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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » EDS - can you get this from tick diseas, et al?

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Author Topic: EDS - can you get this from tick diseas, et al?
LisaK
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I think I have read you can, but not really sure ??

I suddenly notice my skin is really squishy and slightly sagging. I know age has something to do with it, but suddenly?

what would other SX be of a "slight" case of EDS????

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Be thankful in all things- even difficult times and sickness and trials - because there is something GOOD to be seen

Posts: 3327 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Jul 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
gnnmi
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LisaK

My Lyme doc said that Lyme is attracted to our connective tissue. For me, it caused POTS, which is also associated with EDS. I am in my sixties and was just diagnosed with all three this past year. the EDS never caused me much problem that I can remember, but I think I've had it all along and now it's just worse with the Lyme.

I was one point below the EDS score but the neurologist diagnosed me as EDS anyway, so I am guessing that means I have a mild case. My skin is more fragile now as well as saggy, and has always been extra soft. I was flexible when young but not excessively.

My elbows are at a strange angle and my posture is poor, signs of EDS along with easy bruising. The neurologist also checked my heels for little bumps that go away when I get off my feet. I guess they are a sign of connective tissue disorder.

I hope that helps.

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Lymetoo
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Lisa... I think it's genetic, but Lyme could trigger it to come forth.

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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LisaK
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gnnmi, that is interesting.
especially about the bumps. definitely I have bumps. I thought that was just normal for some people???

my grandmother had really exaggerated saggy upper arms. mine are starting to do that. I am not that heavy or anything but always had big arms and now they are 'drooping'.

I know age plays a role, but how much? and I have always looked younger than my age.

lymetoo, yes genetic. do you know what gene?

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Be thankful in all things- even difficult times and sickness and trials - because there is something GOOD to be seen

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sammy
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EDS is genetic. Typically a Geneticist will diagnose you based on clinical exam & results of your genetic tests for EDS.

So no, Lyme cannot give you this, only your parents can!

(There are several types of EDS and each type has it’s own special set of genetic markers. So you could be tested for lots of different genes.)

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LymeCFIDSMCS
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Borrelia damages/eats collagen, so I think what happens in many cases is a kind of pseudo-EDS, as yet another thing Lyme imitates. I also personally think that many people who have chronic Lyme and also M.E. likely have underlying genetics for connective tissue disease, hence why all can induce severe POTS.

See this: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23986790

Open Neurol J. 2012 Dec 31;6:179-86. doi: 10.2174/1874205X01206010179. eCollection 2012.
Damage of collagen and elastic fibres by borrelia burgdorferi - known and new clinical and histopathological aspects.

Müller KE1.
Author information

Abstract
Lyme Borreliosis, or Lyme's disease, manifests itself in numerous skin conditions. Therapeutic intervention should be initiated as soon as a clinical diagnosis of erythema migrans is made.

The histopathology of some of the skin conditions associated with Lyme Borreliosis is characterised by structural changes to collagen, and sometimes also elastic fibres. These conditions include morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. More recently, further skin conditions have been identified by the new microscopic investigation technique of focus floating microscopy: granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica, necrobiotic xanthogranuloma, erythema annulare centrifugum, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, cutaneous sarcoidosis and lymphocytic infiltration; these conditions also sometimes cause changes in the connective tissue.

In the case of ligaments and tendons, collagen and elastic fibres predominate structurally. They are also the structures that are targeted by Borrelia. The resultant functional disorders have previously only rarely been associated with Borreliosis in clinical practice.

Ligamentopathies and tendinopathies, spontaneous ruptures of tendons after slight strain, dislocation of vertebrae and an accumulation of prolapsed intervertebral discs as well as ossification of tendon insertions can be viewed in this light.

KEYWORDS:
Lyme Borreliosis; collagen fibres; connective tissue; diverticulum.; elastic fibres; ligaments; skin; tendons

PMID: 23986790 PMCID: PMC3751012 DOI: 10.2174/1874205X01206010179

Posts: 924 | From Massachusetts | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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