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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Infant gut microbiota is protective against cow's milk allergy

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Author Topic: Infant gut microbiota is protective against cow's milk allergy
Dave6002
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Infant gut microbiota is protective against cow's milk allergy in mice despite immature ileal T-cell response

Abstract: Faecal microbiota of healthy infant displays a large abundance of Bifidobacterium spp. and Bacteroides spp.

Although some studies have reported an association between these two genera and allergy, these findings remain a subject of debate.

Using a gnotobiotic mouse model of cow's milk allergy, we investigated the impact of an infant gut microbiota mainly composed of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides spp. on immune activation and allergic manifestations.

The transplanted microbiota failed to restore an ileal T-cell response similar to the one observed in conventional mice. This may be due to the low bacterial translocation into Peyer's patches in gnotobiotic mice.

The allergic response was then monitored in germ-free, gnotobiotic, and conventional mice after repeated oral sensitization with whey proteins and cholera toxin.

Colonized mice displayed a lower drop of rectal temperature upon oral challenge with beta-lactoglobulin, lower plasma mMCP-1, and lower anti-BLG IgG1 than germ-free mice.

The foxp3 gene was highly expressed in the ileum of both colonized mice that were protected against allergy.

This study is the first demonstration that a transplanted healthy infant microbiota mainly composed of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides had a protective impact on sensitization and food allergy in mice despite altered T-cell response in the ileum

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sparkle7
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I'm not trying to be "smart" but where are they going with this? Is this really meant to be applied to people or are they looking for ways to grow humans in a lab?

I wish they would stop creating genetically modified mice to torture. No offense, Dave6002... I just wonder about this kind of stuff.

Posts: 7772 | From Northeast, again... | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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sparkle7,

I understand what you said about animal study.

However, believe or not, animal study is well under regulation in the US and other countries and torture of a mouse is illegal, every experiment on mice before being carried out must be approved by a committee.

Similarities between mouse and human genes range from about 70% to 90%, with an average of 85% similarity but a lot of variation from gene to gene (e.g., some mouse and human gene products are almost identical, while others are nearly unrecognizable as close relatives).

We have gained tremendous knowledge related to human health by using mouse models.

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
marypart
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This kind of research is quite important for anybody with arthritis, ms, rheumatoid arthritis or reactive arthritis. It is also important for IBS, Colitis, and Crohn's.

The reason is, researchers around the world are clearly realizing that these diseases often begin with problems with the microbiome in the gut.

In fact, several researchers are doing Fecal Transplants and successfully treating inflammatory bowel diseases and especially, clostridium dificile.

Google Fecal Transpant and Barody to see what is happening in Australia. There is someone in NY, I think at NYU, who is looking at Fecal Transplants for IBS, Colitis and Crohn's.

You can find people on the internet who are doing it successfully AT HOME using family members as healthy donors. An many of them are actually using baby's poop figuring it is the most likely to not be infected with anything dangerous.

Just saying-- the research is not crazy.

--------------------
Son, 26, Dx Lyme 4/10, Babs 8/10
Had serious arthritis, all gone.
Currently on Valtrex
Daughter, 26,bullseye 7/11
arthritis in knees, cured and off all meds. .
Self:Lyme, bart, sxs gone, no longer treating.

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sparkle7
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Yes, I know... I read the research about the fecal implants & about the human biome research. (I thnk the fecal implant doctor is in CA - or one of them, anyway) It's really fascinating. I just wonder about these things.

There are many times that humans have been used for testing without their consent - even in this country. I know there are many great things that can be learned by doing research. Some of this research can be used for nefarious purposes, too. I'm a bit cynical after all these years.

When I start reading about the studies to replicate human milk with special probiotics, chimeras, gene splicing, animals with human genes, putting implants in people's brains or arms to control computers or as identity chips - I just think of the idea of "Frankenstein"...

I think its very hard to recolonize your intestinal tract with beneficial bacteria when you are an adult. From what I've read, you really need to be exposed to that stuff when you are a baby. I could be mistaken, though. The fecal implants may work...?

PS - Maybe the doctor I was reading about in CA was the one who was telling people to eat a parasite eggs to infect themselves with hookwork (I think it was) for irratible bowel syndrome or some intestinal tract disease...?

Posts: 7772 | From Northeast, again... | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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