children -- and adults -- can be exposed to viral meningitis and not develop symptoms any more serious than a runny nose. Occasionally, people who have a problem with their immune system or a predisposition to the condition can develop more serious symptoms, Bandy said.
(Bacterial meningitis is a more serious and rarer version of the condition and is more likely to lead to death.)

The second-grade classroom at Greenwood was cleaned with bleach before the meeting with parents. Health officials say the school is safe for the children's return next week.

School Supt. Robert J. Shapiro said yesterday the School Department will continue to monitor the situation at Greenwood when classes resume.

Bethany Furtado, a School Committee member-elect who once served as president of the school's parent teacher organization, said that although some parents remained ``panicked,'' she thought health officials did a good job explaining the illnesses and dispelling rumors of a health threat.

Inside Dylan Gleavey's house on Cottage Street yesterday, brightly wrapped Christmas presents lay unopened. His parents, Charles and Denise Spoerer, say they can't bear to unwrap them.
Both parents still wear blue hospital bracelets affixed to their wrists the day their son was admitted to Hasbro, on Dec. 1.

Earlier that week, Denise Spoerer said Dylan had a cold. She took him to a walk-in clinic where her son, an asthma sufferer, was diagnosed with a serious sinus infection. When Dylan suffered a seizure the next day, Spoerer rushed him to Hasbro, and he was soon diagnosed with viral meningitis, she said.

In mid-December, following what his parents said was a long seizure, doctors diagnosed Dylan with encephalitis and moved him to the intensive care unit. He died last Thursday at 3:51 p.m.

Around the same time Dylan's condition became more serious, the Spoerers said, the second child from Dylan's classroom was admitted to Hasbro with similar symptoms. Citing privacy laws, officials will not identify the second child, but reiterate that she has recovered.
Returning from their youngest son's funeral yesterday, Dylan's parents moved from sadness to anger and back to sadness as they talked about his death. They are critical of the School Department's response and of the care Dylan received at the hospital.

``It took two weeks and another child being admitted to the hospital before anyone said anything,'' Denise Spoerer said.

``How can there be two cases in a classroom and they not be related?'' she asked.

Softening, she talked about how her little boy loved Japanese Yu-Gi-Oh! cards and playing on his scooter. In happier times, Dylan used to joke that he'd save his parents from any intruders or bad guys. They called him their superhero.

http://www.projo.com/health/content/WB_warwickfatal_12-28-06_P73JQMC.2ce1bd4.html

also:

http://www.projo.com/news/content/projo_20070101_01germs.6506f789.html

and:

http://news.bostonherald.com/national/view.bg?articleid=175080

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Getting Better
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Melanie: Keep these coming. Though sort of depressing, they also are realistic and remind us of what we are facing.

I don't see in the last post about the boy with encephalitis that he was diagnosedwith lyme. Did I miss it?

--------------------
Jeff

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Melanie Reber
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Hello Jeff,

Mycoplasma pneumoniae or walking pneumonia, is a Tickborne disease. It is highly contagious, as the articles point out, and just a few short courses of ABX will not help these poor students who have now been exposed.

``When physicians diagnose someone with walking pneumonia, they are usually referring to an infection with an organism called Mycoplasma pneumoniae. (Apart from being a pain, mycoplasmas are kind of cool. They are the smallest self-replicating biologic systems known.) Mycoplasma is a major cause of respiratory infections in school-aged children and young adults. It is most common between the ages of 5 and 15, accounting for 70% of pneumonias in children aged 9 to 15. Mycoplasma can be contagious with close contact. It usually requires prolonged contact to catch the disease. Epidemics have been reported in situations such as summer camps and boarding schools. The disease spreads through breathing air coughed by someone who is infected. Since the cough is often worse at night, people sleeping in the same room are most vulnerable.''

http://www.drgreene.org/body.cfm?xyzpdqabc=0&id=21&action=detail&ref=416


``What are the causes and risks of the condition?
Most cases of encephalitis are caused by a viral infection of the brain tissue; however, there are numerous potential causes. Selected viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, and non-infectious causes of encephalitis include: Viruses transmitted by a mosquito bite, such as:''

* Mycoplasma ( usually causes "walking" pneumonia )

http://health.discovery.com/encyclopedias/illnesses.html?article=315

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lpkayak
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melanie-thankyou for all you have done on the memorial project.

i am confused about what is going on in rhode island and pmed you-but your box is full. please let me know when you empty it-i would really like to taalk to you. thanks.lp

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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imanurse
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Mary Frampton, 76, California

JANUARY 4 * 2007 MALIBU SURFSIDE NEWS PAGE 15

Death of Longtime Local Environmentalist Is Mourned by Many

* Founder of Save Our Coast Wanted to Be a Voice for Marine Mammals and Their Ocean Home

BY BILL KOENEKER

Mary Frampton, 76, who was in the forefront of the local environmental movement especially during the 1980s and early 1990s, has died.
The longtime Malibuite, who said she could live anywhere in the world but loved Malibu and would not leave, had recently revealed she believed she had Lyme disease. The cause of death, according to a Los Angeles County Sheriff's report, was ``apparently of natural causes based on a doctor who signed the death certificate.''

``We are going to miss her,'' said Malibu Mayor Ken Kearsley, who was a neighbor and longtime colleague. The mayor served on the board of directors of Save Our Coast which was founded by Frampton.

Former Mayor and City Councilmember Joan House, now a member of the city's planning commission, who worked closely with Frampton on several key environmental issues, said, ``Mary Frampton was a tireless worker on behalf of the dolphins, water quality and the ocean. Mary's unique individuality and focus will be greatly missed by me and is a loss for the city.''

Councilmember Sharon Barovsky said she was also saddened by Frampton's sudden departure.

Frampton early on became interested in environmental issues, particularly about clean ocean water, and often stated everyone should insist the oceans remain clean and healthy and free from pollutants and discharges from land based human endeavors. She said surfers, who had started their own environmental movement calling themselves the canaries of the coast, in part, influenced her insights.

Frampton became very involved in how bacteria and viruses remain active in the oceans long after they are discharged and was influenced by some of the most prominent researchers and scientists at the time who were warning about the dangers of infection to swimmers, ocean users and even marine mammals. The latter, whom she called the innocent creatures of the underwater world, helped spur on another group of Frampton's, called Dolphin Watch.

By all accounts, Frampton's most intense passion after the city was incorporated was several attempts to create a marine sanctuary along the Malibu coastline. Frampton and SOC lead the charge for city leaders to do what was necessary to develop some kind of protection for Malibu's fragile shoreline.

The resultant product, despite initial opposition from commercial fishing interests, made it through Sacramento's legislative process only to be vetoed by the governor. ``She was way ahead of the curve when she championed the cause of no-take zones in the Pacific, which would have enhanced the number and the size of fish and the health of the ocean,'' said House.

House recalled how Frampton had paid for one of the studies required to show the need for a sanctuary. ``With studies and documents in hand she went to Sacramento and managed to achieve the support of commercial fishermen for the no-take zones and encouraged the legislators to implement these zones,'' added House. ``Unfortunately this did not occur.''

Barovsky talked about how Frampton never gave up her desire to see firsthand a sanctuary created for Malibu. Barovsky said she told Frampton just weeks ago that the current administration's plans for marine protection included an area in or around Malibu.

``Mary was so thrilled,'' Barovsky remembered. ``She said, `Oh my God, I could die happy.'''

Barovsky praised Frampton's behind the scenes help with the city. ``Most people have no idea what she did for the city. Save Our Coast was a co-signer for the Los Flores restoration project. She supported acquisition of the Chili Cook-Off site and made calls for us and opened up doors,'' added Barovsky.

The mayor recalled how she remained a tireless cheerleader for the municipality. ``She was always on the phone. She was always talking to people. She was very positive. She cared about the animals. She cared about the ocean. She cared about the beauty of Malibu,'' he noted.

A photojournalist by trade, Frampton worked for years at the Los Angeles Times and was married to a Times editor, who passed away several decades ago. It was her husband's love of the sea and sailing that brought the two to Malibu purchasing a modest ranch home in Sycamore Park.

Frampton's work is a who's who of the political dignitaries and world-famous celebrities of the 50s, 60s and 70s that she captured on film. It is believed her work is archived at UCLA. Frampton came from a newspaper family. Her father owned the Spanish-language paper El Sol of San Bernardino.

When husband and wife commuted to work, the two continued to spend all of their free time in their paradise by the sea. The two landscaped the creek side bungalow that is just minutes walking distance to the ocean and over the years, the subtropical vegetation grew into what Frampton called her ``rainforest,'' always beckoning friends and others to visit.

Her attorney John Murdock confirmed that Frampton left wishes to keep her residence as the headquarters for Save our Coast. She often expressed interest that the home become an environmental center.

Frampton's love of nature extended to trees, many of them along the riparian corridor she lived in towering over her. She contended the trees protected her, her critters and all who dwelled below them. Just this winter the fierce Santa Ana windstorms brought several of the huge sycamores that graced her property and her neighbor's down onto her house but without any untoward effect to any structure. ``The trees protected me,'' she insisted.

At one time, Frampton became so concerned that a government agency such as the California Coastal Commission might force her to rid her property of exotic species of trees that she extracted promises from several individuals that they would chain themselves to the trees to save them from any untoward action.

Frampton's foray in local public life began in the mid-1980s when she guided her group Save Our Coast into the political turbulence of the time in Malibu when Los Angeles County was attempting to sewer Malibu. She insisted that sewering of the coastal community would not be the way to keep the ocean safe from pathogens because of the technology used in the 1970s and 1980s that allowed for pipe outfalls to simply discharge the effluent further out to sea. Frampton's and others' insistence there be no pipe outfall is a legacy that remains today in terms of local or regional leaders suggesting that sort of solution for Malibu. The idea could never get past Frampton's local lobbying efforts.

With the influence of a number of groups, including Save Our Coast, and hundreds of other Malibuites, the county's efforts to put in a major sewer line and plant were thwarted and Frampton turned her efforts towards informing the public about the biological hazards that existed along the coastline.

Save Our Coast sponsored several major symposiums that featured well-known speakers who told about the probable fate of the oceans if mankind's current practices on land were left unchecked.
Memorial services are pending.

--------------------
**Eat Chocolate**

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trueblue
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"A Groton dentist is also reported to have died recently from the disease, according to Susan Horowitz, a member of the Groton Board of Health and a local veterinarian."

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=050787

Does anyone know if we have this one? And/or how to get that information?

--------------------
more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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CaliforniaLyme
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I don't know geography of back East at all but I assumed that was Dr. Carole Alton- is Pepperell near Groton- or maybe Groton was where she practiced and Pepperell where she lived>? Because she is a dentist who just died- she is on this thread-

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There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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trueblue
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Thank you, Sarah! That's the one, how did you find it?

I was trying to do searches and came up with nothing. (apparently her practice was in Groton)

--------------------
more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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CaliforniaLyme
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Oh just because she was a dentist who just died of Lyme!!! That's all*)!!!

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Vermont_Lymie
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Teresa McGilley Redlingshafer, 72, of Overland Park.

The Kansas City Star (Missouri)

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News

January 10, 2007 Wednesday

SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS

Relished-her-Irish-roots-TRIBUTE

HEADLINE: Relished her Irish roots TRIBUTE

BYLINE: Adjoa Adofo, The Kansas City Star, Mo.

Teresa McGilley Redlingshafer, 72, of Overland Park.

When and how she died: Dec. 29, of Lyme disease.

Age: 72

Partner for life: While a student at Loretto Heights College in Denver, Teresa McGilley met her future husband, Raymond Redlingshafer Sr., at her aunt's home in Kansas City. Raymond Redlingshafer said it was his wife's good looks, great personality and consideration for other people that won him over.

In all five of the businesses he started, Teresa was her husband's "right-hand man," handling all the accounting. "She was smart, and she could handle it," he said. "She was the best partner you could have had."

Family life: After their marriage in 1954, the couple had seven children within nine years.

"We would go on picnics once a month at Loose Park across the street -- even during the winter in the snow," said daughter Teresa Gehring. "With seven kids, going out to eat was expensive. Having picnics made sense."

They would gather around a fire in one of the park's stone hearths, make s'mores and listen to their mother's stories.

"She would tell lots of stories about growing up, and her dad," Gehring said. "She would tell us stories that she heard from her relatives about Ireland."

Irish all the way: She was the daughter of Irish immigrants and loved "everything Irish." In fact, 10 years ago, she acquired dual citizenship. "Her father and mother were 100 percent Irish," said son Raymond Redlingshafer Jr.

"They (Redlingshafer and her siblings) were the classic children of immigrants who came over and achieved. With my uncle Jim McGilley, she began to collect family documents from Ireland." Before her death, she visited Ireland twice.

Interest in astrology: In 1974, Teresa Redlingshafer, who had a penchant for math and an interest in the stars and planets, began to study astrology. "It's tremendously math-oriented," said Raymond Redlingshafer Jr. "Later, she learned how to use a computer just so she could do astrology."

Survivors include: Her husband, four sons and a daughter-in-law, two daughters and 22 grandchildren.

The last word: "Her favorite quote was one by Mother Teresa: 'We may do no great things, only small things with great love,'�" Gehring said.

To suggest community members to profile, send e-mail to tributes@kcstar.com.

Copyright (c) 2007, The Kansas City Star, Mo. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News. For reprints, email tmsreprints@permissionsgroup.com, call 800-374-7985 or 847-635-6550, send a fax to 847-635-6968, or write to The Permissions Group Inc., 1247 Milwaukee Ave., Suite 303, Glenview, IL 60025, USA.

LOAD-DATE: January 10, 2007

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Lymetoo
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Wow, Vermont....That was a great obit! Sounds as though she was one special woman.

--------------------
 -
oops!
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Vermont_Lymie
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hi lymetoo -- nice to see you!

Yes, that obit really captured her personality...

I am a bit ambivalent about posting obits that I see. On the one hand, I think we all should be optimistic, about our health and treatment. And so I hesitate to post lyme-related obits.

On the other hand, info is power and I believe in sharing information, as sad as these posts are.

Here's to hoping for more lyme research and better treatment methods!

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Melanie Reber
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Patricia Elaine (Jamison) Cooley passed tragically February 10, 2007 in Victoria. Disease prevented her pursuit of many interests including art. She was an active member in the Lyme and Crohn's disease communities. A memorial service will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2007.
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imanurse
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Duane H. Johnson, 65, Wisconsin

Duane H. Johnson, 65, Junction City, died Thursday, Jan. 25, 2007, while under the care of St. Joseph's Hospital Hospice at the House of Dove in Marshfield. He fought a three-year battle with Lyme disease and cancer.

Memorial services will be held at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Shuda-Plover Family Funeral Home in Plover, with Gary Fenn, an elder from the Stevens Point congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, officiating.

Visitation will be at the funeral home from 5 p.m. Wednesday until the services.

Condolences may be offered online at www.ploverfuneralhome.com.

Mr. Johnson was born Aug. 1, 1941, in Waupaca, a son of the late Howard and Opal (Minton) Johnson. He attended schools in Scandinavia.

He was married to Marlene Laszewski on May 18, 1968, in Stevens Point.

He retired from Sentry Insurance.

Survivors include his wife; one son, Shawn, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; his stepmother, Vivian Johnson, Waupaca; one brother, Stanley (Audrey), Waupaca; and nieces and nephews.

He was also preceded in death by one infant brother, Neal.


Source: The Portage County Gazette

--------------------
**Eat Chocolate**

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imanurse
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James P. Koch, 79



By Bryan Marquard, Globe Staff | February 18, 2007


A poster hanging in a lab where James P. Koch conducted research carried an admonition that took hold in his creative mind as he glanced at it each day.

"He told the story very often himself," said his wife, Harriet. "Somebody had put the poster up on the door of their lab. It said, 'No matter what your problem, you won't be able to solve it until you solve the population problem.' He saw it and it felt so true to him that he never forgot it."

Turning from the study of biological chemistry to gynecology, he devoted the rest of his career to helping control population growth and inventing better approaches to women's reproductive health care.

Dr. Koch, whose work produced a cervical cap for contraception, died Tuesday in his Brookline home. He was 79 and his health had failed after a severe case of Lyme disease and a series of small strokes.

A member for many years of the medical advisory committee for the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts, Dr. Koch had been on the front lines of the reproductive rights debate, sometimes facing protests and threats.

"He was one of the pioneer doctors willing to perform abortions at a time when it was not readily available, even when it was legal," said his daughter Pamela, of Menlo Park, Calif. "There was a lot of courage and commitment involved in making that right for women really possible. You had to be courageous and willing to have people picket you."

James Paine Koch was born in St. Paul. He graduated from St. Paul Academy, received a bachelor of arts from Harvard College in 1951, and a medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1956.

For most of the next 16 years, Dr. Koch was a researcher in biological chemistry at hospitals in Boston and at Harvard Medical School.

In the early 1970s, he switched his focus to gynecology and a few years later began developing a cervical cap.

He patented the birth control device and in the process became perhaps the first physician in New England to prescribe that form of contraception.

A few years ago, Dr. Koch and his wife joined daughters and granddaughters in Washington, D.C., for a reproductive rights march.

"I think it was a pretty powerful experience for him to be there," said his daughter, who introduced him to other doctors participating in the event.

"They kind of looked at him and said, 'Wow' -- not realizing that it was such an old fight, and yet still a fight," she said.

While Dr. Koch's greatest impact was in the contraception field, his imagination roamed wide.

"In his early years, he patented a lamp and he patented bookends," his wife said. "He was always tinkering."

She met Dr. Koch when he was an undergraduate at Harvard. Away from work -- and often away from their brood -- the couple went snorkeling and scuba diving throughout the Caribbean before settling on the island of Bonaire, off Venezuela, as their destination of choice.

"We went to the Bahamas, we went to Belize, we went to Mexico -- we went to five or six different places," his wife said. "And then we finally got to Bonaire and it was just so wonderful. The snorkeling and diving was just so accessible. You didn't have to go on a boat with 30 other people, you can go right off shore. We went down there for almost 25 years."

A devotee of music, Dr. Koch kept radios in nearly every room he frequented and was on a first-name basis with the DJs at WHRB, the undergraduate radio station at Harvard.

And he kept a harmonica for idle moments.

"On a plane, in a restaurant, he'd pull out a harmonica," his daughter said.

From folk to classical, bluegrass, blues, and gospel, Dr. Koch's musical passions knew few bounds.

"Zydeco? No problem," his daughter said. "Go to a folk festival out in Western Massachusetts? He's there."

Dr. Koch's expansive tastes carried over into fields beyond medicine, too, which meant "he was never bored," his wife said. "He always had a clear sense of purpose. He was always interested in so many things, even things he didn't have time for. He always said, 'I wish I had another life -- I wish I was a biologist. . . . I wish I had another life -- I'd like to be an astronomer.' "

In addition to his wife and daughter, Dr. Koch leaves four other daughters, Amelia of Newton, Sandra Koch McFarren of Carson City, Nev., Johanna of Incline Village, Nev., and Lousia of Silver Spring, Md.; a sister, Mary Adams Danos of Arlington, Va.; a brother, Frederick, of Brattleboro; and nine grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. today in First Parish Unitarian Church of Brookline.

Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.

--------------------
**Eat Chocolate**

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imanurse
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http://www.westportnow.com/index.php?/v2/comments/16084/

Saturday, February 03, 2007

Famed Artist and Musician Eric von Schmidt Dies at 75

Eric von Schmidt, a renowned Westport artist and pioneering figure in the folk music explosion of the late 1950s and early 1960s whose works touched the lives of generations of musicians, died Friday at a Fairfield convalescent home. He was 75.

Eric von Schmidt (c) posed with Westport artist Howard Munce (l) and Mollie Donovan of the Westport Historical Society in September 2004 prior to the debut of an exhibit of his paintings from his ``Giants of the Blues'' series. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Contributed photo


His daughter Caitlin von Schmidt of Westport said her father had been in ill health since suffering a stroke in September. She said a memorial service will be announced later.

Eric von Schmidt, a Westport native and 1949 Staples High School graduate, was the son of the late illustrator Harold von Schmidt whose rustic portraits of the American West appeared on Saturday Evening Post covers and in other magazines.

He perhaps became best known as a folk and blues singer-songwriter of the folk/blues revival of the 1960s, a key part of the East Coast folk scene and crowd that included Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.


Von Schmidt's 1969 album ``Who Knocked the Brains Out of the Sky.'' (CLICK TO ENLARGE) File photo


Dylan wrote liner notes for von Schmidt's 1969 album ``Who Knocked the Brains Out of the Sky.''
``He could sing the bird off the wire and the rubber off the tire,'' Dylan wrote. ``He can separate the men from the boys and the note from the noise. The bridle from the saddle and the cow from the cattle. He can play the tune of the moon. The why of the sky and the commotion of the ocean.''

Von Schmidt's first album, ``The Folk Blues of Eric von Schmidt,'' was released in 1963. And one of his better known songs, ``Joshua Gone Barbados,'' has been performed by several other artists.

In 2000, von Schmidt, who was once described as having a whiskey-preacher voice, developed throat cancer and became unable to sing. A bout with Lyme disease made it difficult to play the guitar.

In recent years, he worked on a series of paintings called ``Giants of the Blues.''
Eric von Schmidt is shown with his Leadbelly guitar. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Contributed photo


Two years ago, the Westport Historical Society held its ``Giants of the Blues 1920-1950'' exhibit featuring works by von Schmidt.

Last March, the Westport Schools Permanent Art Collection Committee installed several large-scale paintings from the series in the hallway outside the Staples High School auditorium.

In a fine arts coup for the town, the committee received seven of the paintings on ``indefinite loan.''

Last March, the Westport Schools Permanent Art Collection Committee installed several large-scale paintings by Eric von Schmidt in the hallway outside the Staples High School auditorium. (CLICK TO ENLARGE) Emily Hamilton Laux for WestportNow.com


An obituary in today's New York Times described von Schmidt as ``a frisky, bearded figure who combined a successful career as a painter of big pictures of historical subjects with an exuberant musical style he liked to apply to American folk classics.''

It said Ramblin' Jack Elliott, the legendary cowboy singer, lauded his spirited approach to the songs of Leadbelly, the legendary blues artist, and the folk songs of Woody Guthrie.

``Eric's got that wild spirit, and he doesn't water the music down for polite society,'' Elliott told The Boston Globe in 1996, the Times said.

As a small child, von Schmidt watched his father performing miracles week after week in his studio across the driveway from the family's main house on Evergreen Avenue.

(IMAGE) Eric von Schmidt seen in his 1949 Staples High School yearbook. Underneath he wrote: ``Oh what a rogue am I.'' Contributed photo

The young von Schmidt painted beside him, sketched with him and often posed for him.

Von Schmidt's foundation in music came from his mother, Forest Gilmore.

He had bought his first guitar after hearing Leadbelly sing live on a New York radio station in 1948 when he was 17.

Von Schmidt once said of his first time hearing Leadbelly: ``This incredible voice ... was honey-smooth but had the bite of a buzzsaw cutting through a cement block. It was Leadbelly 'live' and it changed my life.''

As a teenager, he was encouraged by his parents to visit the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., where he discovered a body of forgotten archival blues recordings. There his second career was born.

Following his graduation from Staples, where he wrote under his senior picture ``Oh what a rogue am I,'' von Schmidt went briefly to the Art Students League in New York City before being drafted during the Korean War.

After Korea, he received a Fulbright Scholarship to study painting in Italy in 1956-1957.

Upon his return, he moved to Cambridge, Mass., and became a folk and blues singer in the Cambridge coffee house scene and entered the Boston literary field.


His books, ``Baby, Let Me Follow You Down,'' co-authored with Jim Rooney, won the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award in 1979, and ``Notes for American Folk Music'' won a Grammy in 1998.
In 2000, he was honored with the ASCAP Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award.

In addition to Caitlin, von Schmidt, who was twice married and divorced, is survived by another daughter, Megan Richardson of Greenfield, Mass., and three grandsons.

``He'll be missed by a lot of people, and he had a very full and vital life with no regrets,'' Richardson told The Associated Press.

Caitlin von Schmidt added, ``He did what a lot of people can't do, which is pretty much live his life by his own rules. That made it hard on the people involved with him ... but he was a very loving and generous man.''

Posted 02/03 at 10:16 AM

2007 by WestportNow.com. All rights reserved.

--------------------
**Eat Chocolate**

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trueblue
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Bill Chinnock, 59, Maine

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=017123


Author Topic: Bill Chinnock (founder of E street band)
gopats
Frequent Contributor
Member # 5218

posted 03-08-2007 07:43 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm so sorry to say that a friend has succombed to Lyme Disease. Bill helped me out when I was at my worst and pointed me to many resources to help with my lyme disease.

But unfortunately he took his own life. He was only 59. He and his wife both had lyme. He was feeling better a couple of years ago and released a new cd and was ready to release another. This is so shocking.

This is all they have on the news.

http://www.wmtw.com/entertainment/11202631/detail.html


[Frown]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


CaliforniaLyme
Frequent Contributor
Member # 7136

posted 03-09-2007 11:11 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am so sorry.
***************
In Newsday-


NATION

Bill Chinnock, 59, a founder of E Street Band

The Associated Press

March 9, 2007

YARMOUTH, Maine - Musician Bill Chinnock, a founding member of what became Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, died Wednesday at his home, police said. He was 59.

Chinnock, a blues and roots rock stylist, had been suffering from Lyme disease and police said they were called to his East Main Street home by his live-in caregiver. Lt. Dean Perry would not comment on the cause of death but said "it is not of a suspicious nature." Chinnock's manager, Paul Pappas, told WCSH-TV, Portland, that the guitarist, keyboardist and singer-songwriter committed suicide.

A native of Newark, N.J., Chinnock was a key figure in the Asbury Park music scene that propelled Springsteen to stardom.

Chinnock moved to Maine in the 1970s. He made 13 albums and in 1987 won an Emmy for his song, "Somewhere in the Night." A duet he recorded later with Roberta Flack became a theme song for the soap opera "Guiding Light." His albums include "Blues," "Badlands," "Alive at the Loft," "Dime Store Heroes," "Livin' in the Promised Land" and "Out on the Borderline." In addition to performing around the country, Chinnock wrote music for films and television.

He had been living in Yarmouth for at least eight or nine years, Perry said.
Copyright 2007 Newsday Inc.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


gopats
Frequent Contributor
Member # 5218

posted 03-09-2007 07:28 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I also find sad that all the local papers and his sister say that this is a result of a long struggle with Lyme and yet Newday leaves that part out?

Here is a link from the local paper:
http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/news/state/070309chinnock.html

Maine rock 'n' roll icon Bill Chinnock dies at 59

E-mail this page

Reader Comments (below)
By DAVID HENCH, Staff Writer

Friday, March 9, 2007



Bill Chinnock, a lifelong rock 'n' roller who was an icon of the Maine music scene, died Wednesday at his home in Yarmouth at age 59.
Chinnock's high-energy rock and passionate blues spanned five decades. He cut his teeth as a performer on the Jersey shore with the likes of Bruce Springsteen and Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, played the club scene in New York City and created country albums in Nashville. But he remained devoted to his adopted state of Maine.
"Truthfully, he was one of the best singers I've ever played with, just a great voice," said John Kumnick, a Kennebunk bass player who joined Chinnock's band in New York City in 1982 and played with him on and off since then. "He knew how to connect with people."
Chinnock started playing clubs in Maine in the early 1970s and moved here full time in 1974. His shows drew throngs of dedicated fans and won respect from critics for their energy, showcasing his musical and songwriting talents.
One reviewer said Chinnock was "all energy. When he wails the blues, he does it with the conviction of a lifelong indigent."
In recent years Chinnock struggled with Lyme disease, a chronic condition that ultimately attacked his immune system and left him in severe pain. He took his own life Wednesday, friends said.
Chinnock was a self-taught innovator who, besides mastering the guitar and the harmonica, also made films and dabbled in computer graphics. He had his own studio and also worked as a producer.
His sister, Caroline Payne of Yarmouth, recalled an older brother who used to playfully give her noogies and who took care of their parents as they aged.
"He was such an incredibly talented person, and a great brother, a beautiful brother," she said. "He was a funny, wonderful, entertaining guy."
She remembers growing up in the Jersey shore music scene when Springsteen used to be the opening act for her brother's band. It was a heady time. The band practiced in the basement while her mother cooked up plates of food for the musicians.
Eventually, Chinnock left his band and his place was taken by Springsteen. The band went on to superstardom as Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band.
Payne said her brother was never envious of the band's record-breaking success.
"I never saw him have any of that," she said. "I never saw any frustration in him, any jealousy like that. He thought Bruce Springsteen was phenomenal."
What was unfortunate, she said, was that her brother's music would sometimes be described as a Springsteen imitation, even though he was genuine and original.
"He was a tough taskmaster," said Steve Fazio, a sax player who was with Chinnock when he signed briefly with Atlantic Records in 1980. "He had this perfectionist streak in him, which is probably why didn't make it nationally real big. He stuck to his soul. He didn't sell out and get glitzy like the record companies wanted."
But he had the pipes, Fazio recalled.
"He was filling in for Michael McDonald with the Doobie Brothers when Michael couldn't make it," Fazio said.
Chinnock was not confined to a given musical style, playing blues, boogie, rock and country.
"I thought his best was blues, but he was very versatile," his sister said.
Chinnock married into one of the seminal country music families in Maine when he married Dick Curless' daughter, Terry.
The couple have been estranged for months, but Chinnock was close to the elder Curless and they often played together.
"He was a real inspiration to my brother," Caroline Payne said.
Chinnock, who also had a home and studio in Fairfield, came down with Lyme disease eight years ago, she said.
"It just took a bad course for him, branched into other areas and it really took him," she said. "I think he suffered a lot of pain. It affected his nerves."
Despite the pain, he continued playing throughout his struggle with the disease. "He fought a courageous battle," his sister said.
Their mother, who had lived with Chinnock and with whom he was very close, died about 10 days ago.
Kumnick said he talked to Chinnock last week. Chinnock complained of pain, and he wasn't one to complain.
"Physically, I always thought he was very strong, and he had a tremendous amount of energy. Lyme changed that. It became a very pervasive thing in his life the last six or seven years," Kumnick said.
The nature of his friend's death is puzzling, he said.
"It really seemed the opposite of the Bill that I know," he said. "I don't know if 'indomitable' is the word, but he was always up, always energetic, always doing something."
Chinnock's wife also suffered from a milder form of the condition years ago, but she recovered.
Chinnock made 13 albums and in 1987 won an Emmy for his song, "Somewhere in the Night." A duet he later recorded with Roberta Flack became a theme song for the soap opera "Guiding Light."
His albums include "Blues," "Badlands," "Alive at the Loft," "Dime Store Heroes," "Livin' in the Promised Land" and "Out on the Borderline."
In addition to performing at venues in Maine and around the country, Chinnock wrote music for films and television.
Chinnock is survived by his 9-year-old son William in Bangor and his 32-year-old son John, who lives in New Jersey and plays rhythm guitar.
Staff Writer David Hench can be contacted at 791-6327 or at:
dhench@pressherald.com

[ 10. March 2007, 12:50 AM: Message edited by: trueblue ]

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more light, more love
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Melanie Reber
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Michael Coers, 62, Kentucky

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Michael Coers, known for striking photos in C-J and Times, dies

Busing shot helped staff win Pulitzer
By Paula Burba
pburba@courier-journal.com
The Courier-Journal


Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Michael Coers, whose shot of a black student and white student shaking hands on the first day of court-ordered busing in 1975 became a touchstone image of that turbulent school year, was found dead of natural causes Sunday at his Louisville home. He was 62.

The photo, taken at what had been all-white Greenwood Elementary School, was among those that earned The Courier-Journal and Louisville Times photo department the Pulitzer Prize the following year. It is the only Pulitzer given to the newspapers for photography alone.

"That really was one of the iconic images" of busing in Louisville, C. Thomas Hardin, former Courier-Journal director of photography, said yesterday of the photo inside the classroom, empty except for the two boys.

Among Coers' many honors was the National Press Photographers Association's Humanitarian Award. He received it in 1985 for performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation "at the request of the EMT team to revive a 77-year-old woman who collapsed during a heat wave" as Coers was on assignment, riding with an emergency medical crew, according to a description accompanying the award.

"He was never one to blow his own horn, that's for sure," former newspaper photographer R.D. Firkins said yesterday, "He was pretty quiet about the awards that he got."

Hardin praised Coers' skills, recalling working alongside Coers as he shot for the old Sunday Magazine and for the daily paper in December 1970, when both covered the explosion that killed 38 miners in two Finley Coal Co. mines near Hyden, Ky.

During his 23 years on the staff, Coers' assignments would include four mine disasters, the 1974 tornadoes and the 1981 sewer explosion.
"He was on the scene of lots of disasters, fires and killings. He liked excitement," former Courier-Journal columnist John Filiatreau said yesterday. "He loved meeting people like coroners, police detectives and hit men. ... He had a real fascination with criminal behavior, loved to talk to the bad guys."

"He could talk his way into and out of a lot of things," Firkins said, recalling one assignment Coers had talked his editors into.

"I believe it was the Blue Angels," he said, that Coers had arranged to ride with, taking pictures as a passenger inside one of the fighter jets as the group did formations.

"He was gung-ho about everything," Firkins said.
It was Coers' enthusiastic work for the features department that earned him his "Cecil B. Coers" nickname -- an allusion to his fondness for getting the implausible shot, not unlike film director Cecil B. DeMille's vision, according to former features editor Greg Johnson.

"As a photographer, Coers was an editor's dream," said Johnson, now new-product development editor for The Courier-Journal. "No matter what sort of hare-brained idea you'd have for a cover, Coers could actually pull it off."
Johnson cited a cover shot for The Louisville Times' SCENE magazine of a "kite's-eye view" looking down a string to the ground; he got it by renting a helicopter.

"Once for a story about handguns, I told him it'd be cool if we could have a cover photo of a bullet leaving the barrel and heading directly toward the reader," Johnson said. Coers "figured out a way to get the shot using mirrors. He blasted more than 15 mirrors to smithereens, but he got the photo. As always."

Hardin, too, called Coers' "a whiz" at solving cover problems for SCENE. "Week after week, he would come up with the solutions. ... He would work tirelessly."

"Coers' innovative cover photography was a hallmark of that magazine, and it helped create a buzz about SCENE that made Saturday the most popular day of the week for The Louisville Times," Johnson said.

Coers' career was cut short by Lyme disease. After several years of struggling with complications from the disease, he left the paper in 1989.

"His vision, his strength ... everything you need to be a photographer was attacked," Filiatreau said.

The condition was undiagnosed for years because Lyme disease was not identified until 1975 and most cases had been in states closer to Lyme, Conn., where it was discovered.

Coers's ailment was not diagnosed until 1988, after about four years of symptoms that included facial palsy, chronic fatigue and severe joint pain and inflammation.

He was found dead in his home Sunday of natural causes, said his former wife, June Clausen Coers, who had been there to visit and called 911 when she couldn't get any response from him.

Coers was a native of Indianapolis and graduated from Holmes High School in Covington, Ky., in 1962. He was hired as a staff photographer for the Louisville newspapers soon after graduating from Eastern Kentucky University, where he earned his bachelor's degree in social science.

Coers also invented a darkroom-printing aide called the Enlarger Mate, which was used for "burning" -- darkening -- photos, and marketed it to the CIA and others, Firkins, said, until he sold the rights.

Obituary information, B4

http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2007703200446

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Tincup
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Bless her heart... another Lyme mother lost in Maryland. She will not be forgotten.

Her family continues to help others with Lyme disease... as they have been doing for years.


``````````````````````````````````````````````

Carroll County Timed 3/10/07


Shirley E. Wolfenden, 75, of Westminster

Shirley E. Wolfenden, 75, of Westminster died Thursday, March 8, 2007 from cancer and lyme disease at Dove House Hospice.

Born Aug. 28, 1931, in Baltimore, she was the daughter of the late Walter and Olive L. Peregoy Leach. She was the wife of John Thomas Wolfenden, who died June 29, 2000.

She was a graduate of Barton High School in Baltimore. She was a member of the Zion United Methodist Church. She taught Sunday school since the age of 16. She was a volunteer for multiple sclerosis bowling groups, Cub Scouts and youth groups. She was the Senior Citizen Volunteer of the Year in 2003. She was a book judge for elections since the 1950s. She was a member of the Lyme Support Group and the Carroll County Cancer Support Group. She also enjoyed cooking and crafts.

Surviving are son Jay Thomas Wolfenden of Westminster; and daughter Robin Ann Wolfenden of Westminster.

A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Pritts Funeral Home & Chapel, 412 Washington Road, Westminster, with the Rev. Richard Shamer officiating. Interment will be in Zion United Methodist Church Cemetery.

The family will receive friends from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday at the funeral home.

Memorial contributions may be made to Zion United Methodist Church, 2714-16 Old Washington Road, Westminster, MD 21157; or Carroll Hospice Dove House, 292 Stoner Ave., Westminster, MD 21157

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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heiwalove
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please add maggie mccorkle.. it seems she passed in 2005.
*

October 15, 2005

Maggie McCorkle

Maggie McCorkle, a pillar of the Cherry Grove community, passed away in New York City on October 15. She had had a massive stroke and had long suffered the effects of rheumatoid arthritis as a result of having had Lyme disease. Audrey Hartmann, her erstwhile longtime partner, was with her when she died, according to Joan Van Ness.

Maggie was involved with the Arts Project of Cherry Grove, which was founded in 1948, from its inception and participated in many theatrical productions. Her final show, in 1998, was Sal Piro's ``You Go Girl!!'' in which her solo song was ``(She's just my) Jill,'' a tailor-made parody of ``Bill,'' from ``Showboat.'' She came to most subsequent shows to cheer the cast on and was always welcomed backstage as she offered words of encouragement.

It is safe to say that Maggie McCorkle will be sorely missed.
*

source: http://www.fireislandqnews.com/sections/memorials/memorials.html

--------------------
http://www.myspace.com/violinexplosion

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trueblue
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Suzanne Lawrence, 62, East Hampton, NY

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=053638

As posted by Stardantzer:

I just read in my local paper of a woman from my town described as having "pretty serious Lyme Disease" by her son had gone missing on Easter Sunday.

I was going to come on here and see if there were any posts or news about it but decided to do a Google search of her name first. Sadly, she's been found dead in Rhinecliff, NY.

Article follows:
No foul play in woman's death

Rhinecliff - A woman whose body was found along railroad tracks Wednesday north of the Rhinecliff train station was not a victim of foul play, the Dutchess County Sheriff's Office reported Thursday.

They identified the woman as Suzanne Lawrence, 62, of East Hampton, NY, who was reported missing on April 10.

Her body was found around 5 p.m. on April 11 on the banks of the Hudson River by fishermen.

The medical examiner's report stated the cause of death was due to medication and hypothermia. ``There is no reason to believe that there was any foul play or suspicious circumstances involved,'' said Det. Daren Cummings. ``We don't know why she was in the area, although family members said she was fond of Rhinebeck.''

Because of the proximity to the railroad tracks, authorities asked CSX Rail to show down train traffic during the onsite investigation. That took about 2 1/2 hours, police said.

Please say a prayer for this family and keep them in your thoughts.

--------------------
~Kristina~
--------------------


edited to add:
http://www.dailyfreeman.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18205199&BRD=1769&PAG=461&dept_id=74958&rfi=6

Riverside death probably a suicide, police say
By Patricia Doxsey, Freeman staff
04/13/2007


RHINECLIFF - The woman who was found dead on the Hudson River shore this week apparently committed suicide, police said on Thursday.

An autopsy concluded that Suzanne Lawrence, 62, of East Hampton, Long Island, died of a medication overdose and hypothermia, according to the Dutchess County Sheriff's Office.

Detective Jason Mark, the lead investigator in the case, said Lawrence was the subject of a missing-person report filed Tuesday in East Hampton and that local investigators found a note in Lawrence's car, near where her body was discovered, suggesting her death was imminent.

"It appears to be a goodbye kind of note," Mark said.

The note did not refer to suicide, but "there were some things in there where she was talking about her suffering," the detective said.

Police said almost immediately after Lawrence's body was found that her death did not appear to be the result of a crime.

The body, partially concealed by brush, was discovered by two fishermen about 5 p.m. Wednesday on the rocky shore of the river between the Rhinecliff train station and the Rhinebeck water-filtration plant, police said. The site is the end of Slate Dock Road.

Police did not say how long the body might have been there.

Mark said the contents of Lawrence's note and other documents found in her car indicated she had been ill for some time, though he didn't know what illness she might have had.

Mark also said there were empty prescription bottles both in the car and in Lawrence's possession and that there were pictures and other documents in the car.

Asked about Lawrence's connection to Northern Dutchess, police said she had friends in the area and enjoyed spending time outdoors.

The autopsy on Lawrence was performed Thursday at St. Francis Hospital in Poughkeepsie. Mark said authorities are awaiting the results of toxicology tests to determine the type and amount of medication in Lawrence's system when she died.

Daily Freeman 2007


Thanks Kristina.

[ 13. April 2007, 04:07 PM: Message edited by: trueblue ]

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more light, more love
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Melanie Reber
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My friends,

Last night, I added Suzanne to the Lyme Memorial site as the 240th name.

This morning, I wanted to take the opportunity to thank each of you who contribute information so we can continue to shine a light on these most devastating diseases and how they steal lives in so many ways.

My best,
Melanie

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trueblue
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Melanie,
I edited the above post to add the article Stardantzer posted today at the end. I wanted you to see the edit. (Um, I'll edit this out after, k?)

And thank you for all you are doing and have done. [kiss]

--------------------
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CaliforniaLyme
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Hoffmann, Robert J.

Robert J. Hoffmann of Batavia Funeral services for Robert J. Hoffmann, 48, will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 950 Hart Road, Batavia, where he will lie in state from 10 a.m. until the time of service. Interment will follow in West Batavia Cemetery. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Sunday, April 8, at Moss Family Funeral Home, 209 S. Batavia Ave. (Route 31 and Main St.), Batavia. Robert J. Hoffmann went home to heaven on Thursday, April 5, 2007, while surrounded by his family. Bob fought against Lyme disease and/or ALS, a/k/a Lou Gehrig's disease for over two years, most of which was on a vent. We thank God for His presence during our journey and for the rest and peace He now provides for Bob. Bob was employed as a mortgage banker with Fannie Mae in the Chicago office since 1997. He is survived by his wife of 27 years, Vicki; their three sons, Bob, Tom and Dan; his sister, Barbara (nee Hoffmann) Preloger of Sioux Falls, S.D.; and his father, William Hoffmann of Brookfield, Wis., along with many members of extended family, church family at Immanuel in Batavia, and friends from the neighborhood and his office. He was preceded in death by his brother, Bill Hoffmann (18 years ago); and his mother, Jean Hoffmann (6 years ago). Contributions would be welcomed for Immanuel Lutheran Church, 950 Hart Road, Batavia, IL 60510, and for Les Turner ALS Foundation, 5550 W. Touhy, Suite 302, Skokie, IL 60077 in Bob's memory. For information, 630-879-7900.
Published in the Chicago Suburban Daily Herald on 4/7/2007.
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There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Melanie Reber
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Stephen Allen Herring, 42, Maryland


June 29, 2005

ELKTON -- Stephen Allen Herring of Elkton died Sunday, June 26, 2005, at his home after a long battle against Lyme disease and related problems. He was 42.

Born Oct. 7, 1962 in Indianapolis, he was the son of Donald C. and Shirley Robey Herring, with whom he made his home.

Mr. Herring was a graduate of Elkton High School and Cecil Community College, where he was a member of Phi Theta Kappa, scholastic honorary fraternity.
As a 10th Degree grand master with a doctorate in martial arts, he taught in several studios in Elkton and for several years was part owner of a tae kwon doe school in Edgewood. He also traveled to Colorado Springs, Colo., to coach a prospective member of the U.S. Olympics tae kwon doe team. For the past several years, he had been disabled and unable to teach.

Earlier, he was employed for 13 years by Chesapeake Publishing Corp. in Elkton in its printing plant, last as a pressman. He also worked several years as a carpenter in residential construction. He was graduated from the Maryland Police Academy and served briefly as a corrections officer at the Cecil County Detention Center.

Dr. Herring held the degree of 10th Dan, Doctor of Philosophy of Martial Arts, from the American University Sokeship Council. In June 2000, he was inducted into the World Wide Martial Arts Hall of Fame as ``Founder of the Year'' for the Soo Shim Hosinsul Federation, a nationally sanctioned system of tae kwon doe that he originated. He was inducted into the North American Black Belt Hall of Fame in September 2000.

For several years he was active in the local juvenile justice agency, directing its ``Hooked on Fishing, Not on Drugs'' program one summer.
In 1998, he received the Secretary's Citation from the Maryland State Department of Juvenile Justice, being named ``Volunteer of the Year'' for the state.

He enjoyed fishing and playing guitar.

In addition to his parents, he is survived by two children, Pfc. Maegan L. Herring, a U.S. Army medic stationed at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., and Martin R. Herring of North East; three brothers, Martin C. Herring and wife, Fran, of East New Market; David C. Herring and wife, Karen, of Hurlock, and John F. Herring and wife, Judi, of Wilmington, Del.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, July 1 at Hicks Home for Funerals, 103 W. Stockton St., Elkton. The Rev. Karen F. Burnell will officiate. Burial will be at Gilpin Manor Memorial Park. Visitation will be held at the funeral home from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday.

Memorial contributions may be made to Lyme Disease Research in care of the Hicks Home for Funerals, 103 W. Stockton St., Elkton, MD, 21921

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Col. Bryce H. Wagner
WINCHESTER- Col. Bryce H. Wagner, 62, of Winchester, KS., died Wednesday, June 7, 2006 at St. Lukes Hospital, Kansas City, MO. after a long illness. He was born October 10, 1943 at Lenoir, NC., the son of Leonard L. & Belva Mae Blackburn Wagner. Col. Wagner received his Masters Degree at Central Michigan in 1984 & was a War College graduate. He retired a military colonel after serving 26 years in the United States Army. He married Helen Doris Olsan on June 10, 1961 at Red Oak, IA. She survives at the home. Other survivors include four Sons, Sgt. Maj. Bryan Wagner, Alexandria, VA., William Wagner, Shawnee, KS., Bryce Wagner, Jr., Turny, MO., Kevin Wagner, Bushton, KS., Daughter, Kristina Wagner, of the home, one Brother, Denver B. Wagner, Clearwarter, FL., & 6 Grandchildren. He was Preceded in death by one brother and one sister. Services will be at 1:00 P.M. Friday, June 16, 2006 at the Winchester United Methodist Church, Winchester, KS.. Grave side service with full military honors will be at 2:30 P.M. at the Leavenworth VA National Cemetery, Leavenworth, KS. Visitation will be 6:30 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Thursday evening at the Barnett-Chapel Oaks Funeral Home, Oskaloosa, KS. Memorial contributions may be made to the Lyme Disease Association of Greater Kansas City and sent in care of the funeral home PO Box 416 Oskaloosa, KS 66066. Col. Bryce H. Wagner
Published in the Topeka Capital-Journal on 6/13/2006.


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There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Karen Johnson ``Rose'' Rose, 59, Texas


http://www.legacy.com/dfw/Obituaries.asp?Page=Notice&PersonID=87614557

Fort Worth Star Telegram (TX)

Karen Johnson "Rose" Rose
1947 - 2007

Karen Johnson "Rose" Rose, 59, a loving wife, mother, sister and grandmother, passed away Wednesday, April 18, 2007.

Graveside service: 11 a.m. Monday in Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery. Visitation: 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.

Memorials: In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Lyme Disease Association, P.O. Box 332, Tolland, Conn. 06084-0332.

Survivors: Husband, James Martin; son, Marc Heileman; daughters, Shelli Sanderson and Amy Rose; two grandchildren; and sister, Janice Simon.

Published in the Star-Telegram on 4/29/2007.

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Guestbook:
http://www.legacy.com/dfw/GB/GuestbookView.aspx?PersonId=87614557
or
http://tinyurl.com/2omc5b


***

(Wed, July 3, 2002)

Dear Lyme Friends,

I'd like to take this opportunity to introduce myself. My name is Karen J. Rose...but my friends all call me ``Rose.'' So, when you see the name ``Rose,'' that would be me!
I was recently asked to become a co-moderator of lymeinfo@yahoogroups.com (founded in December 2001) to free up the time and energies of Cheryl, Ellen, and Eva for more pressing needs. I am quite honored to be entrusted with this responsibility, and hope I can live up to their expectations. My skills as a former technical writer and researcher are a bit rusty, but I will do my best to continue keeping members informed of important Lyme issues. The focus of this information-only list will vary, according to the ever-evolving needs of the Lyme community.

For those of you who don't already know me, let me offer a little background explanation. I had never heard of Lyme disease until my ``official'' diagnosis, and subsequent disability, in April 1995. However, my confusing, complex, and well-documented medical history strongly indicates that my Lyme infection occurred in 1958. My husband, James Martin was diagnosed a year later, and is also disabled from chronic, late-stage Lyme. His medical history also points to early-childhood infection.

Since our dual-diagnoses, James and I have dedicated the majority of our time and energy to Lyme research, education, and advocacy, and have been involved with a number of online Lyme support groups. We've also met a lot of wonderful people along the way...too many people whose lives have been devastated by Lyme.

But, in March 2002, a ``mission'' of some sort starting forming in my mind. I didn't have a clear focus, and had not yet analyzed the best course of action, but I felt a very strong inner calling to do ``more.'' I discussed my ideas with a number of people whose opinions I trust and value, and considered the following possibilities:

1) Starting a physical support group locally.

2) Creating an online group targeted specifically to Texas Lyme issues, because there is a huge lack of available information here.

3) Writing a weekly or monthly newsletter.

4) Developing a Lyme website (separate from our personal websites).

So, when I was asked to co-moderate an existing Lyme-information group, I realized that this was an excellent opportunity to make a significant contribution. So, here I am, at your service.

I hope you will join me on this exciting new journey. I'll need some help, some constructive criticism, and a lot of Lymie feedback to continue providing relevant information. Please feel free to email me at toil_for_lyme@... with your ideas.

I'm looking forward to this challenging endeavor, and for the opportunity to play a part in increasing Lyme awareness.

Love ya,
Rose

New co-moderator of lymeinfo@yahoogroups.com

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CaliforniaLyme
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Drusilla Davis Howey

HOWEY Drusilla Davis Howey, age 68, director, choreographer and dancer, died at her home in Fairfield, on Sunday, January 5, 2003, of neurodegenerative complications arising from Lyme disease. She is survived by her daughter, actress/singer, Katharine, and son-in-law, R.J. Weed, of Los Angeles; two sisters, author, Marianne Mackay of Fairfield, and fine artist Jessie Stuart Mackay of Pinehurst, N.C. Burial is private and the family requests that in lieu of flowers, donations be made in Drusilla's name to the Lyme Disease Foundation, 1 Financial Plaza, Hartford, CT 06102. A memorial service will be announced at a future date. The Spear Funeral Home, 39 South Benson Road, Fairfield, is in charge of arrangements.
Published in the Connecticut Post on 1/9/2003.
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Cheek
CHEEK STEVE A. CHEEK, age 52, passed away Dec. 12, 2004. Beloved husband of Mary Ellen (nee Beck), devoted son of Bonnie (nee Patterson), loving brother of Margaret (Ray) Barda, Dottie (Bill) Blueter and James (Vivian). Preceded in death by his father Steve. Services Thursday, 11:00 a.m. WAITE & SON FUNERAL HOME, 765 N. COURT ST., MEDINA. VISITATION WEDNES-DAY 6-9:00 P.M. at the funeral home. Contributions may be made to Lyme Disease Assoc., Inc., P.O. Box 1438, Jackson, NJ 08527
Published in The Plain Dealer on 12/14/2004.
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Robert Chilton
CHILTON - Mr. Robert (Bob) passed away May 4th, 2006 in Zephyr Hills, Florida. He is survived by his wife, Kay; daughter, Patricia (Dennis) Stringham from Portage, Michigan; son, Guy Chilton from Grand Rapids; his grandchildren, Dale, Julie and Jeff Chilton, Jennifer and Matthew Stringham and great- grandchild, Devin Hunter Chilton. As requested, cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at Holy Spirit Church, 2230 Lake Michigan Drive NW, on May 15th at 11 am. You may meet with the family an hour before the service. Memorial contributions may be made to the Michigan Chapter of Lyme Disease or the charity of your choice. Arsulowicz Brothers Mortuaries, Inc. www.arsulowiczbrothers.com

Published in the Grand Rapids Press from 5/13/2006 - 5/14/2006.
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Barbara Lynn Fitzmaurice
Fitzmaurice, Barbara Lynn, Freeland, Michigan. Passed away unexpectedly Wednesday, May 3, 2006, at her home. Age 56 years. The daughter of the late Howard and Alice (Neymeiyer) Thomas was born December 31, 1949 in Saginaw, Michigan. She married Ronald Fitzmaurice, November 22, 1968. He survives her. She was a Registered Nurse. Surviving are two sons and their wives, Gary and Wendy Fitzmaurice, Saginaw, Mich.; Greg and Kim Fitzmaurice, Birch Run, Mich.; four grandchildren, Calleigh, Brittani, Brenna, and Nicholas; one sister, Nancy Thomas; three nieces. She was predeceased by a brother, Gary Thomas. The funeral service will take place at 11:00 a.m. Monday, May 8, 2006, at the W. L. Case and Co. Funeral Chapel, 201 N. Miller Rd. Rev. Edward A. Meyer will officiate with cremation to follow. Friends may call at the Chapel from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Sunday. Those planning an expression of sympathy may wish to consider the Lymes Disease Foundation or the American Cancer Society. www.casefuneralhome.com
Published in the Saginaw News on MLive.com on 5/5/2006.
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Obituaries

Jacqueline Hacker
Jacqueline (Lewis) Hacker, 55, passed peacefully at her home in Sinking Spring, on March 15, 2007, surrounded by her children and mother.
Jackie was a beloved and devoted mother and will be deeply missed by her three children: Michele, William and Valerie; and her son-in-law, Jonathan. Her loss also will be felt by her loving partner, Bob; and his daughter, Kayla. Jackie is survived by an adoring family and an extensive community of friends.

Raised in Ocean City, N.J., Jackie lived a life marked at times by difficulty, but defined by a rebellious optimism and faith that will be both remembered and missed by her family and friends.

For nearly five years, Jackie gracefully and courageously fought to overcome ALS and Lyme disease. Despite her physical weakness and lack of speech, she faced each day with many smiles and hugs giving hope and strength to those around her. Jackie's openness, warmth and compassion earned her the love and support of family and friends who remained by her side during her illness. They celebrate her life, as well as the end of her suffering, as they mourn her loss.

Memorial services will be held on Saturday at 2 p.m. in Bean Funeral Home, 3825 Penn Ave., Sinking Spring, with the Rev. Richard H. Whitney officiating. Friends will be received from 1 to 2 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that expressions of sympathy be made in Jackie's name to the ALS Association, www.alsa.org, 27001 Agoura Road, Suite 150, Calabasas Hills, CA 91301.

Bean Funeral Home & Crematory is in charge of arrangements.


Published in the Reading Eagle on 3/18/2007.

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Shirley L. Moore
NEW EGYPT -- Shirley L. Moore, 67, died Saturday at the Compassionate Care Hospice in Trenton.

Born in Elizabeth, she was a long time resident of New Egypt. She was a member of the Church of the Nazarene in New Egypt and she was a co-founder of the Lyme Disease Association of New Jersey.

Surviving are her husband: Frank Moore, a son and daughter-in-law, Gary and Kathy Moore of Freehold, a daughter and son-in-law, Deborah and Anthony Sansone, Jr. of Okeano, OH, a brother, Robert Carlson of Brick and five grandchildren, Anthony, Frank & Samantha Sansone and Kylie and Kendall Moore and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held on Tuesday at 8 p.m. at the Church of the Nazarene, 201 Cookstown Road in New Egypt, Pastor Tim Flick, officiating. Internment will be at Jacobstown Baptist Cemetery in Jacobstown.

Calling hours will be 6-8 pm. Tuesday evening at the church.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Lyme Disease Association of New Jersey, P.O. Box 1438, Jackson, NJ 08527 or the to the Church of the Nazarene.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Tilghman Funeral Home, 52 Main Street in New Egypt.

Published in The Times, Trenton, on 6/29/2003.
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Sarah Elizabeth Pawson
PAWSON, Sarah Elizabeth A 3rd generation Santa Rosan, died peacefully in her sleep, Saturday, March 15, 2003 near her childhood home in Santa Rosa. She was 41. She's the beloved daughter of Lucille Pawson and the late Richard F. Pawson of Santa Rosa. She leaves 3 brothers, Rich Pawson of Lake Tahoe, Rob Pawson and his wife Robin of Rohnert Park, John Pawson and his wife Mary Grace and their children Melissa and Ethan of Bodega Bay. Her aunts are Dawn Bean of Santa Ana, Joan Nelson of Forestville, Lynn Hale of Sonoma. Her uncles are Walt Frugoli of Lake Tahoe and Max Hale of Sonoma. She leaves several nieces, nephews, cousins. Despite a constant struggle with several major health problems, she maintained her playful and spirited self. She was an avid gardener and pet lover. She leaves behind her beautiful cat of 17 years, "White Trash" plus 4 Amazon parrots. Her family and friends will greatly miss her and her sense of humor and whimsy. Funeral services are private. Donations in Sarah's memory may be made to the Lyme Disease Foundation, One Financial Plaza, Hartford, CT 06103 or Sonoma Co. Humane Society, Box 1296, Santa Rosa, CA 95402. Arrangements thru NEPTUNE SOCIETY OF SANTA ROSA, CA.
Published in the Press Democrat on 3/21/2003.
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Trying to update the pages as always, on to page 5 now, and unable to pay for these from the pay Obit archives(we are not $) but hoping someone else has them!!! They are in my possible Lyme related death file- Anyone have the following??? Thank you for any help-
Lyme Disease Memorial Pages
http://www.angelfire.com/planet/lymedisease/Lyme/Memorial.html
Best wishes,
Sarah

Bitterman, Diane White - Diane White Bitterman-- was a life long resident of Mobile.
Published in the Mobile Register from 5/14/2006 - 5/15/2006.

Greaves, Lawrence H. - Greaves, Lawrence H. (54) Lawrence H. Greaves, a prominent Los Angeles entertainment attorney, has died at the age of 54. He died a sudden death .... More 100%
Published in the Los Angeles Times on 1/25/2006.

Hirst, John A. - Hirst, John A., Albee Twp., Michigan. Passed away late Monday evening September 29, 2003 at Saint Mary's hospital, Saginaw, age 65 after a long illness. .... More 100%
Published in the Saginaw News on MLive.com on 10/1/2003.


Jennette, Annie Lawrie Gard - Annie Lawrie Gard Jennette, 67, of 3412 Sir Colleton Court, died Saturday, November 6, 2004 at her home. Mrs. Jennette was born in Elizabeth .... More 100%
Published in The News & Observer on 11/9/2004.


Mansuy, Emmy Lou - MANSUY- Emmy Lou, May 20, 2006. Born November 27, 1920 in Scranton, the daughter of Josephine Van Bergen, nee' Lees, and Henry. She was the .... More 100%
Published in the Cape Cod Times on 6/26/2006.

McBride, Hazel M. - Hazel M. McBride, 98, of Resthave Nursing Home, Morrison, died Monday, Jan. 5, 2004, at the nursing home. Services will be 10 a.m. Tuesday, .... More 100%
Published in the Quad-City Times on 1/9/2004.


Mellor, Dr. Norman Hoyt - MELLOR, DR. NORMAN HOYT Age 88, of Corona 58 years, passed away Friday, September 17, 2004. Dr. Mellor was born February 8, 1916 in .... More 100%
Guest Book
Published in the Press-Enterprise on 9/22/2004.


Metzger, Elaine E. - Metzger Elaine E. Metzger, age 61, of Edina, on 1/23/05. Preceded in death by father, Joseph A. Joyal; daughter, Mary. Survived by mother, Rose; .... More 100%

Published in the Star Tribune from 1/24/2005 - 1/30/2005.

Mossner, Wilma C. - Mossner, Wilma C., Sand Point (Caseville), Michigan Wilma C. Mossner, age 83, of Sand Point, died Monday afternoon, December 8, 2003 at The Lutheran Home .... More 100%
Published in the Bay City Times from 12/9/2003 - 12/10/2003.


Moynahan, Margaret "Peg" - Margaret "Peg" Moynahan, 59 of Panthorne Trail, Southington, died Thursday, (December 27, 2001) at Yale-New Haven Hospital after a brief illness. Born on April 22, .... More 100%
Published in the Hartford Courant on 12/30/2001.

Predmore, Ensley H. - Ensley H. Predmore, 82, of Portland, Pa, died Monday, June 19, 2006 at Clover Rest Home, Knowlton Township, NJ. Born: On March 12, 1924 in .... More 100%
Published in The Express Times on 6/29/2006.


Roberts, Brenda Meredith - ROBERTS, BRENDA MEREDITH - died suddenly in her home on December 28, 2006. Brenda was born in Kingston, TN on October 4, 1948. She .... More 100%

Published in the Knoxville News Sentinel on 12/31/2006.

Snyder Sr., William - GREAT BARRINGTON -- William J. Snyder Sr., 66, of 54 Hollenbeck Ave. died yesterday at Fairview Hospital. Born in Great Barrington on July 26, .... More 100%
Published in The Berkshire Eagle on 3/28/2004.

Spencer, Jane Marie - Jane Marie Spencer Jane Marie Spencer (nee Churchill) age 71 of Landenberg, PA died Sunday, September 12, 2004 at her home. Born in National Park, .... More 100%
Published in the Today's Sunbeam on 9/14/2004.

Rodstein, Miriam (Pokras) - RODSTEIN MIRIAM (nee Pokras), March 14, 2007, of Delray Beach FL and Elkins Park PA. Wife of Albert; mother of Arlene (James) Ginsberg, Marc (Jill) .... More

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There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Jimmy Duarte, gifted musician, charismatic islander, dies at 70

BY MARY LANCASTER INDEPENDENT WRITER

He was a true inspiration to countless young and budding island musicians, serving both as an artistic mentor and an example of the joys of performing. A warm and generous man beloved by all who knew him, James "Jimmy" Duarte's signature nod and sincere smile will be missed by those mourning his passing. Mr. Duarte died peacefully at home on Saturday morning, May 5, 2007 at the age of 70.


ROB BENCHLEY FILE "When he talked to you he had a way of making you feel special. Jimmy had that special ability to get to your heart," said friend Nick Ferrantella of Jimmy Duarte.

"He loved this town. He was a real Nantucketer through and through," said his wife of 46 years, Jean Duarte, who explained that her husband experienced heart problems in the last few years that had developed from Lyme disease. "He loved music and he loved sports - anything with kids - the kids and music. I have never heard him say he didn't like someone. That's just the way he was. I was lucky I found someone like that."

James A. Duarte was born on Nantucket to James L. Duarte, a Cape Verdean, and Minnie (Correia) Duarte, an island native. His talent blossomed in his youth, and Mr. Duarte began playing the guitar and singing at 14. An accomplished songwriter and versatile musician who mastered styles from blues to rock and jazz, he shared his creativity freely with many teens wanting to hone their abilities and begin their own bands.


PHOTO COURTESY OF VAUGHAN MACHADO At 30 Acres are, from left, David Perry on guitar, John Gebo on drums, Shelby "Biffy" Campbell on bass, and Jimmy Duarte on guitar.

"I could talk about Jim Duarte for a long time," said Vaughan Machado. "He was my first guitar idol. When I was 11 years old and I got my first guitar for Christmas I didn't know how to tune it. My father called him and Jimmy invited me to his house late Christmas morning and helped me tune it. When I went to his house he was playing an electric guitar and it was at that moment I was inspired. I went on to play professionally and it started with that day in his kitchen. As a performer, he was a pioneer here. There is no doubt that he influenced every one of my generation on Nantucket in terms of playing and performing. He was a sweet man and definitely one of the nicest, well-liked men on Nantucket."

Nick Ferrantella was another young musician who admired Mr. Duarte's talent and was fortunate to be invited to play with him as a teenager and in his early 20s. He especially recalls an entire summer he played drums with Mr. Duarte's "Jimmy D and the Acres" group at 30 Acres off Bartlett Road, the island's original rhythm and blues and rock and roll club.

"But Jimmy had a lot of bands," said Ferrantella. "Everybody who was young and local played with one of his combinations at one time or another. Musically, he was special. He was like a song stylist with a Cape Verdean flavor that was unique to himself. He had that smooth, tasty thing going - that warm sort of thing was what made him so unique. And he always had that handsome Muhammed Ali smile. When he talked to you he had a way of making you feel special. Jimmy had that special ability to get to your heart. Like everybody, I'm going to miss him. He had a lot of fans and friends."

Ferrantella and other musicians including Bob VanArsdale, George Gardos and Mr. Duarte's cousin, David Perry, recorded Mr. Duarte's popular song "Darlin'" on a soundtrack named "Last Call" created separately from the video documentary of that name about the island's former Main Street bar The Bosun's Locker. Inside the CD envelope they thanked Mr. Duarte for allowing them to reproduce his work.

"You'd never find a sweeter guy," said Perry, who was just a small child when he first heard Mr. Duarte play. "Jimmy was actually my first guitar hero. A lot of what I first learned and my taste developed from what he was doing. He was one of the first guys I knew who was playing music when it started to become rock and roll, and that's what we wanted to be doing. He was the man for the rock and roll stuff."

Perry, like other young people, was honored to be invited to be in one of Mr. Duarte's bands when Perry was just 14, making the rounds from 30 Acres to the Chicken Box and at private parties and events, and later being part of his other groups. Some of them were the Jimmy Duarte Combo, the 30 Acres Combo, Jimmy D and the Acres and The Islanders.

"He was an influence to many and played with the musicians who were around and up and coming from the late '50s through a couple years ago," said Perry. "I don't think there is anyone around here dabbling or whatever who didn't play with Jimmy at one point."

Dennis Liadis performed with Mr. Duarte in The Islanders for five years.

"Those were probably the best five years I've ever had, music-wise. We really had a good thing going," said Liadis. "He was an unbelievable guitar player - one of the best I've ever seen. There wasn't anything he couldn't play."

Though Mr. Duarte is well-known for his music, he was also a dedicated Nantucket Boys Club football coach for many years and one of the original founders of the Nantucket Little League. In addition, Mr. Duarte was a town employee for more than three decades, first with the police department and then for about 25 years with the Department of Public Works. He began with the DPW as an equipment operator and was general foreman when he retired a half-dozen years ago.

"He was a wonderful man," said DPW administrator Diane Holdgate, who worked with Mr. Duarte for 15 years. "He was like a surrogate father to all the guys here. Everybody loved him."

Mr. Duarte was predeceased by his parents and a brother, Franklin Duarte of Dorcester. He leaves his wife, Jean, son, Nick, daughter-in-law, Jana, granddaughter, Kezia, 10, and grandson, Darian, 5, all of Nantucket. He also leaves sisters Frances Barros of Wareham and Paula Sherwood of Gloucester, brother Paul Duarte of Buzzards Bay, and many cousins.

A wake will be held at the Lewis Funeral Home on Thurs., May 10 from 5 to 8 p.m. A funeral Mass will be held at St. Mary's Church on Fri., May 11, at 11 a.m. followed by a reception at Faregrounds Restaurant.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Mr. Duarte's name may be given to the Nantucket Boys and Girls Club or to the Marla Lamb Fund through Nantucket Cottage Hospital.

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
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Gustav Robert Persson

Gustav Robert Persson
of Newark ValleyGustav R. Persson, 62, of Newark Valley, N.Y., passed away on Monday, September 19, 2006, after a long battle with ALS and lyme disease. He is survived by his wife, Reda Persson; his stepdaughters, Susan Nassar, Dallas, Texas, Laura Tramontin, Metuchen, N.J.; his grandchildren, Makena, and Carson; and his brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, and their families. He was predeceased by his parents, Robert and Mary (Valentine) Persson. Gus graduated from Newark Valley High School, and served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam Era. He was also a former member of the American Legion and VFW, Owego. Gus was an avid outdoorsman, and was a member of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Pheasants Forever, and the Wild Turkey Federation. He was a gifted whitetail deer hunter and fisherman, who would always bring home the big one.
A Funeral Service will be held at Richards Funeral Home, Rte. 17c West, Owego, N.Y., on Friday, September 22, 2006, at 2:00 p.m., with Rev. Dale Ingraham officiating. Burial will follow in West Newark Cemetery. Friends are invited to call at Richards Funeral Home on Friday, from 1:00 p.m. until the time of service. Those wishing are asked to direct memorial contributions in memory of Gus to the Muscular Dystrophy Association, 810 Seventh Ave., New York, N.Y. 10019. Attn: Director of Planned Giving to research for ALS.
Published in the Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin on 9/20/2006.
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--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Holloway, Patricia Ann

She has "fought a good fight" with rheumatoid arthritis, for 12 years brought on by Lyme disease. She recently had both knees replaced and six weeks ago had her hip replaced. She was optimistic that this last surgery would finally end her pain.

Patricia Ann Holloway, 71, crossed over to her forever home on May 17, 2007. Visitation will be held at Ott & Lee Funeral Home in Richland, MS, Saturday, May 19 from 5 to 8 pm. Funeral Services will be held at First Baptist Church of Florence, Sunday, May 20 at 2 pm with Dr. Dwight L. Smith and Rev. Gene Jordan officiating. Interment will be in the Cleary Baptist Church Cemetery. Patricia, the youngest of 12 children, was born in Sallis, MS, October 28, 1935 to Rev. A. E. Lucas and Eula Dear Lucas. She attended S. D. Lee Elementary School in Columbus, MS, and high school at Louise MS. She met Lewis Dale Holloway at Clarke Memorial Baptist College in 1952, and they were married on May 30, 1953, in Louise Baptist Church by her father who founded the Church in 1950. In 1954, Dale was called to pastor this same Church. The couple and their two sons, Lewis and Mike, moved to Kansas in August 1956 to start new churches and work in education. A generation later she realized her greatest joy with the birth of her two daughters, Kim and Jenna.
Patricia graduated from Baker University in Kansas. She received her Masters Degree from Mississippi State University and her Specialists Degree in Education from Mississippi College. She taught 4th grade and junior high math. She was Reading Supervisor of Rankin County Schools and Principal of Pearl Middle School.

She has "fought a good fight" with rheumatoid arthritis, for 12 years brought on by Lyme disease. She recently had both knees replaced and six weeks ago had her hip replaced. She was optimistic that this last surgery would finally end her pain. Pat and Dale were preparing to go home from River Oaks Hospital when God called her to her "forever home."
Pat made friends easily, she had a few friends whose "eyes lit up when they saw her coming".
She stood up for her friends loyally and held on to them tenaciously. She made friends with her doctors and "kept them in stitches" with her humor. She was very adventurous; she water skied frequently, climbed mountains in Alaska, rode the Tidal Bore in Nova Scotia, and rode a motorcycle (once).
She was blessed with gifts, skills and talents. She was organist and pianist at churches Dale Pastored. She was an art student of Marie Hull. She loved yard work more than housework. She was a better cook than our "Mommas." She loved clothes, shoes, jewelry, and shopping for the same. She is an exemplary mother and wife. She had the gift of convincing each of her six grandchildren that they were the grandest one of all.
During the first 40 years of marriage, she was a strongly independent wife striding ahead of her husband. Once again, she is now skipping in heavenly sunlight free from pain. We can only imagine her incredible joy today.
She is survived by her husband, Dr. Dale Holloway, her sons, Dr. Lewis Holloway and Mike Holloway, her daughters, Kim Holloway and Jenna Holloway Cochran, her daughters in law, Karen Holloway and Kay Holloway, her son in law, Shawn Cochran, and her six grandchildren, Tray Holloway, Luke Holloway, Josh Holloway, Ben Holloway, Kristin Holloway, and the baby boy Jackson Cochran.
Memorials may be made to the American Diabetes Association or the Indian Christian Mission, C/O First Baptist Church, Florence, MS.
Published in the Clarion Ledger on 5/19/2007.
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--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Possible Lyme related death-
*******************************
Edward Jankowski
JANKOWKSI Edward Jankowski Tool and die maker, WWII vet, 83 Edward Jankowski, 83, died peacefully on Tuesday, May 15, at his home in Mountainside, following a short illness. At his side were his beloved wife of 58 years, Isabelle, his daughter, Loretta, and his son-in-law, Michael Redmond. A Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Mountainside on Wednesday, May 23, 2007, at 10 a.m. Friends and neighbors are welcome to attend the Funeral Mass. Arrangements are by the Higgins and Bonner Echo Lake Funeral Home, 582 Springfield Ave., Westfield. Born in Bethlehem, Pa., Mr. Jankowski grew up in Elizabeth. He served in Normandy, Northern France, and the Rhineland during World War II, leaving the United States Army as a staff sergeant, Company C., 13th Infantry. He was awarded the Purple Heart for injuries sustained in combat. Mr. Jankowski was a longtime member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion, and with his wife, a longtime parishioner of Our Lady of Lourdes Church. He was a tool and die maker, retiring as a supervisor with Accurate Bushing Co. in Garwood. In addition to his wife and daughter, Mr. Jankowski is survived by his sister, Anna Jankowski of Linden. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in the name of Edward Jankowski to the Lyme Disease Foundation Inc., P.O. Box 332, Tolland, Conn. 06084.
Published in the Star-Ledger from 5/21/2007 - 5/22/2007.
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--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Possible Lyme related death->?
***************************************
Eugene W. Wallich
WAPPINGERS FALLS, NY - Eugene "Gene" W. Wallich, 65, of Wappingers Falls, passed away Tuesday, May 22, 2007 at St. Francis Hospital. He was born May 7, 1942, in Jersey City, NJ, and was the son of the late Eugene and Mary Mercurio Wallich. Gene was a veteran of the U.S. Army, serving from 1960 - 1963 and stationed in Germany with the 249th Ordinance Detail, USA REUR. He was employed by IBM in Poughkeepsie for thirty years as a Senior Advisory Programmer in the Enterprise Data Systems Division until his retirement in 1992. After his retirement, he became a consultant for IRC and Tel Tech. Gene was an avid fisherman and loved fishing with his best friend of thirty-three years, Tom Foley. He also enjoyed traveling up the Hudson River on his boat "Good Timing". He especially loved attending his grandson, Jake's, games and all of his sporting events and playing with his granddaughter, Kamryn. Another favorite pastime was playing Blackjack at Las Vegas, Aruba and Atlantic City. On September 26, 1994, in Poughkeepsie, he married Ellen L. Mooney. Gene is survived at home by his loving wife and partner of sixteen years. Gene is also survived by his step-son, Christopher Mooney of NYC; two step-daughters, Kerrianne Hammond and her husband, Jeffrey, of Hyde Park and Jennifer Mooney and her fiance, Peter Pessetto of Raleigh, NC; a daughter, Michelle Jano and her husband, Matt, of Long Island and a son, Aaron Shook and his wife, Nicole, of Wappingers Falls; a sister, Kathleen Bridges and her husband, Phil, of Mebane, NC and a brotherin-law, Peter Dreyfuss of Riverview, FL; five grandchildren, many nieces, great-nieces, great-nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by a daughter, JeanMarie Wallich. Calling hours will be held on Friday, May 25th from 2-4 & 7-9 p.m. and Saturday, May 26th from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Robert H. Auchmoody Funeral Homes, Inc., 1028 Main Street, Fishkill. Funeral services will be held on Saturday at 11 a.m. at the funeral home, followed by military honors. Cremation will be private. The family suggests in lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to the American Lyme Disease Foundation (ALDF) Mill Pond Offices, 293 Route 100, Somers, NY 10589.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Melanie Reber
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Britteny Gallgher, 17, Missouri

May 23, 2007 8:53 AM
Lyme disease is a growing problem
Posted By: Paige Heyward

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - If you are planning a picnic, a trip to the lake, or plan to send your kids to summer camp to ride horses, hunt or play golf you need to be aware of a growing problem. It's something your doctor may not even know about.

``She was just so full of life and energy,'' mother Hattie Gallgher said. Britteny Gallgher will be remembered as the girl who loved live, even though life had been hard for her.

``She had a lot of strength and courage,'' Hattie said. Britteny needed all the strength and courage she could muster as she battled a debilitating disease.

``It almost seemed with every organ. It was one after another,'' Hattie said.

Three years ago, the happy teenager developed horrible symptoms, including bowel problems, her eyes became permanently dilated. She was constantly tired, but she couldn't sleep.

``Just suffering, just pain you cannot believe,'' father Terry Gallgher said.

But doctor after doctor couldn't find the cause, not to mention a cure. ``You just want to hold her, and you say `I don't know what to do,'' Terry said.

Finally, Britteny got the right test, the test that detected Lyme disease, and even though she underwent intense treatment, it was too late. She died last February.

``I could have gotten it tons of times,'' Rebekah Rauckman said.

One of Britteny's friends, Rebekah, 16, was diagnosed early enough to recover. But, she's so tired she can't attend school full-time and has a long list of debilitating symptoms.

``I have stomach problems, headaches, nausea,'' Rebekah said.

Many doctors in the metro don't recognize Lyme disease when they see it. That's because many people think it's a disease that only strikes in the woods of the Northeast.

The few doctors that treat Lyme disease in Kansas City say it's a dangerous assumption to make.

``That's the whole problem. Unrecognized, undiagnosed,'' Dr. Joseph Brewer said.

Dr. Brewer at St. Luke's Hospital says Lyme disease can be easily cured in its early stage. It is spread by the bite of a tick. ``Clearly people pick it up here,'' Dr. Brewer said.

According to the Lyme Association of Greater Kansas City, there are at least 1,000 cases across the metro.

One tick bite can result in infection spanning three stages.

Early symptoms may include:
*A bulls eye rash at the bite
*Joint pain and fatigue

Later symptoms include:
*Memory Loss
*Personality Changes
*Organ Failure

In rare cases, like Britteny's, it can result in death. ``There's so much of this around now,'' Dr. Brewer said.

He says people can pick it up at the Lake of the Ozarks, at scout camp, riding horses, playing with dogs or hunting. You can even get it from deer that feed in your backyard.

``It's very difficult to go someplace and mention it and somebody doesn't know someone who has it,'' Dr. Brewer said.

And it's frustrating that doctors often don't even mention it to their patients. ``One of the most common calls I get from other physicians is when their child is bitten by a tick. Then they are worried about it, not worried about it until it comes to their household,'' Dr. Brewer said.

He says patients need to be their own advocates. ``They should be vigilant and not listen to `oh there's none of it around here' because that's simply not true,'' Dr. Brewer said.

``She's always in our hearts and she'll always be there,'' Terry said.

Despite Britteny's extreme suffering, she was grateful for her life and spiritual until the end.

``The lord is my strength and my song. She wrote it on her mirror in lipstick,'' Hattie said.

Her parents want to use her strength to warn others about the disease that claimed their daughter. ``We just want to save another family from going through what we went through. When you see a kid suffer for three years and lose them for no reason its mind boggling, it's frustrating, it's angering,'' Terry said.

The Gallgher's have two other children, T.J. and Lexi. They believe Britteny would have wanted them to speak out.

To learn more about Lyme disease, prevention and cures:
Lyme Association of Greater Kansas City, Inc.

http://www.nbcactionnews.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=9fd84f15-e629-4903-b052-e5d4338e43a7

[ 01. August 2007, 01:18 PM: Message edited by: Melanie Reber ]

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CaliforniaLyme
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Great, horrible post, Melanie. Lyme scares me.
That poor kid. I have begun to believe that a great, great many more people are dying of this than they want to admit- and that THAT may be part of the CDC stance- when I started doing my Lyme Memorial page years back, I got a call from the husband of one of the Lymed dead that I had spoken to months earlier. He wanted me to know he had gotten a call about someone purporting to be a reporter following up on his wifes case, her death. He knew it sounded paranoid but he believed it was someone from the government. They would not give him contact info at the end which was what made him question it all. He had no way of conatct- and that is just not what reporters do!!! Anyway, after that I heard from another Lymed family member about a weird phone call from someone and I began to worry!!! One thing I do believe they do is monitor my page and/or other pages to try and find deaths they can use against us. Treatment related deaths.
There are some on the pages. I think I became, without knowing it, before that realization, a tracking tool for THEM, the bad guys, the CDC IDSA clones trying to minimize Lyme and to maximize the bad image of us. Maybe not though- it was my fear!!! So I became even more centered on researching the deaths as much as I could because we need to keep off people who don't belong there because they will work against us.

Things I believe:

AlS is not rare
Lyme deaths are not rare (not connected to ALS). I really don't think so-
Many people die in their sleep... That scares me, too. Anoxic encephalopathy.

Agh!!! I get afraid. I do.
Anyway,
Best wishes all,
Sarah

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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www.aidc100.org/Burke_Harry.371.0.html

1918-2000



Harry Burke died on November 14, 2000 in the VA Hospital in Palo Alto, CA. He was 82. According to his family, the cause of death was complications from Lyme disease, which he had contracted more than ten years ago.



Burke was a Stanford University graduate and a World War II veteran of the submarine service. He became active in the AIDC industry in 1976, when the California company he was working for - Data Pathing Systems (DPS) - was purchased by NCR. DPS was a developer and manufacturer of factory data collection terminals and Burke was then a product manager. Soon after the acquisition, DPS incorporated bar code scanning wands into its devices and Burke received his indoctrination into the newly emerging technology.



During the next 20 years, he remained totally engrossed in bar coding and became one of its most vocal and ardent supporters. After Burke left DPS in 1986, he devoted most of his time to writing and consulting. A native Californian, he was also a prolific poet and a naturalist who loved to explore the national parks and mountains. He authored four books (Automating Management Information, Volumes I & II; Handbook of Bar Coding Systems; Barcodes Galore), and wrote dozens of articles and monographs. These writings concentrated mostly on the factory floor applications of bar coding. Although his books were widely recognized by experts for their excellent coverage of the subject, they did not sell very well.



Dick Meyers (Delta Services), who worked with Burke at NCR and remained a friend, remarked this past week: ``Harry was brilliant, but his writing style was somewhat scholarly and did not lend itself to easy reading.''



I first wrote about Burke in SCAN Newsletter in December 1980. In rereading the 23 SCAN articles that were subsequently published about him through 1994, I found that my reporting demonstrated an unabashed admiration for his unusual intelligence, acerbic wit, and total integrity. He did not abide fools nor tolerate dishonesty. Some considered him to be difficult, irascible and contentious, but he was one of the seminal thinkers of the AIDC industry. He was an honored, charter member of the AIDC 100 organization.



Burke could leave a memorable first impression. George Wright (PIPS, Inc.), who developed the add-on bar code to the UPC symbol to identify magazines and books, still remembers his only meeting with Burke -- at an early SCAN-TECH. ``He seemed to be aware of the role I played with the add-on codes,'' Wright recently recalled. ``His comments were incisive and biting and not particularly complimentary.'' What Wright may not have been aware of, at the time, was that Burke hated the proliferation of different bar code formats. He was a firm believer in the capabilities of just two or three symbologies to handle all applications.



In April 1991, Burke wrote an open letter to the Postmaster General of the U.S. Postal Service about that agency's ``multibillion dollar program...to automate mail-handling by instrumenting the reading of ZIP+4 codes.'' In typical Burkestyle he noted: ``Unfortunately, the postal program...is compromised before it is off the ground....Postnet (a clocked bar code) is demonstrably well behind state-of-the-art; it is numeric only (not able to handle international ZIPs); it is difficult to print; it cannot be read by the inexpensive instruments now used throughout industry; its read-reliability is substandard; and it does not lend itself well for use in automating the sortation of either packages or bulk mail....By choosing its own symbology, the Postal Service is driving a knife into the very heart of one of the most important challenges U.S. industry has ever faced.''



Burke's contempt for the ``establishment'' was legendary. By his own admission, he disliked confrontation at meetings and preferred memos in which he could blast away at will. In September 1985, he wrote a 24-page memo to Roger Palmer (Intermec) attacking the bar code standards that were being established by the Technical Symbology Committee of AIM/US. ``AIM is not a proper standardization forum,'' Burke warned. ``AIM members are responsible for maximizing the sale of their employers' products [resulting in]...a direct conflict of interest.'' Then, focusing his comments directly on Palmer, Burke admonished: ``I do not see how you can perform your position as chairman of the Symbology Committee. You have a legal obligation to the stockholders of Intermec. To perform this duty, your decisions must promote the sale of Intermec's products to the best you are able. As chairman of a key Symbology Committee, you have an obligation to those who are trying to use bar codes. I hold these two tasks to be in direct conflict.''



No one was exempt from Burke's criticisms. In August 1988, in response to an article I wrote about major changes anticipated for bar code scanning in the future, Burke replied: ``You merely recount symptoms rather than outline what is really going on. In actuality, bar coding is breaking out of its labeling shell to become `barcodese'...an instrument-to-instrument communication technique....[that will extend into] every nook and cranny of corporate affairs.''



During the past few weeks, in reviewing my 20-year association and friendship with Harry Burke, I have tried to assess his impact on the AIDC industry. He never invented any scanning device, or developed a successful bar code, or wrote important standards, or even participated in an industry committee. But we all knew that he was watching from the sidelines, ready to spot any inconsistencies, or to slice through the ``baloney.'' (In 1985, Harry actually wrote an essay titled ``Bar Code Baloney''; it was about a curious syndrome that came over him every time he attended a seminar on bar coding and found himself uttering the word ``baloney'' over and over as the speakers attempted to educate their unsuspecting and nave audiences.) Every industry - actually every company - should have its own Harry Burke monitoring events with a knowledgeable, irreverent, fearless eye toward preserving the integrity of its activities. The AIDC industry was fortunate to have had the original. We will miss him.



Harry Burke, who was divorced many years ago, is survived by his three children, Kevin, 53, of El Granada, CA, Trina 48, and Jeffrey, 45, of Belmont, CA; and four grandchildren.

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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trueblue
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http://www.khqa.com/news/news_story.aspx?id=37053

Ellen Cary, 7, Missouri

Girl loses life to tick-borne illness
By Rajah Maples
Posted: Thursday, May 31, 2007 at 9:14 PM

LEWISTOWN, MO -- It's a parent's worst nightmare, and it happened right here in the Tri-States.

You've heard a lot about lyme disease, and its harmful....potentially fatal effects.

But there's *another* tick-borne illness that you should be concerned about, and a local tragedy is the unfortunate proof.

7-year-old Ellen Cary of Lewistown, Missouri got sick around Mother's Day.

Many thought it was just a normal, childhood illness.......but what they didn't know ended up taking her life way too soon.

Her parents agreed to sit down with our Rajah Maples in hopes of preventing this tragedy from happening to someone you love.

When Ellen Cary started coming down with a fever, she was diagnosed with an upper respiratory infection. Her condition got worse, so doctors admitted her to the hospital and was later transferred to St. Louis Children's Hospital.

Rajah-- "You thought you were going to come home with her from St. Louis, didn't you? You never dreamed this would happen?

Eric and Harriet Cary: "No, it never crossed our minds. They diagnosed her with H-L-H and then they turned around the next day and told us that she had ehrlichiosis, which is caused by a tick bite. We had never heard of it before, but they told us the ehrlichiosis had triggered the disease called H-L-H."

A few days after Ellen was admitted to St. Louis Children's Hospital, doctors declared her "brain dead." Her parents were told there was nothing they could do, other than pack up, head home and make funeral arrangements. And it all happened in just *10* days.

Eric: "They say it's a very fast-acting disease, but they don't know too much about it."

Rajah-- "I appreciate you doing this interview, because I would hate for another parent to go through this."

Eric and Harriet: "Definitely not. I mean, what we've been through is a tragedy, and I would hate to see any child go through what Ellen went through.

Rajah---"I never got to meet Ellen, so let's talk about her life. What was she like?"

Eric and Harriet: "She was everybody's girl. Everybody loved her. She always had a hug or smile for somebody. Always thought of other people."

The Cary's want us to remember Ellen's thoughtfulness....and they also have some thoughtfulness of their own to pass along.

Harriet: "Just be careful. You never know."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention visited the Cary's home this morning to interview them about Ellen's case.

The center plans to test for ticks in every area in which Ellen had spent time.

We talked with a doctor St. Louis Children's Hospital about the illness.

It's treatable if it's caught early, but can be fatal.

Dr. Ericka Hayes says the hospital has already seen about 8 cases so far this year, including Ellen's.

Ehrlichiosis can be tricky to spot because its symptoms can be mild at first, and they can resemble a number of other illnesses.

Symptoms can include fever, headache, joint pain, fatigue and sometimes, a rash.

Dr. Hayes says it's *very* important to tell your doctor if you've pulled a tick off your body.


Thanks Bea, not sure if this was here so copied it over. So, so sad. [Frown]

[ 01. June 2007, 12:31 PM: Message edited by: trueblue ]

--------------------
more light, more love
more truth and more innovation

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Melanie Reber
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Bruno C. Malvezzi, 87, New Jersey


Bruno C. Malvezzi

87, jeweler, veteran

Tuesday, July 31, 2007

DENVILLE -- Bruno C. Malvezzi passed away at Morristown Memorial Hospital on Sunday, July 29, 2007. He had suffered and was paralyzed for the last year with Lyme disease. He was 87.

Born and raised in Weehawken, he had summered in Denville since the 1930s and moved there full-time in 1952.

He served in the Navy during World War II and received a Bronze Star and Presidential Citation for "exceptionally meritorious achievement in the performance of outstanding combat service against enemy forces." He had been a jeweler, or "platinum smith" since 1940, and worked his last 25 years at Van Cleef and Arpels Jewelers in Manhattan before retiring in 1982.

He was a member of the Elks Club in the Denville/Rockaway area, and was an avid gardener and farmer.

His wife, Mary (Pont) of 50 years predeceased him in 1995.

His sons, Frank of Emmaus of Pa., Joseph of Guilford of Conn., and Charles Malvezzi of Wallingford, Conn.; and his grandchildren, Matthew, Ben, Alex, Brett and Chloe survive him.

Funeral services will be held at Norman Dean Home for Services, 16 Righter Ave., Denville, N.J., www.normandean.com, on Friday, Aug. 3, at 11 a.m. Visitation will take place prior to the service from 9-11 a.m.

http://www.dailyrecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2007707310342

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Melanie Reber
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Dr. Edward L. McNeil, 81, Florida

Edward L. (Teddy) McNeil (formerly of Bedford, NY and Cottingham, East
Yorkshire, England) passed away peacefully July 11 at his home in Fort
Myers, Florida. Survived by his sister, Joyce (John), his four
children, Jane (Hugh), Jonathan (Chrissie), Charlie (Dave) and Andrea
(Adam) as well as his seven grandchildren, Hannah, Bryn, Joseph, Thomas,
Ian, Adam and Addison.


Dr. McNeil was a doctor of emergency medicine at Northern Westchester
Hospital, as well as a dedicated volunteer at the Bedford VFD. He was a
pioneer of aerospace and hyperbaric medicine. He was also a great
advocate in the education and diagnosis of Lyme disease.


Proud of his Scottish heritage and a great lover of Irish music, he was
never too far from his guitar, banjo, harmonica, bagpipes or penny
whistle and often seen in his kilt for dressy occasions. He is the
author of medical texts, poetry and short stories, an avid cartoonist,
painter and wood worker. Medicine was his profession and art and music
were his passions.


The twinkle of his blue eyes, his smile and laughter will be missed by all.


At Teddy's bequest his friends may commemorate the occasion by buying
some flowers and a bottle of their favorite drink and making a toast to
his memory or donate to their favorite charity as a remembrance.


Also, please see:
http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=017925

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Melanie Reber
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Dr. James Alan Yarbrough, 54, Tennessee


Wednesday, 08/01/07
Dr. James Alan Yarbrough


Dr. James Alan Yarbrough, 54 of Hendersonville passed away July 25, 2007.

Mr. Yarbrough is survived by his wife, Ladonna Bennett Yarbrough; his son, Chad Yarbrough; his daughter, Cara Yarbrough; his father, J.D. Yarbrough of Judsonia, Ark.; and his sister, Benita Yingling of Judsonia, Ark.

Funeral services were 2 p.m. Saturday, July 28, 2007, at the Hendersonville Church of Christ with Keith Parker officiating. Interment followed in the Hendersonville Memory Gardens.

James Proffitt, Donald McAdams, Chad Yarbrough, Jerry Lea, Scott Thurman, Todd Burwell and Lonnie Edwards served as active pallbearers. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Hendersonville Church of Christ Benevolence Fund.

Arrangements were made by Hendersonville Memory Gardens and Funeral Home.

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2007308010033
.............

Alan had a doctorate in psychology. His Lyme presenting as ALS. By the time he was seen by a LLMD and properly diagnosed, his illness had progressed too far for a return to health.

He fought valiantly, and while the antibiotics could not halt the onslaught of his disease, he felt they did slow it up and gave him more time with his family.

While sick he still continued to think of others, even offering his paralyzed body as a research tool for new and different treatment methods.

He will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved him.

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Melanie Reber
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Anne Brown, 70, Alabama

GUIN, Ala. - Anne Brown, 70, died June 3, 2007, at North Mississippi Medical Center-Hamilton, Ala.

Memorial services are today at 4 p.m. at Guin First United Methodist Church with Rev. Art Rowe officiating. Norwood Funeral Homes, Inc. of Guin is in charge of arrangements.

Mrs. Brown was born in Montgomery County, Ala., to the late Bird Fuller Dailey Watson and the late James Marvin Dailey II. She was a graduate of Escambia County High School in Atmore, Ala., and attended Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Ala.

She worked for Earthquake Consortium in Memphis and was a member of First United Methodist Church and was a Certified United Methodist Lay Speaker.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her stepfather, James Robert Watson; and brother, James Marvin Dailey III. She is survived by her husband, Joel Earl Brown of Guin; daughters, Anne Corinne Hale Broxson of Merryville, La., Alison Leigh Hale Nadeau of Kilauea, Hawaii, and Kelly Elaine Hale Morse of Ballwin, Mo.; sons, Curtis Hale Jr. of Round Rock, Texas, and William Michael Brown, Matthew Allen Brown and Stephen Andrew Brown, all of Meridian; sisters, Carolyn Watson Liley of Pensacola, Fla., and Laura Joe Hataway of Belleville, Ill.; 13 grandchildren and one great-grandson.

Memorials may be made to Guin First United Methodist Church Scholarship Fund.

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CaliforniaLyme
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http://www.legacy.com/timesunion-albany/Obituaries.asp?Page=SearchResults

Possible Lyme related death-
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Staucet, Grace M. "Nanny" View/Sign Guest Book


Staucet, Grace M. "Nanny" SLINGERLANDS Grace M. (Tiernan) Staucet, 79, passed away suddenly, Sunday, July 29, 2007 at her home. Born in Albany, she was the daughter of the late Justin and Loretta (Snyder) Tiernan. Mrs. Staucet was a lifelong communicant of St. Margaret Mary's Church and a graduate of Vincentian Institute. With great appreciation and flair for style, she was a jewelry and handbag buyer for Myer's Department Store during her young adult years. Her heart was captured by the love of her life, "Frankie" Staucet and, for 54 years, she devoted her life to him and their children. Grace loved to travel in their motor home and was an avid sports fan who loved to attend her grandchildren's games and watch her favorite baseball team, the New York Yankees. She loved her home, her flowers, crossword puzzles, mystery novels, going out for treats, but most of all being with her family. She was avidly involved in the parent association of St. Margaret Mary's School, Mercy High School, and Christian Brothers Academy and served as her husband's companion on special service projects to the food pantry. "Nan" Staucet was a strong woman, devoted wife, loving mother and grandmother. She will always be remembered as a special caregiver who had a gift for nurturing and caring for the young and the sick. She is survived by her loving husband of 55 years, Frank P. Staucet; and their children, Susan (David) Doemel, Frank (Monique) Staucet, Mary Serrano and Lori (Lewis) Sharp; grandchildren, Michelle (Andrew) Irons, David (Stefanie) Doemel, Danielle Doemel, Gabrielle Doemel, Michael Doemel, Wesley Staucet, Justin Staucet, Jordan Staucet, Mia Staucet, Justine Brucker-Serrano, Jonathan Brucker-Serrano, Benjamin Serrano, Caitlin Casey and great-grandchildren, Abigail, Ella and Eliza Irons. She is also survived by her sister-in-law, Mary Therese Dybel, brother-in-law, Richard H. Girvin; beloved friends, Fred and Ullie Lanifero; and her canine companion, Corky; as well as several nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her sister, Joan H. Girvin. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Thursday at 9 a.m. in St. Margaret Mary Church. Relatives and friends are invited and may call at the Daniel Keenan Funeral Home, 490 Delaware Ave., Albany, Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. Entombment, St. Agnes Cemetery, Menands. In lieu of flowers, donations in Mrs. Staucet's memory may be made to Lyme Disease Foundation, P.O. Box 332, Tolland, CT 06084-0332, or Cardiology Fund, c/o St. Peter's Hospital Foundation, 319 So. Manning Blvd. Suite 309, Albany, NY 12208.

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Robert Dawson


Robert Dawson, age 55, died Friday, July 27, 2007. Robert was born on March 26, 1952, in Bad Hersfeld, Germany, to Wilbur Clark Dawson and Hildegarde Bischof Dawson. He graduated from the University of South Carolina with a BS and MS in Physics. Robert worked as a Semi-Conductor Engineer at AMD and Spansion in research and development. He is the recipient of over 140 patents. Robert's past-times included reloading and target shooting as well as hunting. He also enjoyed working on computers. He liked to joke about his new "convertible", a bulldozer. Robert was a member of Ducks Unlimited and a Life Member of the American Rifle Association.


In the past four years, Robert faced many challenges and adversities associated with ALS and Lyme Disease.


Robert was preceded in death by his father, Wilbur Clark Dawson. Survivors include his mother, Hildegarde Dawson of Columbia, South Carolina; his wife, Annette Swint Dawson of Austin; one daughter, Amanda Karoline Dawson of Austin; one sister, Charlott Caudle of Columbia, South Carolina; and one brother, Wilbur C. Dawson, Jr. of Columbia, South Carolina, one niece, one nephew and three great-nieces. A memorial service will be held on Tuesday, July 31, 2007, at 11:00 a.m. at Weed-Corley-Fish Funeral Home, 3125 North Lamar, with Fr. Gregory Romanski officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to The ALS Association, Development Department, 27001 Agoura Road, Suite 150, Calabasas Hills, CA 91301 or on-line at www.als.org and choose the Donations tab or to St. Theresa's Choir Camp, c/o Dan Girardot, 4311 Small Drive, Austin, TX 78731. Obituary and guest book online at http://wcfish.comr
Published in the Austin American-Statesman on 7/30/2007.

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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CaliforniaLyme
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Wicker, Robert Earl View/Sign Guest Book

Robert Earl Wicker, 56, died at home Thursday, August 9, at 11:35 p.m., following a 14 year battle with Lyme Disease, recently complicated by an adverse reaction to neuroleptic drugs.
Friends and family are invited to honor his life at a memorial service beginning 6:30 p.m. Monday, August 13, held at home.


Robert is survived by his wife of 26 years, Barbara; son, Noah; father, James Willis Wicker of Loveland, CO; and mother, Lola May Perkins of Tupelo, OK. He is further survived by his sisters, Brenda Roberts of Newport, OR, Connie Martin of Ada, OK, Missy Wicker of Brighton, CO, and Christy Rader of Loveland, CO.


He is preceded in death by his sister, Ceciela Woods, formerly of Tupelo, OK.


Robert received his degree in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he graduated fourth in his class in 1972, and where he met his wife, Barbara. He was recruited by Westinghouse Electric
Corporation, where he worked for 17 years, including five years in London, England, where his territory included Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. He loved being an engineer and was named District Engineer of the Year for the corporation in the early 1980's. After Westinghouse, he worked for two additional companies before his disease put an end to the career he loved.


He was a wonderful handyman; a tolerant and generous husband; a proud father; and a steadfast and loyal brother and son.


Contributions, to honor his memory, may be made to the NC Lyme Disease Foundation, Hospice of Wake County, or the NC Coastal Federation.
Published in The News & Observer on 8/13/2007.
Notice * Guest Book * Flowers * Gift Shop * Charities

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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