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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Are buckwheat, millet, and quinoa really okay on an anti-yeast diet?

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Author Topic: Are buckwheat, millet, and quinoa really okay on an anti-yeast diet?
James1979
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The Body Ecology Diet suggests that the "seed-like grains", like buckwheat, millet, and quinoa, are okay on an anti-yeast diet.

Do other anti-yeast diets agree that those "seed-like grains" are okay? I'm a little confused with this, because those grains seem to be very starchy and high in carbohydrates, and I can't see why the yeast wouldn't prefer those over any other grains.

Thanks for the advice.

BTW I think he lists "amaranth" also as a "seed-like grain"... but amaranth is just yucky! [Smile]

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Sheryl777
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I'm doing a special diet myself although mine is to comply with LDA (low dose antigen) allergy requirements as put forth by Dr. Shrader. Every morning for breakfast I eat an alternative grain (amaranth, teff, quinoa, millet, buckwheat, ein korn farro, emmer).

The raw food people say that you should soak grains for 24 hours before eating to remove a natural pesticide that the plants produce to protect themselves from insects. This is similar to what you need to do when sprouting. The color in the water the next day is supposed to be the pesticide.

I'm quite used to doing the soaking now and it has become automatic. I've come to like the different grains each morning.

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Lymetoo
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I think it's OK because they are not "white" like a real grain.

I've never eaten any of those except buckwheat. I'm gluten intolerant and I think millet is not OK on that list. Buckwheat pancakes are very good but I've only had them a few times.

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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lymeboy
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I hope so, because I eat Quinoa every day!
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philly78
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I ate them but only one serving a day while I had yeast symptoms. I read somewhere it should be limited to that.

Now I eat two servings sometimes, but yeast isn't currently a problem.

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When faced with pain you have two choices....either quit and accept the circumstances, OR make the decision to fight with all the resources you have at your disposal.

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nefferdun
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Those are medium glycemic index foods and probably safe. My son is diabetic and he can eat those without raising his blood sugar.
Quinoa is one of the best foods you can eat because it is a complete protein.

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old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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ukcarry
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I agree with other posts about quinoa: it is high in protein, unlike true grains and, in my opinion, is very good when you are on an anti-candida diet.

Infact last night we ate roast chicken, mixed leaves and a lovely tabouleh-type salad made from quinoa, tomatoes, cucumber, parsley, black olives, lemon and olive oil: it was a lovely meal in hot weather!

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James1979
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Thanks for all the answers, peeps! [Smile]

How about this one: If quinoa is okay because its high in protein and not as starchy, then wouldn't beans also be okay because they have a similar composition? I couldn't figure out why beans wouldn't be included in the Body Ecology Diet, but I wonder if other anti-yeast diets allow beans.

Thanks again! [Smile]

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philly78
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With the BED, beans are considered an acid forming food and are hard to digest. If we don't digest our foods properly, this causes fermentation.

Quinoa is considered an alkaline forming food.

It is mentioned in the book that once your gut begins to heal and is stronger, you can introduce beans into the diet.

The BED is rather strict imo. I followed much of the advice but not all. I ate beans but just soaked and sprouted them. Same with nuts. If I were to have followed the BED diet as restrictive as suggested, I would be way too thin. I'm struggling to stay at 98 lbs.

Not all anti-yeast diets restrict beans. Here is another site I found helpful. Some good recipes in the forums as well.

http://www.wholeapproach.com/candida/

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When faced with pain you have two choices....either quit and accept the circumstances, OR make the decision to fight with all the resources you have at your disposal.

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