LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » The Microscopy Thread (Page 5)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 21 pages: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  ...  19  20  21   
Author Topic: The Microscopy Thread
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This could be it!

B. henselae
 -


More bart.
 -

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
 -

It says that arrows are pointing to the coccobacilli. The Fry photos I have seen do show actual arrows, but this photo has none, only boxes with numbers with a line attached to the organism (except on #3). I know I'm being technical, but Fry normally has a couple pictures, one of which does normally have actual "arrows."

Could there have been another pic with these results that could be posted that would give us more info? Is the description actually referring to THIS pic? I know I'm being technical....since it does look like coccobacilli.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Actually, to the left of the square box surrounding the number IS a pointer (arrow) & it is very faint. I guess they consider that the "arrow" or pointer to the bacteria.


All of the arrows seem to be properly aligned to the dots (bart coccobacilli) on the peripheral of the rbc extracelluarly, except for #3 which I think is just not aligned properly.


You can right click the image & save as, then zoom in to see it better.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I made my first Giemsa stain! The bottle of stain came from a local supplier thru Amazon, so it came much quicker than I expected it to.

I know I should know this, but, do Bart-like organisms stain with Giemsa? Or, is it only parasites with a nucleus?

My brain is not working well enough right now to try find the answer myself.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Warthin-Starry staining is used to identify it histologicaly or another type of SILVER stain.
Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
S13, what do you use for bacteria or bart-like organisms?
Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
S13, what I meant was what stain do you use for bacteria or bart-like organisms.

Has anyone seen these new videos yet? They are pretty good for what appears to be a home setup. The proposed cyst video has over 60 views already!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyElJm2qFUA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIcK6Nd7v50

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
S13
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 42830

Icon 1 posted      Profile for S13     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For bacteria you can use the giemsa stain yes. Though if you want more differentiation you would need a Gram stain (so you know if its gram negative or gram positive bacteria).

For BLO i dont know. Nobody knows, since we dont know what BLO is. Is it a bacteria? Does it even exists? Perhaps its just a collection of other known bacteria?

Anyway, take a look at some of the posts over in this blog:
http://lymemd.blogspot.nl/
He has posted several examples of giemsa smears showing babs and what he thinks is bart or BLO. Though even he regards some of the bacteria just as "mystery bugs".

Posts: 374 | From The Netherlands | Registered: Nov 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The last video sure looks like Borrelia & fits the 3 criteria I mentioned previously.


I don't think Giemsa is reliable for many Bartonella species, as most DO NOT stain well. That is why when you see many of these studies they use Warthin-Starry staining, Steiner silver stain, or other type of SILVER stains, which are BEST used for Bartonella.


I think I read somewhere that Fry Labs has used a MODIFIED Giemsa stain with success, but they did not mention any details as to the exact modification process.


One could also culture Bart on chocolate blood agar or soy agar, but it takes DAYS (9-40) for cultures to appear.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Dr. Willy Burgdorfer crushed ticks & viewed them under a microscope.
 -


As posted before, this guy has done the same thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBKXCXo2wB8


Are you guys willing to try this? Now I can't wait to find the next tick.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I hate the nasty, filthy creatures! Who knows what each one may be carrying. There's no way I am going to be tampering with a tick. They go down the toilet unless they have been attached. Though, I have been known to burn and torture them.
Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Ok, I tried posting a picture from my Google account (then deleted it) and now I know it will work.

To those on the forum that are more computer savvy than me, will this be a potential security hazard for my Google account or my identity?

I love sharing about my microscopy, but I can't afford to invite a breach into my personal info.

The main thing I'm concerned about is the URL address of the picture being visible to the whole world, but it didn't appear like any personal info was in the URL, and even if it did link my profile, I don't really have any personal info visible on the profile (just in the account).

So, I feel pretty safe, but would like some input.

Thanks

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You can email it to me & I can place it on photobucket, or you can make your own photobucket account.
Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Lymedin, why do you use photobucket instead of your google account?

Are you saying there is a security threat with posting from one's google account?

The fewer accounts that I open the better!

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I would not give out my main email account to the public no matter what I was doing.


Also, you can keep your hobbies & interests private from your friends & families if that is what you desire also.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
At 25:38 Dr. Alan MacDonald presents pictures of Alzheimer's Diseased dead brain tissue that he was able to culture aggressive adult spirochetes from.


Notice how in the brain tissue they appear squiggly & worm like, just like we see in our blood. Whilst the cultured versions appear more aggressive & textbook style types.


https://youtu.be/8TQj2137PGk?t=1538


BEAUTIFUL!!!

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
S13, what I meant was what stain do you use for bacteria or bart-like organisms.

Has anyone seen these new videos yet? They are pretty good for what appears to be a home setup. The proposed cyst video has over 60 views already!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyElJm2qFUA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIcK6Nd7v50

Wow-- these are amazing videos. Luckily for her, her live blood doesn't look too bad in terms of spirochete infestation-- but classic spirochetes are clearly visible and actively trying to suck the life out of her red blood cells! I wish I still had my youtube channel so that I could comment and give her a thumbs up and heap praise on her for her videography work.. If anyone here has a youtube channel, please give her our congratulations and praise. Thanks for sharing these. All people out there doing Lyme videography deserve academy awards.
Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Dr. Willy Burgdorfer crushed ticks & viewed them under a microscope.
 -


As posted before, this guy has done the same thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBKXCXo2wB8


Are you guys willing to try this? Now I can't wait to find the next tick.

This is a great vid, too lymed2010... In this specific video of the crushed tick's blood, it looks like there are more borrelia cysts than actual live spirochetes( I only saw a couple of live spirochetes) which is a useful piece of scientific info. I was hoping to see filaria also, but I don't know exactly what they look like. I also think that youtube may be suppressing the view count on these types of videos--- if you watch that video 5 times, the view count stays static... LOL...
Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi Wakeup, filtered water was added to the crushed ticks & I think water forces them into cysts & blebs as they prepare for adverse conditions. I think more are inclined to the relative quick cyst conversion, as opposed to the time consuming SoP formation & hence more cysts are seen.


The water level concentrations are not the same for every point of the mixture & at one point it balances out as tick cells lyse & change the overall balance, so a few spiros might never encounter high enough water concentrations to induce morphological change & as a result appear atypical.


What is surprising is that they are atypical in a tick as well, just like we see in our blood & not the text-book style aggressors (for at least this case).

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aneg
Member
Member # 46674

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Aneg     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hello. I wanted to post that I will start doing some research on my own too and do what I can to contribute.

I have a Nikon laboratory microscope. I work as a chemist but this microscope is MINE. I am ordering some slides and I am also going to order some gram staining kits and other kits too.

I am missing my oil immersion lens [Frown] .

However I will need to get one of those.

I find some of these videos fascinating. I work with two microbiologist but one of the guys I work with is very intelligent.

He worked in Cali producing Botulinum Toxin from C. Botulinum. I have worked in microbiology for two years prior to becoming a chemist however there is still a great deal to learn.

My background: I spent two years working in food and pharmaceutical microbiology and going on 3 years as a chemist with 1 year in food chemistry and 2 years in pharmaceuticals. Was completing biochemistry degree but all this hit me and I was too ill to finish.

I am still making an attempt but to be honest, almost everything you need to know is available online and can be self learned.

I hope I can be of some help as I was just diagnosed yesterday and having this for ~4 years.

Talk soon, ANeg

--------------------
Life is short, live it without regrets.

Posts: 33 | From DFW | Registered: Sep 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aneg
Member
Member # 46674

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Aneg     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hello. I am more of a chemist than anything and my knowledge set is not strongest in microscopy however I noticed something strange with my blood stains when they dry.

Now I noticed when this was fresh last night there were what looked like thousands of tiny proteins that I could see and some still seem to be moving among the smear.

There is an artifact in the photos that looks long and rod shaped, that is from the camera and I was unable to get that off. Not sure what it is.

However I have no idea what the network looking strings are. I was thinking they could be potentially the plasma crystallising while drying. What are your thoughts.

This is at 1000X. Sorry for poor lighting, the camera was not the best.

 -

 -

--------------------
Life is short, live it without regrets.

Posts: 33 | From DFW | Registered: Sep 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Whoa, ANeg, you got an oil lens pretty quickly!

Those "network-looking strings" may be fibrin spicules.

Do you think the "proteins" you are seeing could be lysozomes (they would be the same tiny particles you see flowing around in the WBCs, but can also be seen bouncing around in the plasma from brownian motion)? What I notice is that they are the most abundant in the plasma when first viewing the slide, but diminish as the sample deteriorates.

Thanks for your contribution! I don't know if you have any other hobbies, but, be forewarned, microscopy may become hobby #1 for you now, LOL!

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
 -

[ 10-09-2015, 11:02 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Aneg
Member
Member # 46674

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Aneg     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
They could be. I borrowed the lens from the microlab at work. I am going to order a Nikon brand as for this one was Olympus. not really a big deal but my microscope is a Nikon. Old school alphaphot YS but it works well and I can see things that I could not ever be able to using college microscope.

I do enjoy it, I cannot look too long under the scope or I will get dizzy. I was looking at getting a camera but I have yet to find anything good. Any ideas?

--------------------
Life is short, live it without regrets.

Posts: 33 | From DFW | Registered: Sep 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The pic I posted above is from my first Giemsa-stained slide. It shows a Basophil among erythrocytes.

I plan on posting various pics of my Giemsa stain.

Aneg, a Nikon is a nice scope to have. As for a good camera, I use an old Canon A540 and that works pretty well just shooting through the eyepiece. But, you cannot do time-lapse with that; I hope to get an eyepiece camera sometime for that purpose. I'll probably get an Amscope eyepiece camera unless I find a better one for a better deal.

The problem I'm hearing with time-lapse is that between shots the scope can get out of focus. S13 has overcome that problem, and I wish I knew more about how he did it.

If you get a chance S13, do share the details of how you accomplished that (like what program you used and how you integrated it practically). Hopefully it's not too challenging for those like me to understand.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
S13
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 42830

Icon 1 posted      Profile for S13     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yes the camera will get out of focus with timelapse recording. I still think it has to do with the heating from the light bulb that slowly warps the frame of the microscope. So the solution i use is to switch off the bulb between pictures. This works really well.

I do use a complicated solution, but thats just because i used to be an electronics engineer before lyme and i had some old projects laying
around that i could use.

Basically i use a standard microscope camera with PC software. Ive written a small software program that commands the camera PC software to take a picture with a programmable interval. It also communicates with an FPGA board via USB. By toggling a relay on the FPGA board it can enable and disable the microscope light bulb.

So every 2 minutes or so, the program will enable the light, wait a couple of seconds, command the camera software to take a picture, wait another couple of seconds, and disable the light.

So you end up with hundreds of pictures that can be converted to a video by a video editing tool (i use powerdirector). And then you get something like this for example:
https://youtu.be/l4t7UKi4ma8
(24h candida growing time lapse)

Time lapses can be very fun to see things grow [Smile]

Posts: 374 | From The Netherlands | Registered: Nov 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Can someone take a look at this and tell me what I am seeing?
I followed it for over an hour.
It appears to be an RBC (portion of) with a spirochete or some other mechanism providing motility, as the cell matter traveled around to some degree.
It's not easy to see in the video, but when viewing through the microscope, you could see the thin portion protruding from the cell matter moving and whipping around.
HERE IS THE VIDEO (filmed on my cell phone)
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=7wOwSebreVc

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hey dude,

Welcome to the forum, and to this thread!

It looks like your link is a dud. It appears as though you didn't "publish" your video when you were done uploading it.

Try again, and we may be able to give you some possibilities of what you may be seeing.

Care to share some of your story??

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It says it is published and public.

Can you still not see it?

I've actually been diagnosed with MS, but was also reactive on a few bands on western blot IgM and IgG.
So I've been using my microscope to do some of my own stuff, out of curiosity. I have some formal training in this kind of stuff, but it's been so long, and I am not a professional.

The video is from my cell phone, as it was the only way to capture it at the time.

This video is also roughly two hours after I started viewing it, so the motility is much lower, likely due to the blood drying.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
S13
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 42830

Icon 1 posted      Profile for S13     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You need to provide us the youtube "share" link, not the "edit" link.

Anyway, this should fix it: https://youtu.be/7wOwSebreVc

tbh i cant make much of this video. Perhaps use a steady digital camera with some optical zoom?

Posts: 374 | From The Netherlands | Registered: Nov 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
There it is! Thanks S13. Before my last post I even searched youtube for the last 10-15 characters of the link dude gave us, and still couldn't find it.

Yeah, I couldn't make anything out of the video either. I would 2nd S13's suggestions.

A smaller digital camera works great if you hold it up to the eyepiece. A smaller camera works better than a larger one. My Canon A540 works great, whereas my Canon SX160is is very unsuitable even though it is a newer and better version (the diameter of the lens is too wide to practically hold against the eyepiece since the 160 has a wide angle lens).

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yea, unfortunately this was 2 hours after I had started viewing it. It's the hemolyzed RBC right below the arrow. The only one that is not a full RBC.

It's hard to see, but I did follow it and had others look and confirm that I wasn't just seeing things.

The small portion extending out of the RBC on the right side was moving, and providing motility. I'll see if I have any other videos.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://youtu.be/PWpnqzIYuXQ

I uploaded another video I had pointing at what I was looking at.

Unfortunately, you have to look closely to see it moving. The portion extending out of it WAS moving, and providing motility. I had numerous other people also view it to tell me what they saw.

It moved through a small portion of the slide before the blood had started to dry, which is why it is not moving around like it was. However, the RBC was being moved, as you could see that small portion wiggling/flicking.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I'm sorry, dude, but I couldn't see any more than with the first video. They make cradles that you can attach your phone to a microscope with if you don't have access to a point and shoot camera. It will keep your phone still and "may" help your phone get a better capture.

But, even with a point and shoot camera, you may still have similar trouble keeping it steady. Then again, there are adapters for that, too.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here are some adapters:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=phone+microscope+adapters

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FIW4CTK?keywords=universal%20microscope%20camera%20adapters&qid=1444146229&ref_=sr_1_8&sr=8-8

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Will post more in future, for now just a quick answer to a question.

I have found that running a ceiling fan & keeping room temp constant AFTER bulb has been on a while, to help drastically with focus creep issue. I would imagine that a dedicated fan properly placed should diffuse the heat. The whole trick is to keep a constant temp, no matter what that temp is. Expansion & contraction due from the heat is what causes the focus creep.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
 -

 -

Best photos I could get for the moment. I have a video uploading currently if anyone wants to look.
It appeared to be a spirochete to me, linking to RBC's. The free RBC that is crenated was actually pulled closer, across the open plain of plasma, so it is about twice as close as it started.

What do you guys think? Best photo I can get currently. I enlarged the area in the first photo to get a closer look.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjs5cltElOI&feature=youtu.be

4:30 is a good point to see what I am talking about. Focusing on it and getting it to be clear in the video is hard right now.

[ 10-10-2015, 02:44 PM: Message edited by: thatdudefromkansas ]

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It is really hard to tell what that is. Since there are string like objects in human blood, I would disregard anything that does not fit the criteria I mention in the past (with bulbs on both tips...etc).


There will be spiros without bulbous tips, but in order to avoid false identification it is best to disregard anything without those criteria. You have actually posted a beautiful video from another Youtuber that met the criteria.


To make instant improvements to your video & image, I would use any DAYLIGHT 5000K CFL bulb, such as the Philips CFL with TuffGuard Protection that I showed you video of.

Here is another example of a CFL that you can use:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-60W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-T2-Spiral-CFL-Light-Bulb-E-6-Pack-414045/205390612

Basically, place the bulb in a standard lamp & then directly under your condenser & shift the bulb with your hand until you witness best lighting & shading via the binocular port. Keep in mind the heat will cause more focus creep though & the LED daylight bulbs will produce less heat but can be damaging to your eyes. So if you use an LED bulb, then it is best to only use your camera to view the images & not damage your eyes with prolonged LED exposure.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Will do. Unfortunately, the other one I did see would more closely match that criteria.
Another one protruding out of an RBC, with a bulbous end and very clearly moving.

I need to get a shorter lens on my camera. It'll clear it up more.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here are some pics from my first Giemsa stain:


1. Two possible Bart-like organisms that took up the stain:

 -

2. A zoomed in pic of the same organisms:

 -

3. Another possible Bart-like organism:

 -

4. A zoomed in pic of the same organism:

 -

5. 3 WBCs and a possible kete:

 -

6. A possible kete among RBCs and a few platelets:

 -

7. A zoomed in pic of the same organism:

 -


If the above organism is a kete, it's noteworthy that it did not take up the Giemsa stain.

[ 10-11-2015, 03:37 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Have I ever told you guys how HAPPY microscopy makes me?

This HAPPY:


 -


It's too bad a smiley-faced-shaped WBC is not the sign of a happy immune system!!

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hey that last pic looks like me.


I feel the same way about microscopy. Rather than being in the dark, it gives us power.


"6. A possible kete among RBCs and a few platelets:"
That one looks like it could be a spiro & undergoing blebbing.


TNT, I am surprised you are not seeing as many in your blood as I am in mine, which might be a good thing actually. I find mine everywhere & the only thing that has been able to reduce them was Cowden Protocol so far, but it has wore off.


As I said before the only other thing that MUST have cleared my blood of spiros, but sent them to all my joints, organs & nerves, was IV Rocephin. Since I could not find any spiros in my blood at the tail end of that drug.


FYI, check my other post out about Dr. Eva Sapi's work on Stevia & Bee Venom, which both showed anti-Borrelia activity. CBD oil was also shown to be effective on ALL FORMS of bb.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
TNT, I am surprised you are not seeing as many in your blood as I am in mine, which might be a good thing actually.

That may be a good thing, unless they are in L-form, as I am suspecting. The last wet mount that I did about a week ago showed a higher load of what I have been suspecting are L-forms (the forms I pointed out in a couple of my videos).


(As for that last pic resembling you), I imagined you with bigger ears, lol!

Ha Ha, I'm just kidding!


I have recently been giving Bee Venom treatment a little more consideration. It has done wonderful things for some people.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
As I said before the only other thing that MUST have cleared my blood of spiros, but sent them to all my joints, organs & nerves, was IV Rocephin. Since I could not find any spiros in my blood at the tail end of that drug.

As I pointed out in a previous post, Penicillins and Cephalosporins CAUSE cell-wall deficient bacterial forms!!!!!

This could be why you saw no ketes in your blood. It could be the ketes sought safe haven in your joints and nerves, OR, it could be that the Rocephin caused them to convert to L-forms and the L-forms caused the damage at these places. Cell-wall deficient forms cause the most damage, and are the hardest to eradicate! Thus, when you discontinued the Rocephin, you eventually got much worse than you previously were. Because, not only did the ketes come out to play once you discontinued the Rocephin, you now had l-form ketes to deal with.

I personally feel that LLMDs should not treat with Cephalosporins or Penicillins UNLESS concurrent treatment with a macrolide or tetracycline is given!

[ 10-13-2015, 01:39 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I feel the same way & I thought to myself what type of backward thinking is this.


It is useless to treat mid to late stage without a cyst buster, simply moronic & I have had that stance since the first month of starting treatment.

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I feel the same way & I thought to myself what type of backward thinking is this.


It is useless to treat mid to late stage without a cyst buster, simply moronic & I have had that stance since the first month of starting treatment.

Even if one does treatment with a penicillin or cephalosporin AND a cyst-buster, you will STILL CAUSE CONVERSION TO L-FORMS and perhaps be worse off.

That is why it is important to hit all three forms at the same time for effective treatment.

Though, I am afraid of cyst-busters because I have had horrible reactions with them. Did they cause conversion to L-forms? Is that one reason (among others) for why I had bad experiences with them? Quite possibly.

I find it interesting that there is so much hype about the overuse of antibiotics causing antibiotic-resistant super-bugs and so little research into the fact that most bugs are pleo-morphic.

This really could be a huge component of why the drugs aren't working as well anymore. I mean, when someone has strep throat and the normal course of Amoxicillin doesn't clear it up, the patient is then given Azithromycin. That clears it up.

ABX-resistance?

That's what they say (and it probably is).

Pleomorphism?

Very possibly, too, in many cases.


It's interesting that the drug of choice for eliminating persister cells is Daptomycin. If you look Daptomycin up you'll find that it is one of the most effective drugs against L-form bacteria. It ruptures the cell MEMBRANE of cell-wall-deficient bacteria.

So, are the real persister cells (and the reason many don't get well with ABX treatment even with anti-cyst drugs) L-form and not cysts?

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://youtu.be/Nq92hfXHlgI


I have a view more vids.

This is dark field, but filmed with my DSLR instead of microscope cam.
Where the indicator is pointing.
Watch in 1080 HD, full screen.
It's on 400x in this video.

Easier to see now?

I have more videos I can upload as I go.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vIEiGqy554&feature=youtu.be

Another video.

Watch in HD. Where the indicator is pointing.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Very good, dude! Now that's what we are after! It appears like that RBC on the second video may be a "colony" as I see multiple ketes swinging out of it.

That's a nice crisp view of things! Your DSLR does a great capture!

What kind of scope do you have? Did it come with a darkfield condenser when you bought it, or did you just get the darkfield?

Isn't microscopy SO exciting!? I'm glad you joined the thread! We need more recruits.

Is it possible to do darkfield at 1000x? I think I remember S13 mentioning that it's not possible at 1000x. That's too bad if not, because you could have REALLY been able to see that cell at 1000x if it would be possible.

How long after drawing you blood did you make the videos? It appears like you are not heavily infected, thankfully.

Some of the other members are doing time lapse. Can you do time lapse? I sure would like to but I need to get an eyepiece camera.

What bands showed on your Western Blot if I may ask? Some bands can cross react with other infections.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have a microscope camera I am gonna try as well.

I bought an Amscope T490-DK. Was only about 375 dollars, including dark field, useful up to the 40x.

It is possible to do dark field on 1000x. However, you need a dry or dark field lense with the aperture large enough. I could be wrong, and it might only be oil immersion, but you can buy condensers for this purpose.

I draw blood into vacationers. Generally, I have been viewing samples anywhere between 1 and 3 days after drawing the sample, and anywhere between 1 and 6 hours after applying to a slide.

Time lapse on my microscope camera won't seem to work, but I'll keep trying.

My history: I have been diagnosed with MS.
IgG: 31, 41
IgM: 39, 41
That's it.
I am also testing the blood of a co-worker, also diagnosed with MS. I find the same in his blood.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Keep up the good work. We would definitely be interested in seeing your time-lapse if you get that working.

quote:
and it might only be oil immersion, but you can buy condensers for this purpose.
Now that you mention it, I think I have seen info on oil condensers for darkfield.

quote:
I draw blood into vacationers.
I assume you mean you draw blood into vacuum containers, and not vacationers? Wow, a phlebotomist and a microscopist! Do you refrigerate the blood until you view it? Why do you draw the blood that far in advance?

Lymedin2010 has a blood slide making tutorial in which he shows how to seal off the coverslip with immersion oil to "preserve" the blood for longer viewing. That would help with getting a good time-lapse capture.

My brain isn't working very well today, so I can't go into much detail, but you definitely are positive for borreliosis: Band 39 is specific for Lyme, and your microscopy confirms it.

Bands 31 and 41 are not always specific for lyme and can cross-react with other infections. Those bands are also specific for Brucella, so they could possibly indicate a concurrent undiagnosed infection with that. (Very) possibly (I feel).

In fact, I found a description page about a test for Brucella that actually suggests that the Multiple Sclerosis epidemic could be connected to Brucellosis. So, it's not just because of Lyme. Read this description about Brucellosis:

Notice the last sentence in the first paragraph:

"...it is possible that there is a link between an infection with Brucella and the outbreak of multiple sclerosis."

http://www.ibl-international.com/en_us/brucella-igg?gclid=CJDJw5mpi8gCFYNFaQodrosMkA


And, here are PubMed articles showing the specificity of Osp (outer surface proteins) or Omp (outer membrane proteins) -- (referred to as "Bands" on the Western Blot) -- 31 and 41 for Brucella bacteria!!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14715555

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16817909


I personally feel this is an unseen epidemic even in the U.S. But, I won't take the time to go into that.

So, if you ever want to broaden your microscopy techniques, we have plenty of opportunity to delve into things like staining, fluorescence, DNA probing, culturing, etc.

Some of which we can possibly do ourselves with a little learning and practice (AND money).

These advanced techniques have the ability to help us better understand what each of us is dealing with!

Of course, simple microscopy, time-lapse, and staining is well within each of our abilities and means. We just need to keep at it and bring in more recruits!! [Smile]

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sorry, auto-correct.

Yes, Vacutainers. It changed this to vacationers for some reason.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I don't refrigerate it. I keep it at room temperature.

The blood I view over this longer period is blood I have drawn from others. It's just easier this way then saying hey, Come over to my house so I can draw blood real quick.

On top of that, I am trying to compare what I see in these longer samples than a straight draw.

I'd imagine the change in environment has an effect (98.6 degrees in body versus 70 degrees room temp), stuff like that.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vIEiGqy554&feature=youtu.be

Another video.

Watch in HD. Where the indicator is pointing.

Wow-- kansas dude----amazingly excellent video!! I can clearly see at least two spirochetes hanging off that red blood cell-- trying to suck the life out of you.

What microscope , magnification and stain did you use? I really like the resolution on your microscope. ( I want to buy a microscope but have been gun shy because I want to get a good one for spirochetes with dark field--- without having to spend $1,000s of dollars.
Anyway-- amazing work -- you deserve a "Spiro" award....(It looks like the oscar but is squiggly) LOL..

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wakeup:

I have the T490B-DK.
400x. (40x objective and 10x eyepiece).

I believe it was 375 dollars, off amazon.
Dark field useful up to 400x, which is what those videos are.
I filmed with my DSLR, however, through the eyepiece. I am waiting for an attachment to see if I can get better images with the DSLR in the trinocular port.
You can get excellent microscopes with dark field for cheap. This is obviously not lab/research quality, but things are still quite visible.

No stains, just dark field. I have to use and LED headlamp, as the bulb in the scope is not strong enough. 214 lumen headlamp for 10 dollars. (I only look in the microscope until i find something, then record. LED is bad for the retina, can be damaging).

This is a good breakdown:
T490B-DK (375 on amazon)
400x
Dark field
Slide and slip covers (cheap, like 12 dollars for 75 or so, and you just clean them with alcohol to reuse them all)
Samples tested up to 7 days after drawing (vacutainers), stored at room temp.
Some samples tested on blood slide over the course of 12 hours or more, as long as sample has not dried (start seeing the most around 2-4 hours after placing on slide)

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am looking for info on a research quality scope if anyone has advice?

I have a very specific reason that I need something good enough to capture pristine, sharp, clear images up to 1000X or higher.
I am looking at around 1500 dollars to 2000 dollars.

This microscope is adequate for finding, viewing, and recording, but I need something much greater in quality.
Not sure if just updating the 40x and 100x objectives with a higher quality objective lens would do the trick or not.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It's kind of hard to know what to advise without knowing exactly what you need it for.

But unless you want something special like an inverted scope (which are actually some of the cheaper research grade scopes from what I have seen), I would recommend an Olympus BH series. The BH series have a little age, but are definitely research grade.

Olympus microscopes are excellent! I don't think they make a cheap line like even Nikon has. Of course, I don't speak from actual experience, just from looking and watching them sell.

They can run well over $1000.00 (used). But, I saw a nice BH series with a case sell thru Ebay from a thrift store go for a little over $200.00. So, if you look and wait, you can sometimes get a really good deal.

Whatever brand you decide on, you can get a VERY nice (used) scope for the amount of money you have available.

I personally have fallen in love with (dark) phase contrast. They tend to be considerably more money, but you should still be able to get a pretty nice dark phase Olympus with that kind of money. A dark phase Olympus with a turret in excellent shape runs $1500.00-$2500.00.

Your idea about just swapping lens is an idea to consider if you would rather stash that cash away for something else (depending on how many lens you buy). The Objectives and oculars are really the main components on a scope, so if you would buy some high-end lens, you would in effect have the same grade of scope for some less. Buying lens individually can get expensive, though.

I think all objective lens nowadays (especially high-end ones) are infinity-corrected, so it wouldn't matter what scope you installed them on. Regardless of lens brand, I wouldn't consider any that are not "Plan Achromat."

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxJyT8BxYnA&feature=youtu.be

Best one at ~1:45 in the video. Quite long, too.

Obviously, watch in 1080P, full screen.

I have a few more videos, but it has been hard to get videos of them actual motile, moving freely in the serum and not attached to/coming out of RBC's.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0exzLApZBkE&feature=youtu.be

Another.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0exzLApZBkE&feature=youtu.be

Another.

Hi dudefrom kansas--

Thanks for the info on the scopes-- I will be buying one soon and am anxious to see whats in my own blood. I want to take vis of before and after herbal regimens.

I saw the spirochetes in the video of your blood above-- very good film!

I hope your red blood cells in the video above were old and drying-- because if not, the sharp spiky points on all your red blood cells might indicate that you have toxicity in your body, including heavy metals (aluminum or mercury) and/or pesticide exposure. How long does it take before round rbc's begin to look spiky like that?

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Yea, the crenation is from the blood simply drying/being exposed to the environment outside of the tubes/body.

It varies on when I start seeing more crenated RBC's.
I havne't paid much attention to that.

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here are a couple pics of biofilm in my blood:


An earlier pic with brightfield:

 -


A recent pic with dark phase contrast:

 -


Closer (notice a couple red blood cells at the top, and some platelets at the bottom, partially entrapped in the film):

 -


Really close. You can easily see the partially entrapped RBCs at the top. I don't know what the object in the middle is...perhaps a uric acid crystal or a piece of contaminant on the slide:

 -

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A Fry smear showing biofilm

 -

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
That's interesting.

Can you see any of that on live blood smears? Or is it only visible with staining?

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
All 4 pics of my blood (the brightfield and the dark phase) are live blood samples. There is no stain. The above (Fry) smear...originating from Fry Labratories, is stained.

It appears like the Fry smear might be a (modified?) Giemsa stain.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
thatdudefromkansas
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 46768

Icon 1 posted      Profile for thatdudefromkansas   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WDmCzJNnUo&feature=youtu.be

Any idea what this is?
I've seen reference to a Medusa's head?

They also appear segmented, similar to the string of pearls that I have seen photos of. My microscope video is better and seeing the segmentation, but that's on another computer.

Any ideas?

Posts: 163 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WDmCzJNnUo&feature=youtu.be

Any idea what this is?
I've seen reference to a Medusa's head?

I'm sorry dude, I'm not sure. Lymedin2010 or S13 will have to weigh in on that one. It looks similar to what I think could be l-forms in my own blood. If you could get a little more magnification on it, it may help narrow down the possibilities.


I just published the video of that biofilm in my blood. The video shows slightly more detail and proves it is live blood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpdL3d_Gojo

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow-- I just viewed this person's blood (channel name jasmine) on youtube-- this has got to be a very sick person, or perhaps its cotton tissue left on the slide--- the blood is riddled with long tendrils. Do you guys think that some of these are spirochetes?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKNd9s6P6N8

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Wow-- I just viewed this person's blood (channel name jasmine) on youtube-- this has got to be a very sick person, or perhaps its cotton tissue left on the slide--- the blood is riddled with long tendrils. Do you guys think that some of these are spirochetes?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKNd9s6P6N8

Some of the blood looks pretty good. The blood has plenty of immune components bouncing around (lysosomes), so it appears like their immune system is not too suppressed. I think they were viewing at the edge of the sample where the condition is often worse. The junk usually accumulates there.

That being said, I have never seen any parts of my samples look like that. I can't say what those "strings" are, but my OPINION is that they COULD be l-form (cell-wall-deficient) spirochetes, though they don't look like what I normally refer to as l-form ketes (the thicker, fainter-looking ketes with darker/brighter ends). I see lots of round forms among those strings that could POSSIBLY be round form (cyst) spirochetes. These are just guesses.

Without seeing active undulating (thinner, shorter) spirochetes with bulbous tips in this person's blood, I would be a bit hesitant to say they are definitely infected with borrelia.

We need more research about some of these "artifacts."

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The most informative live blood spirochete microscopy video I have seen to date--- I think the narrator is a microbiologist.

She covers identification of the many morphologies of spirochetes(including IDs of cell wall deficient forms versus cysts and blebs, string of pearls, etc), as well as IDing different types of lyme biofilms. One astounding piece of information she divulged is that cysts undergo reproduction inside the cyst wall, and when they burst open they contain 8-12 living spirochetes!!

This does not bode well for doxycycline treatment alone, which creates a large increase in cysts, while killing the living spirochetes. I got a screen shot of the chart of the morphologies for future reference..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_QO3QEr5W4

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
All 4 pics of my blood (the brightfield and the dark phase) are live blood samples. There is no stain. The above (Fry) smear...originating from Fry Labratories, is stained.

It appears like the Fry smear might be a (modified?) Giemsa stain.

Hi TNT-

Your live blood biofilm pics are excellent-- I think I can detect what Dr. MacDonald referred to as "water channels" inside your very own personal biofilm sludge! It would be very interesting to count biofilm blobs in an average 1/2 hour live blood session, and then begin to start a diet high in biofilm busting substances such as pomegranate, rosemary, cloves, mango, cinnamon, sarsaparilla, curry, etc..... or just take Eva Sapi's Samento/Banderol combination--- and then see if the count of biofilm blobs progressively goes down over time.

I think that liveblood microbiollogist (in the video I posted above) had stated that by the time she sees less than 5 live spirochetes in a 1 hour live blood session, the subject is usually symptom free. Of course our goal is ZERO spirochetes/cysts/lforms/blebs. LOL....

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Excellent photograph of a borrelia cyst, by the amazing Brorsons research team in Norway --- revealing multiple spirochetes inside--
 -

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WakeUp
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9977

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WakeUp     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Recognizing the stages of borrelia biofilm (Sapi 2012)-- Dr. MacDonald's famous "water channels" seem to be clearly visible in the older biofilm colony on the right of the image-- also the older biofilm has no spirochetes hanging off the edges-- Im assuming they are all sheltered inside "the structure." Does anybody know if the structure is composed of alginate or dead organisms-- or metals?

 -

Posts: 696 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Your live blood biofilm pics are excellent

Thanks WakeUp! And, thanks for your great contribution here on the microscopy thread, and the Spirocheticidal & Antibiofilm Compounds Thread!

As for breaking up the biofilm, my experience has been that I get more debilitated if I address biofilms and my antimicrobials are not strong enough to address what's being released out of the colonies' protective niche.

If you have sufficient firepower there when the bugs are flushed out (anti-biofilm agents are used), you will improve your health. If not, you will make yourself MUCH sicker. That was confirmed by my LLMD who is big into biofilm treatment.

I, too, think the number of organisms in the blood is a good indication of how well you are. Just don't forget we can't always easily see (or identify) the different morphologies. So, just because there are few ketes, doesn't mean there are few cysts or l-forms.

Also, there are unseen colonies in various body tissues that can seed the blood and rest of the body. So, NO ketes seen over an extended time period with multiple viewings is a safer gauge.

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TNT
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 42349

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TNT     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Excellent photograph of a borrelia cyst, by the amazing Brorsons research team in Norway --- revealing multiple spirochetes inside--
 -

Whoa, the cyst in that picture is HUGE!

I didn't realize they got that big. 5 microns? I wonder what the average size would be? Perhaps some of "candida-like" stuff I have seen could be cysts. They are as big as that many times.

Usually the "candida-like" objects are more uniform in roundness without the slightly ragged edge seen in this pic.

I'll try to look more carefully the next times.

Does anyone know the average size of cysts?

Posts: 1308 | From Eastern USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 21 pages: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  ...  19  20  21   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.