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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Hand-Foot Syndrome, for those who have hot, numb and painful palms and soles

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Author Topic: Hand-Foot Syndrome, for those who have hot, numb and painful palms and soles
Dave6002
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Hand-Foot Syndrome

Other terms: Palmar-Plantar Erythrodysesthesia; PPE

What is hand-foot syndrome?

Also called hand-foot syndrome or hand-to-foot syndrome, Palmar-Plantar Erythrodysesthesia is a side effect, which can occur with several types of chemotherapy or biologic therapy drugs used to treat cancer. For example, Capecitabine (Xeloda), 5-Flurouracil (5FU), continuous-infusion doxorubicin, doxorubicin liposomal (Doxil), and high-dose Interleukin-2 can cause this skin reaction for some patients. Following administration of chemotherapy, small amounts of drug leak out of very small blood vessels called capillaries in the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Exposure of your hands and feet to heat as well as friction on your palms and soles increases the amount of drug in the capillaries and increases the amount of drug leakage. This leakage of drug results in redness, tenderness, and possibly peeling of the palms and soles. The redness, also known as palmar-plantar erythema, looks like sunburn. The areas affected can become dry and peel, with numbness or tingling developing. Hand-foot syndrome can be uncomfortable and can interfere with your ability to carry out normal activities.

Things you can do if you suspect hand-foot syndrome (Palmar-Plantar Erythrodysesthesia):

Prevention: Prevention is very important in trying to reduce the development of hand-foot syndrome. Actions taken to prevent hand-foot syndrome will help reduce the severity of symptoms should they develop.

This involves modifying some of your normal daily activities to reduce friction and heat exposure to your hands and feet for a period of time following treatment (approximately one week after IV medication, much as possible during the time you are taking oral (by mouth) medication such as capcitabine).
Avoid long exposure of hands and feet to hot water such as washing dishes, long showers, or tub baths.
Short showers in tepid water will reduce exposure of the soles of your feet to the drug.
Dishwashing gloves should not be worn, as the rubber will hold heat against your palms.
Avoid increased pressure on the soles of the feet or palms of hands.
No jogging, aerobics, power walking, jumping - avoid long days of walking.
You should also avoid using garden tools, household tools such as screwdrivers, and other tasks where you are squeezing your hand on a hard surface.
Using knives to chop food may also cause excessive pressure and friction on your palms.

Cooling procedures:

Cold may provide temporary relief for pain and tenderness caused by hand-foot syndrome.
Placing the palms or bottoms of your feet on an ice pack or a bag of frozen peas may be very comforting. Alternate on and off for 15-20 minutes at a time.
Lotions:

Rubbing lotion on your palms and soles should be avoided during the same period, although keeping these areas moist is very important between treatments.
Emollients such as Aveeno, Lubriderm, Udder Cream, and Bag Balm provide excellent moisturizing to your hands and feet.
Pain relief:

Over the counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) may be helpful to relieve discomfort associated with hand-foot syndrome. Check with your doctor.
Vitamins:

Taking Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) may be beneficial to preventing and treating Plantar-Palmar Erythrodysesthesia, and should be discussed with your doctor.
Drugs/treatment changes that may be prescribed by your doctor:

Chemotherapy treatments may need to be interrupted or the dose adjusted to prevent worsening of hand-foot syndrome.
When to call your doctor or health care professional:

If you notice that your palms or soles become red or tender. This most often occurs before any peeling, and recommendations for relief of discomfort can be given. If you are on chemotherapy pills, you may be asked to hold treatment, or need your dose adjusted to prevent worsening of symptoms.
Note: We strongly encourage you to talk with your health care professional about your specific medical condition and treatments. The information contained in this website is meant to be helpful and educational, but is not a substitute for medical advice.

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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The posted the following in 2006 and I still have these symptoms:

"These symptoms all started about one month after I fell ill.

At beginning, I couldn't tolerate them especially when I wore gloves and shoes or my palms/soles were pressed by walking, standing or using computer.

Now after over half of a year, The symptoms still persist although bearable: hot, numb and painful palms and soles;

the parts of my palms would become red and painfull when they are pressed by using computer or holding a book.

But it seems they are healing (very very slow) by themselves not touched by any medicine I took for Bbs, Bart. and Babesia.


My question is what infection(s) contributes to these symptoms?

Who else also have this? I was wondering if these are symptoms of tick-borne-diseases"

These symptoms are very similar to those of Hand-Foot Syndrome, which is caused by some chemo-therapies.

Lyme pains may have similar mechanism: "...small amounts of toxin leak out of very small blood vessels called capillaries in the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Exposure of your hands and feet to heat as well as friction on your palms and soles increases the amount of toxin in the capillaries and increases the amount of toxin leakage. This leakage of toxin results in redness, tenderness, and possibly peeling of the palms and soles. The redness, also known as palmar-plantar erythema, looks like sunburn." quoted from the above but I replaced "drug" with toxin.

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CD57
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up
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Lymetoo
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bartonella???

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Toppers
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Bartonella
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Razzle
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Sounds like Bart to me...

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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GiGi
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Toxic metals - gravity - move to the lower body areas: jaw, forearms and hands, reproductive areas,prostate, ovarian cysts, knees, feet.
When because of low perfusion/lack of blood/oxygenation the bacteria move in - we start to feel it.

It's the total body burden that gets us into trouble, not only the infections.

That is why lowering the toxic burden early on is so important. We can't get rid of the infections as long as the terrain is contaminated.

Take care.

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Dave6002
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Glad you guys brought up this topic and thanks to everybody.

However, I have been treated with bartonella for several years now but the symptoms never improved.

I would describe my pains as general body pains everywhere(there is pressure, there is a pain),but the pains in palms and soles are more obvious and painful. The cause of the pains would be due to poor blood circulation, I agree with GiGi:low perfusion/lack of blood/oxygenation, or accumulation of toxins.

Probably because the palms and soles have more capillaries, they are mostly affected. This may also apply to Hand-Foot Syndrome: poorer circulation, more toxins, more pains.

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
elainer97
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Not sure if my problem is the same but for the last several years I've had a problem with my hands, feet and nose like this.

Usually they stay cold but in certain circumstances they become red, hot and puffy. It's so uncomfortable ( not to mention unsightly). I can't even wear shoes that show any part of my foot b/c if I walk or stand much and it's the least bit warm, my feet puff up and look terrible!

Using the computer mouse at work wud make my thumb and first finger become red and hot. I had ppl comment on how red my hands were- embarrassing. And even more when my nose does it. My husband calls me Rudolph. Funny guy :/
Makeup can only do so much.

They all become very dry and flake too, better if I keep moisturized. No doc has been able to tell me what the problem is or how to fix it. I just try to stay cool.
Haven't been to the LLMD yet. Was hoping treatment would fix it eventually. It feels miserable.

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GiGi
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Some of the circulatory problems may have to do with CCSVI in the neck area and the biofilm problem in general. It will also be worse if you are on blood thinning enzymes, etc. We know that many of us have CCSVI and thinning the blood causes more thinner stronger flow through the same narrow vessels causing swelling of different areas.

What to do about it is the next question.

Posts: 9834 | From Washington State | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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Elainer, your symptoms sound like mine in some ways, but more sound like an allergic reaction, or at least allergic reactions were involved.
Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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GiGi, thanks. The biofilm and circulatory problems sound interesting.
Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
elainer97
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I've always felt like it was a circulatory problem- going from cold to hot etc. I have had body temp issues for a long time tho. Had low thyroid for about 5-6 yrs and this yr had to get off thyroid meds - were making me hyperthyroid - so now I'm normal? Crazy!

That said, my hands feet nose issues didn't start til after I started thryroid meds. But I've been off the med for 6 wks wth no change in that area.

Having been sick for well over 20 yrs, I shud b used to crazy symptoms by now [Smile] (but I'm not!)

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chootik
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Similar issue but a little different.

My right leg and arm have gradually felt numb and colder than usual. It's never warm and it doesn't swell up. However my nose is also cold a lot and gets red.

My Accupuncturist said it's from inflamation. she gave me a Korean Tea and it actually got better but it was expensive so I had to stop. Sure enough the numbness returned.

I've noticed it gets better with herbs and Anti Oxidant supps. So it's prob. the inflamation effecting our circulation and causing these issues.

Also Gigi is right I've heard heavy metals can give you numbness.

Dave did you try antioxidant or anti inflamatory supps?

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Dave6002
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I always felt cold, occasionally hot. After sitting for a while in an air conditioned room, I felt cold and seemed that my body couldn't adjust the temperature. Now I found that eating fermented rice can bring up the temperature and I don't feel cold often. The fermented rice may also have other benefits even can cure diseases? I am experimenting.
Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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chootik, yes. In another thread, I introduce a tea/vegetable juice recipe, which may have antioxidant or anti inflammatory function. After drinking it, sometime I feel so good almost think I am normal.
Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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How to make sweet fermented rice:

http://sunflower-recipes.blogspot.com/2011/02/homemade-sweet-fermented-rice.html

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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