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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Distilled Water + Minerals

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Author Topic: Distilled Water + Minerals
canefan17
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Does anyone here buy distilled water jugs and add trace minerals to them?
Posts: 5394 | From Houston, Tx | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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-
Just wondering why distilled water? Distilled water can leach out minerals and most of it comes in plastic bottles (not good).

Some trace minerals brands also come in plastic bottles. Even if BPA-free, plastic bottles can leech out all kinds of petroleum chemicals.

Why not just buy a good water that has some minerals already in it - in glass if you have to buy bottled water -

- or a good water filter?

http://www.mountainvalleyspring.com/bottled-water-packaging.aspx

Mountain Valley Water - glass bottles available.
-

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canefan17
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I like the idea of using distilled water (7.0 pH, neutral) for detox. And having clean water with the ability to add natural mineral sources to the water. (maple syrup, lemon, honey)

And yes distilled water is neutral irregardless of what Mercola and others say. They are testing with human pH strips (designed for urine and saliva - NOT water) and trying to claim it's acidic. Hogwash, imo.

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elainer97
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I have been drinking distilled water from plastic jugs for about 6 or 7 yrs now. I hated it being in plastic but didn't have a glass option. Within the next month I am going to get a water filter for my kitchen sink - haven't decided on distilled or reverse osmosis.

I love the taste of the distilled. About 2 mths ago I started adding minerals and I hate it. Tastes like a dirty sock has been steeped in it. I don't feel a bit different after adding the minerals. Maybe need more time.

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MichaelTampa
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Canefan, I considered this recently as part of trying to decide on approach to drinking water. We ended up changing from one filter approach to another filter approach. My pendulum was always strongly against distilled water, even with a variety of popular/well-known mineral supplements, including ones that have pendulum tested well in other waters at different points in time. While reverse osmosis had a chance in this contest, the distilled water was a clear loser and as hard as I tried to make it work, I could not.

I also have tested pH of store-bought distilled water, based on hearing it is acidic. Didn't hear it from Mercola, but did hear it. I remember it being somewhere around pH of 5. I was using some testers that I had used successfully for testing used vegetable oil as part of the biodiesel making process (pH tells you how much potassium hydroxide you need to add). I was very surprised at to hear this "pure H2O" could be acidic, which is why I was motivated to test it, but the results speak for themselves, surprising as it was to me.

I did drink distilled water for about a decade, and changed more due to wanting some approach that used less electricity (distillers use a lot of electricity). But a couple/few years later, when many health problems really kicked in (timing unrelated to approach to water), and had access to energetic testing (first practitioner, then learned to do it myself), I never got any good answers with distilled water, ever. Granted, that is just my body with its own situation and issues.

I find the pH situation hard to dispute. Find any pH measurement approach and do it for yourself.

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emla999/Lyme
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The pH of distilled water is largely influenced by how much carbon dioxide the distilled water has absorbed. Distilled water can absorb carbon dioxide from the air and this reaction will cause carbonic acid to form in the distilled water and this will cause the pH to drop and become acidic. But when distilled water is properly made by using a sealed/closed system and when all of the carbon dioxide has been filtered out then the pH of distilled water will be around 7.0


http://www.ehow.com/facts_7625413_distilled-water-acidic-alkaline.html#ixzz1ltfevceX


"Hypothetically, distilled water should always be at a neutral pH 7. Immediately upon being exposed to air, however, distilled water's pH decreases and becomes more acidic. Neutralizing distilled water is possible, but its neutral pH does not last."


I have a home water distiller that is an unclosed system so the water is exposed to air for a short period of time and thus it is exposed to carbon dioxide and the pH of my freshly made distilled water is usually around 6.6 - 6.8. But if I pour that freshly made distilled water into a glass that doesn't have a lid on it and then let it set out in the open for a while the pH will drop considerably to around 5.5 - 5.8 because distilled water will absorb carbon dioxide from the air and the caron dioxide will cause the pH of the distilled water to become more acidic.


So, even though one of those unopened/sealed jugs of pure distilled water that you get at the grocery store may have a pH of around 7.0, as soon as you open up that jug and pour it into a glass the pH will start to drop fairly quickly due to the exposure to carbon dioxide in the air.

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canefan17
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emla

So what if the water absorbs carbon dioxide or contaminants from the air?
We're breathing that same air aren't we.

The goal is to remove impurities from the water and distillation does this.

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emla999/Lyme
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Canefan17,

Yes, distilled water will absorb the carbon dioxide from the air that we breath and thus the exposure to the air that we breath will change the pH of distilled water. But freshly made distilled water doesn't contain carbon dioxide and the pH is around 7.0 but as soon as you pour distilled water into an unopened conatiner such as a drinking glass the distilled water will be exposed to the air that we breath and the pH of that distilled water will drop. I have seen my freshly homemade distilled water drop from 6.8 - 5.5 within in a few hours and sometimes quicker than that.


Every time that you open up a plastic jug of distilled water some air and thus some carbon dioxide will get trapped inside that jug and lower the pH of the distlled water. So, if anyone is concerned about drinking acidic distilled water then you would probably want to make sure that your distilled water is not being overly exposed to the air that we breath. Personally, I don't mind drinking distilled water that is either acidic or alkaline because based upon my experience with drinking my homemade distilled water I haven't seen that it makes a bit of difference to my health as to whether my drinking water has a pH of 7.0 or 5.5


And I would also agree that distilled water can help in removing some impurities from our body but I also believe that a person can drink too much water. I have been testing my urine with a refractometer for several months now and this has shed ALOT of light as to why I have been feeling so crappy for all these years. I was drinking waaaaaaay too much water!!!!! By measuring my urine with a refractometer every time that I had to pee I was able to see that my urinary brix/sugar was often low which also means that my urine was of a very low specifc gravity. Low specific gravity of the urine is often associated with either diabetes insipodus or overhydration. Over hydration or chronic water intoxication can cause numerous health problems.


So, based upon my refractometer results, I dramatically lowered my water/fluid intake and increased my carbohydrate/sugar intake somewhat and I feel like a new person. Though I have also changed and added in a few other things as well but if I want to feel super crappy and have extreme chronic fatigue again all that I have to do is to drink more water than my body needs. So, that's proof enough to me to feel as though what I am doing is helping me. And again, the use of refractometer can be very helpful in determining whether or not you are drinking too much water or not enough water.


In my opinion, the use of a refractometer could potentially be helpful to quite a few here on Lymenet. You can get a refractometer on ebay for about $30.00.

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Tammy N.
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Dr. K recommends reverse osmosis, then adding minerals back in. We are planning to go with this approach when we move back into our home.

I don't like to buy water in plastic bottles. In the past I would use the Brita pitcher.... at least it is a non-leaching plastic.

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MichaelTampa
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emla,

Another reason for watered down pee, aside from just plain drinking too much water, is being low in ADH (anti-diuretic hormone). A recently new product developed by Biopure EUROPE is "Homeo K ADH" intended to address this.

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jlp38
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quote:
Originally posted by Tammy N.:
Dr. K recommends reverse osmosis, then adding minerals back in. We are planning to go with this approach when we move back into our home.

I don't like to buy water in plastic bottles. In the past I would use the Brita pitcher.... at least it is a non-leaching plastic.

Do you know which minerals he uses?
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sparkle7
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Thanks for the interesting discussion. Can't you take the minerals separately from the drinking water? I would think that you don't have to actually put the minerals in the water directly - or is there a reason for this?

Another way of changing the acid alkaline balance towards alkaline is using some baking soda. I'm just kind of thinking out loud here. I don't know for sure.

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canefan17
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sparkle,

One could add maple syrup, lemon, honey, molasses and let it sit in sun for a little bit to restructure.

But one could also add the minerals back later (ideally through food)

The idea to use distilled water for me makes sense because #1 I had high levels of arsenic, mercury, lead, etc. I'm tired of being poisoned.

And #2 it will help detox much faster and really take the burden off the kidneys.

A guy I worked for has been drinking distilled water for 40 years. He swears by it and says his mineral levels never faltered because he used celtic salt, syrup, honey, and multi mineral supps to restore minerals.

[ 02-10-2012, 04:44 PM: Message edited by: canefan17 ]

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GiGi
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It is not ideal to force the change of the ph factor. The body in its own wisdom resorts to acidity when needed. Toxic metals, for instance, only go into solution (for further elimination) in an acidic environment. If you force alkalinity, you are stopping the action.

One has to be very careful maneuvering the ph.
I never did the lemon water drinking, but am sure that needs to be thought about.

I know when I am disposing of some remainders of toxins, I am always in an acidic state, probably for some hours. You can test yourself frequently. I have a very alkaline water sample and a very acidic water sample. When I test for either one, I know what my body is doing, especially if it does not ask for one or the other. That is the benefit of some energetic testing - learn and use it. It helps to determine what your body is up to -- what is a prime concern.

Minerals are essential, putting them into the daily drinking water jug is easy, and it assures that you do not get all of them at one time when the body flushes many of them out. This is especially the case with excessive water drinking. The minerals are flushed out of the body before they can be absorbed and put to use.

Absorption of certain minerals is always a problem. Think of KPU.

Michael Tampa is right - there is not much worse than flushing out the nutrients with excessive water intake. The fact that doctors are telling people to drink gallons of water has been frustrating Dr. K. for a long time! I have talked about it on this board many times.

It is best to add the mineral nutrients to a drink that also contains a substance the body has to metabolize first which then gives the body time and cause to absorb. Instead of flushing out the new and few remaining minerals with more and more water. I posted a rehydration drink here several times --- that is the perfect excample. Or go to some of the Dr. K. protocols that includes the Rehydration formula.

Missing minerals- inadequate minerals is one of our big downers. Little or no detoxing happens in that state = a toxic body cannot heal. Period.

Take care.

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emla999/Lyme
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MichaelTampa said:

quote:
emla,

Another reason for watered down pee, aside from just plain drinking too much water, is being low in ADH (anti-diuretic hormone). A recently new product developed by Biopure EUROPE is "Homeo K ADH" intended to address this.

I am glad that you brought up ADH because drinking too much water (overhydration) can potentially lower the body's production of ADH (anti-diuretic hormone).


http://tinyurl.com/84p2qqh


http://tinyurl.com/6s9nu75


Just google overhydration and adh


So, if someone drinks alot of water or eats alot of something that contains alot of water then they could potentially become overly hydrated and thus your body's production of ADH may decrease.


Excess water intake can = lower ADH production



And this is where testing your urine with a refractometer can be helpful in determining whether or not you are overly hydrated (are ingesting to much water). A refractometer can be used to determine the specific gravity of your urine and if your urine has a low specific gravity then this could indicate that you are overhydrated and are ingesting to much water.


Although, there are other things besides drinking too much water that can cause low specific gravity of the urine such as diabetes insipidus, renal failure, diuresis, hypothermia, glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis. But all of those conditions could be ruled out by a competent doctor. And if your urine is of a low specific gravity and you find that by drinking less water increases the specific gravity of your urine and it also makes you feel alot better to drink less water then I would have to say that is possibly a rather good indication that you were drinking too much water.

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sparkle7
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Really interesting. I heard a doctor from the military say that most people are not hydrated enough... I think it depends on the climate. When it's 110 degrees - you really have to drink alot of water.

I agree with GiGi about the body seeking it's own balance. I don't think it's a good idea to force things either way unless there's a particular reason. Even Dr. Simoncini, the doctor who has cured cancer with baking soda, says that there's no sense in trying to make the body alkaline with alkaline water.

It difficult to find the "perfect" water. Even if you do drink distilled water - there are still toxins in the air & in food. Our food is being watered with water from who knows where...

I'm sure it doesn't hurt to drink distilled water if you add extra minerals. I don't care for the plastic bottles. Might be good if you make it yourself...? You could move to Iceland. The water there was quite good.

We have to think of detox as a lifetime pursuit. Stress will kill you, too. That's something I haven't been able to cut back on as much as I would like.

I don't mean to sound sarcastic... I think about all of this stuff, too.

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emla999/Lyme
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Some interesting articles about the possible negative health effects of drinking too much water (and other fluids since, milk, fruit juices, vegetable juice, coffee, tea, beer and etc. all contain water).


http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=378f85de-27de-4046-815e-293b772666e5


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110712190822.htm


http://www.health24.com/dietnfood/Water_centre/15-167-172,26979.asp

.

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