LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Iceman may have had Lyme

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Iceman may have had Lyme
sunman
Member
Member # 23739

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sunman     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57387617/iceman-mummy-may-hold-earliest-evidence-of-lyme-disease/
Posts: 18 | From Maryland | Registered: Dec 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Is CBS just now picking up on this??

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95350 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lymenow
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 36175

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lymenow     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Blood tests today are 50/50 at best, yet they can find it in man that just barely missed hunting woolly mammoths. hmmm.

It's really annoying, Lyme has made me skeptical of everybody.

Posts: 109 | From PA | Registered: Feb 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ChuckG
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 19093

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ChuckG     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
"Our data point to the earliest documented case of a B. burgdorferi infection in mankind. To our knowledge, no other case report about borreliosis [Lyme disease] is available for ancient or historic specimens," Zink and colleagues write in an article published on Tuesday (Feb. 28) in the journal Nature Communications.
They weren't looking for it in the blood.

quote:
To sequence the Iceman's genome, researchers took a sample from his hip bone. In it, they looked for not only human DNA -- the chemical code that makes up genes -- but also for that of other organisms. While they found evidence of other microbes, the Lyme disease bacterium, called Borrelia burgdorferi, was the only one known to cause disease, said Albert Zink, a study researcher and head of the European Institute for Mummies and the Iceman at the European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano (EURAC) in Italy.

Posts: 426 | From Berkeley, CA | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
paulieinct
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 17514

Icon 1 posted      Profile for paulieinct     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
To find Bb in the one cadaver from that era out of millions that we have not been able to study means that Bb was likely a common affliction at that time.

Bb infection likely caused his heart disease. Remember this man ate a 100% organic diet, the kind of diet modern humans are told to emulate to achieve optimum health. No trans fats, no HFCS, no diet pepsi. Just grains, nuts, berries and a chunk of meat now and then. He presumably had plenty of exercise too. No couches back then and no couch potatoes either.

Bb also likely caused his arthritis. The scientists have speculated that his numerous "tattoos" were probably attempts at acupuncture-like pain-relief.

This is a VERY important discovery which I predict will convince some of the nay-sayers of the devastating health consequences of unchecked borrelia infection in even the healthiest of individuals.

--------------------
Sick since at least age 6, now 67. Decades of misdiagnosis. Numerous arthritic, neuro, psych, vision, cardiac symptoms. Been treating for 7 years, incl 8 mos on IV. Bart was missed so now treating that.

Posts: 765 | From nw ct | Registered: Sep 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Good info, Chuck.. thanks!

Totally agree, paulie! Probably a very common ailment.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95350 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Eleven PHOTOS included with article. Reconstruction model. We get to see what kind of body he had, his face, so to speak.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/20/health/otzi-tyrolean-iceman-mummy-new-study/index.html

Weapons reveal how this 5,300-year-old ice mummy lived -- and died

By Ashley Strickland - CNN - June 20, 2018

These new findings add to the wealth of knowledge we've gained about this mysterious figure. Here's what else we know about the Iceman and how he was killed. . . .

. . . [46 years at time of his death] . . .

. . . But the motive for his killing is unclear, . . .

. . . Since 1998, Otzi and his artifacts have been on display at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy. He was nicknamed Otzi because he was found in the Otztal Alps of South Tyrol.

His clothing, made from leather, hide, braided grass and animal sinews, provides a unique window into the past because other clothing from that time has never been recovered.

His hide coat, leggings, loincloth, belt, fur shoes and bearskin cap would have kept him warm in the cold, wet climate. . . .

. . . he was lactose-intolerant. . . .

. . . Otzi had a high risk of cardiovascular disease and traces of Borrelia, tick-borne bacteria that cause Lyme disease, in his genome.

Bacteria in his stomach could have led to stomach ulcers. He had intestinal whipworms. . . .

. . . His last meal, most likely an hour before his death, included grain and ibex and deer meat. . . . [Ibex is a species of wild goat]
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Charlie Fitzgerald
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 50657

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charlie Fitzgerald     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by sunman:
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57387617/iceman-mummy-may-hold-earliest-evidence-of-lyme-disease/

That's great and all, but how similar is that strain in the caveman to the strain that was brought over here by a German scientist in Project Paperclip.

And was that strain aggressive as the new modern day borrelia? We all know how some borrelia bacteria have different characteristics than others, some go to your brain cause neuro issues, while others go to your joints, and others just stay dormant non-aggressive.

Interesting fact here... Once upon a time, a scientist bred a European honeybee with African bee. Scientists wanted to create a bee that will produce more honey, but unfortunately they created less effective and highly aggressive species, aka the "Killer Bee." This killer bee escaped their lab and became an invasive species in North America, Mexico, Central Mexico.

Point is, don't be fooled by this propaganda the media puts out, hinting that borrelia has been here all this time. Chances are this a completely different strain. Lyme Disease was not heard of until the 80s in Lyme Conneticut, why is that?

Use your head!!!

Scientists have manipulating organisms in the last 40 years, modifying them, some of you know them to be GMOs, as well as interbreeding causing a hybridized wheat, which now a huge percentage of the population can't tolerate. Aka Celiac Disease, aka gluten intolerance.

So the question is, was borrelia genetically modified, maybe interbred with other borrelia bacteria to make it more aggressive. All this is very much possible, which huge percentage of the population doesn't understand/comprehend.

Posts: 108 | From Germany | Registered: Jul 2017  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ctone
Member
Member # 38779

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ctone     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Charlie Fitzgerald:
quote:
Originally posted by sunman:
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57387617/iceman-mummy-may-hold-earliest-evidence-of-lyme-disease/

That's great and all, but how similar is that strain in the caveman to the strain that was brought over here by a German scientist in Project Paperclip.

And was that strain aggressive as the new modern day borrelia? We all know how some borrelia bacteria have different characteristics than others, some go to your brain cause neuro issues, while others go to your joints, and others just stay dormant non-aggressive.

Interesting fact here... Once upon a time, a scientist bred a European honeybee with African bee. Scientists wanted to create a bee that will produce more honey, but unfortunately they created less effective and highly aggressive species, aka the "Killer Bee." This killer bee escaped their lab and became an invasive species in North America, Mexico, Central Mexico.

Point is, don't be fooled by this propaganda the media puts out, hinting that borrelia has been here all this time. Chances are this a completely different strain. Lyme Disease was not heard of until the 80s in Lyme Conneticut, why is that?

Use your head!!!

Scientists have manipulating organisms in the last 40 years, modifying them, some of you know them to be GMOs, as well as interbreeding causing a hybridized wheat, which now a huge percentage of the population can't tolerate. Aka Celiac Disease, aka gluten intolerance.

So the question is, was borrelia genetically modified, maybe interbred with other borrelia bacteria to make it more aggressive. All this is very much possible, which huge percentage of the population doesn't understand/comprehend.

Agreed with your assessment of the ice-man nonsense, but the best explanation for what is causing wheat intolerance, among a lot of other problems, is the saturating of the wheat crops, especially in Canada and the USA, with glyphosate just prior to harvesting, and that's non gmo wheat crops, so in this case, the non-gmo label isn't going to be of much use.

A couple of links for some info on glyphosates:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmAsTrsUjBc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snNRfAfSeUk

The other news is that farmers are using glyphosates on dozens of different crops, mainly conventional, but it's also showing up at extremely high levels, for some unexplained reason (maybe "organic" labeling fraud) in supposedly organic crops, and once again, the GMO free label has little bearing on the levels of glyphosate. Glyphosates, in addition to the other damage that it causes in bodies, is metabolized into oxalates,
which, relevant to those with lyme, causes many symptoms similar to lyme symptoms, notably, interstitial cystitis, joint muscle and tendon dysfunction and pain, brain fog....etc...

To find out just how bad the situation is, please read the following kindle book......

https://www.amazon.com/POISON-FOODS-NORTH-AMERICA-navigating-ebook/dp/B06XS4Y6H2

Posts: 40 | From USA | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
One thing is certain: many too many pathogens are becoming too virulent today.

Take a look at:
- dengue (that was inoffensive not too long ago, then started killing recently),

- Zika (very inoffensive in the past).

Research shows that OLD Zika strains in Africa were MUCH MORE virulent that today's version in South America (like killing nerve cells in much more virulent ways).

Why now is Zika causing so many problems?

- mold: is another problem. We grew, evolved, with mold. Why now mold became such a problem?

- Same as candida: no single living being in the planet is free from candida: why has candida become such a huge problem today?

Even if it is true that the genetic engineered Borrelia strain must be stronger and more virulent that Oetzi's Borrelia, why OTHER pathogens area also more virulent today than previous versions?

In my opinion, there are two things to look at:

- a certain weakening of the immune system causing all these developments in chronic diseases (and acute) from innocent pathogens (that were not supposed to cause serious illnesses...)

... AND some genetic engineering, modifying strains. But it is not only lyme that is becoming such a burden. Epstein Barr Viruses, herpes and a bunch of other pathogens.

It's not only the pathogens that are the problem, but ALSO the human body / Immune system.

Posts: 6196 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BobG
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 39642

Icon 7 posted      Profile for BobG     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The CDC was useless for him too. [Razz]

[ 06-24-2018, 08:58 AM: Message edited by: BobG ]

Posts: 360 | From Massachusetts | Registered: Dec 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.