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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » How many probiotics are actually in yogurt?

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Author Topic: How many probiotics are actually in yogurt?
lymegal23
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I know yogurt contains live active cultures . and I know organic greek yogurt tends to contain the most strains of them, but I was wondering if on average anyone knows how many CFU's of probiotics yogurt contains?
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Keebler
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None in most brands. The heat processing during pasteurization destroys it all.

What brand are you wondering about? Get an organic brand from somewhere near you, or at least in your geographic region.

These usually do not advertise but, in my region, we can get Nancy's.

Unsweetened, not exposed to heat improves your chances. Read the label to be sure it states ____ LIVE cultures and the strains. It will usually state: LIVE cultures added AFTER pasteurization.

Find one that is similar to this, from as close to your home as possible:

=====================

www.nancysyogurt.com

Nancy's Yogurt

. . . hormone-free milk . . .

http://www.nancysyogurt.com/making_our_products/live_cultures.php

Live Cultures

Springfield Creamery was the first to use live acidophilus and bifidum cultures in yogurt over 30 years ago. We use several strains of cultures which are added after pasteurization -- each spoonful of yogurt contains billions of live, active cultures, providing you with continual health benefits.

. . . (cultures are listed) . . . Etc.


http://www.nancysyogurt.com/contact/faq.php

FAQ
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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www.makeyourownyogurt.com

Make your own yogurt

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?client=safari&rls=en&q=Yogurt+maker&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=6404749433034133550&ei=zAhFTc7vPIyksQPGqdScCg&sa=X&oi=product_catalog_result&c t=result&resnum=3&ved=0CF0Q8wIwAg#ps-sellers

Salton Yogurt Maker
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WhitneyS
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I dont think thats correct-- the milk in yogurt would be pasteurized prior to it becoming yogurt, otherwise it would be liquid and not solid. Organic would not make any difference in the amount of bacteria either.

The container even says "live active cultures". I don't know that there would be a real way to determine how many bacteria are in yogurt....but it doesnt hurt to eat a lot!

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Keebler
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The label will disclose whether the cultures are live and if added after pasteurization or other heat processing that can occur along the processing line.

If it does not say LIVE, then just avoid it.

I mentioned organic so as to avoid the farm chemicals from the feed that wind up in the yogurt - and rBGH, the bovine growth hormone given to most dairy cattle, unless otherwise stated.

I suggested organic also because it's easier to get that plain, without sugar and without aspartame (which is neuro-toxic) or other additives and dyes.

Organically raised cattle graze on grass which is best. They also spend far more time outside and that makes for a happier cow and a better quality milk.
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Keebler
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For the typical supermarket yogurt, it appears that pasteurization occurs at two points, first in pre-treatment - then again in post-fermentation.
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http://www.eng.umd.edu/~nsw/ench485/lab8.htm

YOGURT FERMENTATION WITH LACTOBACILLUS CULTURES

- by Nam Sun Wang - University of Maryland
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Excerpt:

. . . The culture in fresh yogurt is healthier and more active than that in an outdated one. A stale one is also more likely to be contaminated with undesirable microorganisms, so check the expiration date.

If possible, choose the "All-Natural" variety, because stabilizers and additives, included to suppress microbial activities, are generally harmful to the culture. . . .

. . . In summary, commercial yogurt production is composed of the following steps:

pretreatment of milk (standardization, fortification, lactose hydrolysis), homogenization, heat treatment,

cooling to incubation temperature, inoculation with starter, fermentation, cooling,

post-fermentation treatment (flavoring, fruit addition, pasteurization), refrigeration/freezing, and packaging . . . .

=======================

Be aware that "All-Natural" does not necessarily mean what we think, though.
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Abxnomore
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Not enough to be effective for any one on ABX and trying to keep the levels of good flora up.
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Blackstone
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Normal store-brands there isn't enough to make any kind of difference.

Certified Organic brands will often list the strains and sometimes the amount of organisms of each. These typically contain at least 3-5 strains in significant potency. Kefir is even a better choice, as it contains 10-12 strains at higher amounts - Lifeway Organic Kefir is one of the best tasting I've found, and they have lowfat options as well. I buy their Lowfat Organic Strawberry and Cream or Mixed Berries flavor.

Of course, you can always make your own yogurt or kefir in whatever medium you wish if you can't find one to your liking.

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lymie_in_md
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I suggest you make your own. It's not that difficult if you get a yogurt maker. With a yogurt maker, you not only can make yogurt, but kefir as well.

I feel it is better to take probiotics as food then in pill form. Just my opinion! There is more to the organism and food relationship then is published. Saurkraut (helpful acids), Natto (nattokinase / vitamin k2), cultured butter (again vitamin k2), the washington post on December 29, 2010 did an extensive article on the health benefits of kombucha.

I guess I enventually pushed for the more natural alternative despite having very little time to do so.

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Bob

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Lymetoo
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NOT MUCH!!! Then you have all that sugar to contend with. Counterproductive, if you ask me.

(I'm referring to store bought.)

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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wgshuckers
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lymetoo,
I agree. Yogurt has so much sugar in it that I don't think it's worthwhile to eat it. Seems like all that sugar would do more damage than the live cultures would help.

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lymie_in_md
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There are two points: with pill form, where do the probiotics end up, at the top of the small intestines and do they survice coming out of dormant state? Food based probiotics travel the entire digestive track and as the food is being absorbed so are the beneficial bacteria. How do you imagine the dynamic of pill form is taking.

Let me clarify: CFU stated on most probiotic pill containers is at time of manufacture: They go down as time goes on as well as food based. A serving of stonyfields delivers about 1 billion CFUs by the time you eat it. It doesn't sound like the whopping numbers the pill form delivers. But what are you getting with the pill form, any vitamins or healthy acids you get with food based. And while on ABX due to bacteria being populated and depopulated. The food based might be delivering nutrition you body can no longer create. So may be the best approach is to do both while on ABX. If not doing ABX or during a stretch when your taking a break, consider food based probiotics.

Homemade yogurt according to the healing crow (link below) may deliver 1.5 trillion organisms per bowl -- sounds a little more then NOT MUCH. Homemade yogurt is just plain yogurt all sugar had been digested by the organisms (why this dairy product is better tolerated then straight milk) the lactose is now lactase. I make a quart at a time, the grass fed cow milk costs under 4 dollars, the culture is pennies. The yogurt maker -- under 50 dollars. Shouldn't bust the bank! Instead of milk -- I'll put yogurt on oatmeal.

http://pecanbread.com/healingcrow/ferfun/conspiracy/conspiracy.html

The following link explains the added benefit of food based probiotics:

http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1226478

Great article on probiotics both pill based and food based and the difference. The article stated Kashi had made a probiotic cereal containing 1 billion cfu per serving. So take your probiotic pill in the morning and then enjoy Kashi and instead of milk throw on some stonyfields yogurt and get 2 billion cfu.

http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/nutri/probiotic-food.asp

A link to stonyfields site:

http://www.stonyfield.com/organic_living/wellness_and_nutrition/healthy_tips_library/replenish_your_probiotics/index.jsp

I eat at least two different probiotic food based items a day. Today it was home made yogurt and store bought Natto.

--------------------
Bob

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Lymetoo
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I drink the VSL#3 DS.. I would think it is easily absorbed.

(note, I DID say "store bought" was counterproductive)

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Munch
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I've been making my own yogurt for over 32 years.
I have allergies to corn & soy so making my own assures that I am not "corn fed" or "soy fed" by accident.

We can also avoid all the sugar, HFCS and other processed gunk like: food stabilizers, thickeners, aspartame, chemicals and things I can't pronounce on the label of commercial yogurt. Once a person gets used to not eating chemicals in their food, it is very difficult to consume them.

I follow a Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) recipe because I am lactose intolerant. Most of the lactose has been converted to lactase when the milk is boiled and strained then fermented for 24 hours.

I have no stomach issues from eating the yogurt I've made which is not true for commercial yogurt. I have never seen commercial yogurt with 1.5 trillion CFUs on the label either.

It's a very simple process which takes only a few minutes to measure the milk into a pan. My yogurt maker has seven 6 oz jars with lids. So I take 42 oz of milk and heat it until it starts to climb up the sides of the pan.

Then I let it cool to under 100 degrees, using a candy thermometer hooked to the side of the pan.
If the starter culture is put in while the milk is too hot the cultures are killed.

I've been using 6 oz of organic Greek yogurt or one jar for starter culture. I rotate brands to get different bacteria strains. Organic half & half makes the thickest yogurt. It is thick enough to substitute for sour cream in any recipe plus I make my own salad dressings using plain yogurt.

After cooling the yogurt, I flavor it by adding pureed fresh or frozen berries, vanilla & honey, agave nectar, peaches, and/or whatever strikes our fancy.

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bcb1200
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Kefir has a lot. There is a new brand coming out in the NYC area called Maia which has 50B per serving. Very tasty.

--------------------
Bite date ?
2/10 symptoms began
5/10 dx'd, after 3 months numerous test and doctors

IgM Igenex +/CDC +
+ 23/25, 30, 31, 34, 41, 83/93

Currently on:

Currently at around 80% +/- most days.

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wgshuckers
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You think it's safe to drink/eat Kefir on abx? I've looked at the bottles and they are LOADED with sugar.
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