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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » steriod inhaler and lyme?

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Author Topic: steriod inhaler and lyme?
Laura_W
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Ok, from a previous post I understand that taking Medrol or other oral steriods... or even injectable cortico-steriods will flare up lyme.

So, my next question is...

What about using an inhaler? Like an albuterol inhaler?

--------------------
10/10 EIA 1.4+, 41 (IGG), 23 (IGM)
Bitten over 20 years ago.
Currently not treating, looking for a Dr who will work with my insurance lol.

More muscular, cognitive, nerve issues than joints. Facial droop and blurred vision.

Posts: 323 | From Michigan | Registered: Apr 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TF
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I sure wouldn't do it. Any steroid taken into your body--whether through the nose, the mouth, or an injection into the joint--will have the same effect. It will weaken your immune system.

If taken for weeks, it will likely shut down your immune system. Then, lyme and company have nothing killing them except your antibiotics.

I would be concerned about this.

Read this post I made about Nasonex nasal spray and what it did to me:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/105860?

From Burrascano:

"More evidence has accumulated indicating the severe detrimental effects of the concurrent use of immunosuppressants including steroids in the patient with active B. burgdorferi infection. Never give steroids or any other immunosuppressant to any patient who may even remotely be suffering from Lyme, or serious, permanent damage may result, especially if given for anything greater than a short course. If immunosuppressive therapy is absolutely necessary, then potent antibiotic treatment should begin at least 48 hours prior to the immunosuppressants." (page 11, Burrascano Lyme Treatment Guidelines)

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

And:

"However, attention must be paid to all treatment modalities for such a recovery- not only antibiotics, but rehab and exercise programs, nutritional supplements, enforced rest, low carbohydrate, high fiber diets, attention to food sensitivities, avoidance of stress, abstinence from caffeine and alcohol, and absolutely no immunosuppressants, even local doses of steroids (intra-articular injections, for example)." (page 20)

There are many other statements just like the above throughout the Guidelines.

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TF
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Notice the statement above by Burrascano:

"absolutely no immunosuppressants"

So, that includes inhalers.

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BackinStOlaf
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But you need to breathe....

what a dilemma

--------------------
First Symptom 9/09
Multiple docs, negative Labcorp test
LLMD: 1/10
Positive Igenex/CDC test
Treatment 2/10
2/10-8/10 Amox, ceftin, zith, flagyl
Currently: Bicillin, Minocycline, still dealing with severe breathing issues

 -

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Lymetoo
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Albuterol is not a steroid, so it is OK.

Any steroid inhaler will cause problems down the line with immune suppression. But if your asthma is really bad, you may have to use one.

I used to use the steroid inhaler once a day instead of twice and I recently was able to get off of it.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Laura_W
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Lymetoo... I didn't realize it wasn't a steriod. Thanks.

--------------------
10/10 EIA 1.4+, 41 (IGG), 23 (IGM)
Bitten over 20 years ago.
Currently not treating, looking for a Dr who will work with my insurance lol.

More muscular, cognitive, nerve issues than joints. Facial droop and blurred vision.

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kidsgotlyme
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my daughter has to use Pulmicort, which I'm pretty sure is a steroid. She also has to use a nasal spray.

She has to use these or her asthma flares up and she can't breathe.

She seems to be doing well on her lyme treatment.

--------------------
symptoms since 1993 that I can remember. 9/2018 diagnosed with Borellia, Babesia Duncani, and Bartonella Hensalae thru DNA Connections.

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Razzle
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Things that help Asthma that do not contain steroids:

Bronchodilator inhalers, such as Albuterol, Xopenex, etc.

Singulair - won't help an acute asthma attack, but should help reduce the occurrance/severity of asthma attacks.

Magnesium (high-dose) - can help an acute attack if given in high enough doses - magnesium is a natural muscle relaxer and can help relax the airway to enable easier breathing.

Celery (eat the entire bunch every day; may juice the celery and drink it instead of eating the whole bunch) - I know someone who got rid of her Asthma by doing this (she was not taking any other medications for Asthma, so it had to be the celery that helped).

Eucalyptus essential oil - apply to feet during the asthma attack...it dilates the bronchi.

Deep breathing exercises - can help retrain the body to make better use of oxygen, and also the airway exercise seems to help reduce the severity of asthma attacks.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids (fish oil) - anti-inflammatory - can help reduce airway inflammation. Will not stop an acute asthma attack, but may help reduce severity and frequency of attacks.

Vitamin C - high dose (1000-3000mg/day). Acts as a natural antihistamine. Can reduce allergic inflammation in the airway (and elsewhere in the body). May or may not help with an acute asthma attack, but should help with preventing attacks or reducing the severity of asthm attacks.

Quercetin - a vitamin C relative that has anti-inflammatory and antihistamine properties. Should help with prevention of asthma attacks but won't stop an acute attack.

Homeopathic remedies - consult a Naturopathic or Homeopathic physician, as homeopathic prescribing must be customized to the individual. Bryonia Alba is one of the recommended remedies (it is for asthma and bronchitis), but again, it may or may not work for you specifically. There are other remedies that may be helpful.

I know there are other herbs, but can't think of them off the top of my head...maybe CI can chime in here...?

And as always, make sure you discuss these things with your doctors and pharmacist prior to starting any of them...

Take care,

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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Lemon-Lyme
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Ideally one could avoid inhaled steroids, but if you have to use it... use it. Not being able to breathe can't be very good for the immune system either.

I personally wouldn't worry about it at low doses or nasal steroids, but going with higher doses of some inhaled steroids longterm would worry me.

Two alternatives:

Well, not so much an alternative, but an inhaled steroid which shouldn't absorb systematically to any major degree -- Alvesco. It's somewhat newish, but it almost all absorbs in the lungs.

Intal/cromolyn solution. Intal has been discontinued in the US, but some other countries still offer it. For those who use a nebulizer, I think they still offer cromolyn as a prescription solution.
It's the same as OTC nasalcrom spray, but used for asthma instead of your nose.

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Al
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I've been on an inhaled steroid for 3 years; I have no choice until they come up with a new non steroid replacement.
It has lowered my immune system. I've had pneumonia 2 times. My lyme treatment is hampered
somewhat but I manage.

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DoctorLuddite
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A commonly used steroid in inhalers is Fluticasone, and the flu- prefix indicates that there is fluoride in it...fluoride displaces iodine in thyroid metabolism, and that can be very detrimental to health, Lyme or otherwise. There are steroids that do not have fluoride in them, if a steroid is necessary (and if adrenal fatigue is an issue, then steroid support may be indicated) then a fluoride free compound would be the lesser of two evils.
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