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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Meat Allergy Caused by Tick Bites; The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

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Author Topic: Meat Allergy Caused by Tick Bites; The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Sammi
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My friend who lives in Utah heard on the local news that meat allergies have been linked to tick bites. I did a search and came up with the article below.

I find this very interesting. I believe many people who have Lyme have different food allergies. I found out recently through allergy testing that I react significantly to beef and pork. Since I don't eat them, it is not a problem.

I hope this may help others.

For some reason, I am unable to post the link to the article and/or the article itself.

If you are interested, Google The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The title of the article is "The relevance of tick bites to the production of IgE antibodies to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose."

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Lymetoo
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http://www2.timesdispatch.com/lifestyles/2011/jul/05/tdmain01-tick-bites-appear-to-trigger-allergy-to-r-ar-1151864/

Interesting! [Cool]

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Sammi
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Lymetoo, do you know why I cannot post the link to the journal or post the article itself?
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Lymetoo
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No. Unless the site is not allowing it.. the site where the study was posted. I just found the first article and posted it.

I'll go back and see if I can find the journal article.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Lymetoo
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085643/

Is this it?

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Sammi
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Weird, it looks like the article but it is not from the original Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The content looks the same, so that is what matters.

Thanks!!

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Lymetoo
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Now, how do they know for sure that this person wasn't already allergic to red meat?

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Sammi
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In the journal article, it says:

"In 2009, we reported a novel form of delayed anaphylaxis to red meat that is related to serum IgE antibodies to the oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal).

Most of these patients had tolerated meat for many years previously. The implication is that some exposure in adult life had stimulated the production of these IgE antibodies."

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jklynd
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Sudden onset meat allergies(including pork) related to tick bites:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/10/19/AR2009101902874.html

From Washington Post (2009) Very interesting article,and shows that some researchers are "connecting-the-dots"......

Joe

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marypart
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I have a co-worker whose son-in-law has this. He lives in Virginia. It was sudden onset after a tick-bite and the doctor's confirmed it. He can't eat red meat or pork anymore.

--------------------
Son, 26, Dx Lyme 4/10, Babs 8/10
Had serious arthritis, all gone.
Currently on Valtrex
Daughter, 26,bullseye 7/11
arthritis in knees, cured and off all meds. .
Self:Lyme, bart, sxs gone, no longer treating.

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Sammi
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marypart, that is something. I guess it is likely that my allergy to them are from the tick bite. Thankfully, since I don't eat beef or pork it is not a problem.
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WPinVA
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Very interesting. I wonder if it goes beyond red meat. Perhaps this is linked to the epidemic of childhood allergies.
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WPinVA
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This is fascinating. The doctors have no clue why there is this sudden epidemic of childhood allergies. Wouldn't it be something if it's all linked to tick bites.
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AuntyLynn
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The sudden epidemic of childhood allergies is much more likely linked to Genetically Modified Soybeans!

Doctors in the UK noted a sudden 50% increase in childhood allergies within the first two years that the European Union allowed Monsanto's Round-Up Ready soy products into their food supply.

Its sale was eventually banned by the European Union - so they are feeding it to US citizens instead.

Got soybean oil? (Salad Dressing? Mayonnaise?), Bread, pancake mixes or other prepared food (w/soy flour? soy protein, or "hydrolyzed vegetable protein?"), anything with soy lecithin? (chocolate), then you're eating GMOs -and Uncle Sam says you don't need to worry about it, so he won't force manufacturers to label it!

California will have a mandatory GMO labeling law on the ballot in November.

Otherwise, the policy is "let the buyer beware."

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Keebler
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-
Porphryia can also make eating red meat an experience in torture.

With good porphyria management, though, I find I enjoy and do very well with the nourishment from grass-fed, free range and organically raised cattle or lamb if it's in small quantities or shredded in a stew or soup.

But, there were years where I could not tolerate any red meat (but that was before I learned about organic options and before untreated lyme had been identified. Also did not know then that I had porphyria).

-------------------------------

http://ciin.org/mcs.html

About MCS (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities)

. . . Disorders of Porphyrinopathy . . .

==============================

http://planetthrive.com/2010/04/hpukpu-protocol-for-lyme-and-autism/

HPU / KPU Protocol - Planet Thrive

==============================

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/91842?#000000

Topic: what type of M.D. tests for PORPHYRIA

Many good links here
-

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nefferdun
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That is interesting but red meat is not good for anyone so there is only gain when your body rejects it before your mind figures it out.

--------------------
old joke: idiopathic means the patient is pathological and the the doctor is an idiot

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desertwind
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I too tested postive for beef allergy and found this study a couple of months ago.

Since I have a bovine pericardium patch in the back of my head/dura I am even more concerned. I am part cow....

I have consulted with numerous allergiest about this and all I get is the blank "duh" look...

I still eat meat every so often and nothing noticable happens, but since mine is an IgG it could be a delayed response that I do not attribute to the meat.

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AuntyLynn
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"...but red meat is not good for anyone so there is only gain when your body rejects it..."


I simply cringe whenever someone makes a broad, and completely uninformed statement like this one above.

So Nefferdun - please tell me... what did paleolithic homo sapiens live and thrive on, if not the flesh of the animals they followed and hunted?

Do you know that our genetic ancestors never grew or tasted grain until thousands of years after the advent of homo erectus?

Or that the Ancient Egyptians were among the first groups to develop agriculture and "settle down" on the land ... instead of roaming around following animal herds?

Ever hear of the Paleo diet?

In fact, the Romans referred to the Egyptians as the "bread eaters" (as this was what fueled their armies!)... and modern archeologists have found mummies whose bodies reveal that Egyptians suffered widely from atherosclerosis and heart disease. This makes perfect sense, given what we now know about simple carbohydrates, insulin resistence and pancreatic function!

Now I have no doubt that some people feel better when they avoid meat. (Digestive insufficiencies may be a big part of this fact.)

I also agree with Keebler's observations above, that given our horrendous animal husbandry practices in this country, eating the standard fare found in most grocery stores poses its own set of problems ... as compared to GRASS FED or "naturally raised" beef, pork, and chicken.

However, not ONE cell in our bodies can replicate without protein! In fact, just four essential amino acids comprise the building blocks of our entire genetic code!

So when folks project their own "food prejudices" upon others, and make blanket statements to the effect that the very foods that have supported human life on this planet, are suddenly to be avoided - I am compelled to cite some historical and scientific evidence.

In a perfect world, chicken feathers and other slaughterhouse waste would not be "recycled" to feed beef cattle. (This unethical practice was proven to have spawned the "Mad Cow" epidemic!)

In a perfect world, all dairy cows would be pastured, and their natural whole raw milk carefully monitored and refrigerated, so that its essential nutrients are delivered to consumers in all its perfect nutritional glory.

In a perfect world, chickens would not be crammed shoulder to shoulder into filthy barns, where they are never allowed a ray of sunshine, and are dosed with antibiotic-laden feed.

Yes, I will grant that our farming practices leave MUCH to be desired - both hygienically and ETHICALLY - but this is not to say that there ARE alternative farmers who are trying to "do the right thing" ... and if more people would patronize their efforts, the "marketplace" would be forced to meet our demands.

But to promote vegetarianism as the only "healthy" dietary option, is simply erroneous.

And when I see a post like one I saw last night on these boards, where a very ill woman expresses that she barely eats at all because "others here" have expressed the opinion that ...
"Lyme patients" should not eat meat or drink milk ... I am shocked at the depth of this disseminated ignorance, that could potentially add MALNUTRITION to the litany of ills that most here are already suffering!

SPECIFIC allergies notwithstanding ...

Many on these boards are simply too ill to be able to weigh the facts logically for themselves.

As as a lifelong student of nutrition, both formally and informally, I am compelled to offer this opposing view.

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