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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » trying to understand the lyme diet...

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Author Topic: trying to understand the lyme diet...
Ahodge01
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Ok sorry if this is a stupid question but Im having a very hard time with the nutrition.

Should I be looking at sugars or carbohydrates when picking something out...

What constitutes a starch aka what the hell is a starch haha?

Can I eat bean like baked beans? My llmd told me three bananas and three sweet potatoes a week... why? are there any other foods I should watch for?

This is my usual day... let me know what you think...

wake up 11 am (yes I know, my hours are all screwed up)

Usually eat bowl of 100% crunchy flax with coconut milk (sugars 2g, carbs 42g) Oven made gluten free frozen waffles with some frozen berries on top (sugars 4g+ depending on how much fruit, carbs 39g) organic chicken sausage, an egg or two.

Snacks organic salami, raw revolution bar(15g sugar but all organic) yogurt... Hardboiled eggs, walnuts

Dinner is always different...

Tonight
hamburger (no bun) onion, pickle, fresh natural sweet potatoe fries, bbq beans, salad..

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TF
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You have to worry about carbs because they are made up of simple sugars. Organic sugar is sugar, so it is out.

Yeast eats sugar whether it is organic or not. No difference.

Carbs that are made from flour turn into sugar immediately. In fact, that's why a cracker "melts" in your mouth. I understand carbs are worse than sugar for a diabetic. So, all carbs are out. No waffles, no berries. (No fruit--it is sugar.) White and sweet potatoes are starchy vegetables (they are carbs), so they are out.

Yogurt and kefir are OK because the milk sugar has been eaten up by the fermenting process.

I don't know if coconut milk is OK or not. To look into that, go to the Body Ecology Diet website. My lyme doc said to follow that diet as it is an anti-yeast diet.

Bbq beans are full of sugar, so they are out. Ketchup is full of sugar. Barbeque sauce is full of sugar.

A starch is carbohydrates--potatoes, bread, pasta, cereal. I don't know what crunchy flax is. Sounds like a cereal?

I believe beans are OK, but check body ecology site to see for sure.

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kidsgotlyme
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Flax should be ok to eat.

I can't imagine that eating NO fruit would be a good idea. I would just limit it to very small amounts. Berries are a good option.

--------------------
symptoms since 1993 that I can remember. 9/2018 diagnosed with Borellia, Babesia Duncani, and Bartonella Hensalae thru DNA Connections.

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kellephant
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i agree with TF!

as far as fruit goes, i eat strawberries in my plain un-sweetened yogurt everyday. strawberries are the lowest carb fruit and a few a day definitely won't kill you. and the yogurt helps restore good bacteria into your body [Smile]

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kellephant
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oh, and i allow myself to eat one carb a day. i've never had any yeast problems, but they again i've only been on anti-biotics for 2 months... if i do start experiencing yeast issues i will cut them completely out though. i know we're supposed to completely avoid them, but i used to have an eating disorder and i cut out carbs for 11 years straight, but i am discovering that i feel a lot better physically and mentally when i eat a little more balanced.
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stork
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My symptoms have been mainly neuro/cognitive. I cut out all carbs at one point for about 3-4 months. It really slowed my progress in recovering my mental abilities.

I would consider eating only whole grains and a small amount of fruit everyday. The Atkins diet really is not healthy nor sustainable. It will keep down inflammation at first, but I am convinced it slows progress, especially if you are dealing with neuro stuff.

--------------------
long road since 2010
abx got me over the hump
diet, detox, and herbs have got me to heal

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TF
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I don't consider the anti-yeast diet a healthy diet. But, when you are on high-dose combination antibiotics, it is a necessary diet.

It is necessary to keep from getting yeast or for keeping yeast at bay.

The diet basically kept yeast at bay for me for the 1 year I had good lyme disease treatment.

As soon as I completed my treatment, I ate a complete diet that included grains and fruit. That is what I still eat today.

It has been 5 years since I completed my lyme treatment, and I am still symptom-free, enjoying my life. I have the same life I had before lyme disease--a totally normal life.

I had undiagnosed lyme disease for 10 years. I thank God every day for getting me rid of this horrendous disease.

During my lyme treatment on the combination antibiotics, if I ever cheated on the anti-yeast diet, I got yeast. That is why I say it is a diet of necessity.

The first 2 years I was on antibiotics one at a time(got poor lyme treatment), I didn't get yeast until almost the end of the 2 years. I ate a normal diet. That lyme doc never told me to eat differently. So, eventually, I had the yeast problem and, from then on, I had to eat strict anti-yeast.

So, for one year I ate this restricted diet.

Other lyme docs give their patients unlimited diflucan and other things and let them eat however they want. My now famous lyme doc did not do this. He was very strict on the diet. He made you stick to it.

When my girlfriend complained to him that she really missed fruit, he said she could eat a few strawberries at the end of a meal (never alone). So, that was his approach. It worked for me and for her.

Until you get to the point where you are getting yeast all the time, you probably don't have to be so strict. But, once you are getting yeast all the time, you have to be very strict.

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Ahodge01
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TF,

so flour from carbs are bad... but this doesnt mean carbs from all foods are bad, correct? For instance quiona has carbs and sugar but it has no flour products... Is it ok to eat...

Also, how do you know if youre getting yeast?

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TF
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Flour is a grain that has been ground up. All grains are carbs, so that is why you can't eat anything made with flour on the anti-yeast diet. Ground up grains are the same as sugar.

Quoina is a seed. It is not a grain. Therefore, quoina is OK to eat. I don't know what you mean when you say that quoina has sugar. Quoina is a tiny seed that you cook. What makes you think it has sugar in it?

You know you are getting yeast if you wake up in the morning with a white coated tongue. My lyme doc checked my tongue at the end of every visit. So, that is the primary sign. Eating and drinking can wash off the white. That's why it is best to check it first thing in the morning, or when you have not been eating or drinking for a while.

Also, yeast in the gut can cause severe gas and bloating. For some people it also causes diarhhea.

I blew up like a baloon. And, there is abdominal pain with the bloating. It is no fun.

You can see pictures of yeast on the tongue if you go on line. Sometimes it is white or yellow patches that form on the tongue. Not pretty.

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Ahodge01
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Side of quoina box says 3g by sugar...

Ive looked at the pics of yeast on the tongue and they dont really look like the same white coating mine has... mine is not thick I did the spitting in a glass thing in the morning and didnt have a lot of strings or anything just a lil bit of stuff sank to the bottom.

one dr. told me it is not candida...

Is there a way to get rid of the yeast without going on a medication..

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Lymetoo
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Candida diet and elimination:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/Forum1/HTML/021412.html

This contains a list of OK and not OK foods. It also contains suggestions for getting rid of yeast without a prescription.

(I disagree with one thing he says.. but in moderation it might be OK .. He says it's OK to eat Ezekiel bread and other low carb breads...WELL... He OWNS a health food store and SELLS that stuff... )

Follow his 5 step plan and you will succeed. It is not easy though.

One note about yogurt... many store-bought yogurts contain ADDED sugar.. Read labels carefully!!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Keebler
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-
OLE - Olive Leaf Extract - always worked for me if taken before even beginning antibiotics and all the way through. Wish I had know about it long ago.

Of course, probiotics are a must, always. Take away from antifungul Rx and antifungal herbs such as OLE.
-

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massman
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A carb is a carb is a carb.......

What matters is not where it is from (mostly) but what is the total amount that you get.

Really want low carb ? Eat more fat + protein. Saturated fat is fine, as long as there are no chemicals etc in it. Search www.mercols.com for recent info on that.

"Conquer Candida and Restore Your Immune System" by Jack Tips PhD ND is an excellent book that has helped many deal with this challenge.

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canefan17
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Keebler,

What brand OLE?

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seekhelp
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Is this part of the diet?

http://www.icecreamireland.com/images/Dessert/Deathbychoc-sm.jpg

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gwb
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Lyme diet? This works for everyone.

http://www.drrons.com/weston-price-traditional-nutrition.htm

http://www.westonaprice.org/

Gary

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Ahodge01
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Keebler,

what brand ole?

Lymetoo,

thanks! that link was exactly what I was looking for!

to everyone else,

Is brown rice ok to eat? Is rice a grain?

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Lauralyme
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Brown rice is okay

--------------------
Fall down seven times, get up eight
~Japanese proverb

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Keebler
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-
All of these are non-gluten complex whole grains (except for Wild Rice - which is really a grass). All of these are packed with nutrients.

Brown rice is good and there are many varieties of brown rice (white is best avoided). It's good to alternate.

And - there is a whole other world just beyond brown rice. I think Red is better than brown and that BLACK RICE is best of all. Some markets carry or can special order - and the web sites ship, too. Best in moderation, to accompany hearty vegetables and protein of your choice.

Drizzle with your favorite olive or nut oil, with rich spices and/or garden herbs.
-----------------

http://www.lotusfoods.com/Organic-Forbidden-Rice/p/[email protected]

(Black) Organic Forbidden Rice

For only $0.50 a serving, this rice provides the richest nutritional value, providing a higher level of vitamins, minerals and fiber of any bran rice, as well as a comprehensive range of amino acids, proteins, vegetable fats and essential trace elements needed by the body.

Cooks in about 30 minutes - dark purple/black and very rich in texture & flavor.

======================

http://www.lotusfoods.com/Bhutanese-Red-Rice/p/[email protected]

Bhutanese Red Rice

With more potassium than Gatorade, and a significant amount of magnesium, this quick-cooking whole grain is a nutritional and culinary superstar. It will entice you with its complex, nutty, earthy flavor, soft texture and beautiful russet color.

Cooks in only 20 minutes

====================

Other darker rices:

http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_nf_jubilee.aspx

Lundberg Jubilee is a colorful aromatic blend of Wehani, Black Japonica, short and medium grain red rice, short and long grain brown rice and sweet brown rice.

-----
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_nf_japonica.aspx

Lundberg Black Japonica

-----
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_nf_wehani.aspx

Lundberg Wehani

----

http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_christmas.aspx

Christmas Rice (a red rice)

----
http://www.lundberg.com/products/rice/rice_og_wild.aspx

Organic Wild Rice

==========

Red Quinoa is also a good choice in addition to regular Quinoa. It's good to rotate. Other non-gluten whole grains include amaranth, millet and raw buckwheat (actually a legume).

And, while not at all a grain, the very tiny dark French lentils are a gold mine of nutrients. There are many varieties of beans, just as with rice varieties, the darker ones usually have a richer mineral and amino acid complex.

-----------

http://www.thedailyplate.com/nutrition-calories/food/generic/french-lentils_7616

French Lentils - Nutrition Facts listed

Note: nearly 12 grams of protein per serving, half the RDA for Vitamin A and high in Iron.

-----------
http://sonic.net/~alden/Lentils.html

Lentils . . . are low in fat and high in protein and fiber . . . Before cooking, always rinse lentils and pick out stones and other debris. Unlike dried beans and peas, there's no need to soak them.

Scroll down to see all the different types.

=================

http://www.livestrong.com/thedailyplate/nutrition-calories/food/generic/lentil-dal/

Red Lentils - Nutrition Facts

These cook very fast and also are packed with nutrients. High in iron and with 11 grams of protein per serving.
-

[ 06-07-2010, 12:11 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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-
OLE - 3 brands
-------

http://www.acuatlanta.net/myroleab-tablets-p-22018.html

Myrolea-B by White Tiger -- a simple formulation of highly concentrated extracts from four Chinese herbs and one Western herb.

A history of this formula:

http://www.itmonline.org/arts/flu.htm

http://www.itmonline.org/arts/shuang.htm

===============

www.olivus.com/cautions_olive_leaf.htm

Olivus Olive Leaf Extract

================

http://www.seagateproducts.com/olive-leaf-extract.html

Seagate Olive Leaf Extract (also see the nasal spray)
-

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TF
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My now famous lyme doc said you can have a LITTLE brown rice on occasion--like once per week.

Regarding quoina, if you buy a box of quoina, and the only ingredient in the box is quoina, then that is OK.

Quoina is OK.

Look at "ingredients" rather than the "nutrional information."

Under "nutritional information" it could say that the quoina has a few grams of sugar. That is not the same as saying there is sugar in the box. Look at the brown rice bag and you will see how many grams of carbohydrates are in rice--a lot. Carbs become sugar in your body, so that's why brown rice is not a good choice.

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Keebler
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-
There seems to be a wide definition for carbs. Just as fats used to mean bad stuff, we know now that some fats are very good, and very necessary.

Remember that all vegetables and fruits are carbohydrates. All grain, too. Legumes are carbs, too. But some grains and legumes are so packed with protein that they are a fabulous food to nourish our cells. The nutrients are vital to our survival.

We often forget that, quite technically, our brain requires carbohydrates to function. Without carbs, we die. The more complex the carbs (longer they take to break down in the body and the longer they hold blood sugar stable) the better.

The more PROTEIN that is contained or combined with a complex carb, the better as it's more stable and won't cause sharp rises or drop in blood sugar but will give the body good sugars (which the brain and heart require - the whole body requires).

The more color it has the better, that is why vegetables are so good for us and why the darker the whole grain or legume, the better. Protein and fat ration to carbohydrates need to be in balance but we can't just leave out any one of those three groups.

Our bodies require protein, carbohydrates and fat. Just from the correct sources.
-

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Keebler
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-
Here are some good cookbooks - adaptations can be easily made with these. Notice all focus primarily on vegetables and seasoning is vital. Such richness here:

==================

www.christinacooks.com

CHRISTINA COOKS - Natural health advocate/ chef, Christina Pirello offers her comprehensive guide to living the well life.

Vegan, with a Mediterranean flair. Organic.

She was dx with terminal leukemia in her mid-twenties. Doctors said there was nothing more they could do. Among other things, she learned about complementary medicine and she learned how to cook whole foods. She recovered her health and is now a chef and professor of culinary arts.

She has program on the PBS network "Create" a couple times week. Check your PBS schedule.

To adapt: in the rare dishes where she uses wheat flour, it can just be left out for a fruit medley, etc. Brown Rice Pasta can be substituted (Tinkyada or Trader Joe's).

Regarding her use of brown rice syrup, just leave it out and add a touch of stevia at the end.

As she is vegan, all her recipes could stand alone for your plant-based meals - or the vegetables dishes can easily go along side fish or meat prepared in a healthy manner.

==================

www.rickbayless.com

Rick Bayless is a very good chef for MEXICAN meals that are healthy. These are heavy on vegetables.

====================

http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/

Spoonful of Ginger site

Books: http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/pages/books.php

A SPOONFUL OF GINGER (1999)

From Nina Simonds, the best-selling authority on Asian cooking, comes a ground-breaking cookbook based on the Asian philosophy of food as health-giving. The 200 delectable recipes she offers you not only taste superb but also have specific healing . . . .

. . . With an emphasis on the health-giving properties of herbs and spices, this book gives the latest scientific research as well as references to their tonic properties according to Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, the traditional Indian philosophy of medicine. . . .

You can find this at Amazon, too.

=========================

http://www.simply-natural.biz/Cure-Is-In-The-Kitchen.php

THE CURE IS IN THE KITCHEN, by Sherry A. Rogers M.D., is the first book to ever spell out in detail what all those people ate day to day who cleared their incurable diseases . . .

==========================

http://www.ecookbooks.com/p-4293-from-curries-to-kebabs.aspx

FROM CURRIES TO KEBABS - RECIPES FROM THE INDIAN SPICE TRAIL - by: Jaffrey, Madhur

==========================

Mediterranean Diet (minus the wheat and the wine) is also good. Quinoa and pure pomegranate juice (with a touch of stevia added) can be substituted.

===========================

Too many people here seem to try to starve themselves or deprive themselves. I've not eaten processed foods in 20 years so I don't even think about that and I suppose all the junk in supermarkets does go to a lot of homes. But, adjusting our idea of what food is really matters.

Getting the majority of nutrients we need more from food than from pills is best - and it's possible. And it can taste fabulous. There is no reason that gourmet food cannot be enjoyed every day, not regardless of health challenges but because health challenges make good food ever more so important.
-

[ 06-07-2010, 01:46 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Ahodge01
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Wow! Everyone, especially TF and Keebler, thanks for your replies.

Looking at this I havent been doing to bad on the diet.

Im just getting worried cause I still dont have a positive or single band showing up and two things really helped me.

1.) switching to the lyme diet
2.) ABX

the only problem I started them at the same time so I dont know if maybe im just dealing with a candida problem.

Lyme doctor was pretty amazed when my stony brook test came back completely negative so still looking for answers.

Stop ABX this friday to take the two weeks off to test with igenex so we will see.

Lymenet has been awesome in helping me figure out what is going on. Even if it isnt lyme related.

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Keebler
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-
As long as the word "diet" is used, it is likely to sink. If you think of adopting a new way of eating - for life - that will serve you well. Of course, some of the restrictions now may be lifted later but all food plans have some shifts all along the way.

In my experience, avoiding gluten has been a huge help. But, I do test with genetic celiac that was overlooked for decades. Still, I know of some people who avoid gluten just because they feel so much better without it.

============================

www.canlyme.com/seronegreasons.html

(27) REASONS WHY A SERONEGATIVE TEST RESULT MIGHT OCCUR

=============

Why are you getting tested at Stonybrook? Have you been tested through Igenex? Stoneybrook does not test all the bands.

Did you have IgM and IgG Western Blots?

Do you have an ILADS-educated LLMD?

Has your doctor assessed for the full range of tick-borne infections as well as some other stealth infections? Not everything is lyme. And lyme rarely travels alone.

In addition to the usual coinfections from ticks (such as babesia, bartonella, ehrlichia, RMSF, etc.), there are some other chronic stealth infections that an excellent LLMD should know about:

========================

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=069911#000000

TIMACA #6911 posted 03 August, 2008

I would encourage EVERY person who has received a lyme diagnosis to get the following tests.

- at link.
-

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TF
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My now famous lyme doctor tells his patients that they will feel 30 to 40% better just changing their diets.

One man told me this recently, and he said that it was true in his case. He changed his diet after the first appt and by the second appt, that's how much better he was.

This disease is really something, that's all I can say.

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