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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Never a Fever

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Author Topic: Never a Fever
phyl6648
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My temp is always sub-normal, even when sick I never have a fever.. Is this part of Lyme?
Posts: 1058 | From VA | Registered: Oct 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emla999/Lyme
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A very common symptom of hypothyroidism is having a low body temperature. But hypothyroidism can cause numerous other health problems as well such as chronic fatigue, brain fog and etc. So, you may have hypothyroidism.


And unfortunately, the vast majority of medical doctors don't seem to know how to properly diagnose or treat hypothyroidism.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FVNgYHLeYs&playnext=1&list=PLEC3BCF78F09A6370&feature=results_video


A list of symptoms that can be caused by hypothyroidism was taken from this website


http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/


■Less stamina than others (chronic fatigue)
■Less energy than others
■Long recovery period after any activity
■Inability to hold children for very long
■Arms feeling like dead weights after activity
■Chronic Low Grade Depression
■Suicidal Thoughts
Often feeling cold
■Cold hands and feet
■High or rising cholesterol
■Heart disease
■Palpitations
■Fibrillations
■Plaque buildup
■Bizarre and Debilitating reaction to exercise
■Hard stools
■Constipation
■Candida
■No eyebrows or thinning outer eyebrows
■Dry Hair
■Hair Loss
■White hairs growing in
■No hair growth, breaks faster than it grows
■Dry cracking skin
■Nodding off easily
■Requires naps in the afternoon
■Sleep Apnea (which can also be associated with low cortisol)
Air Hunger (feeling like you cant get enough air)
■Inability to concentrate or read long periods of time
■Forgetfulness
Foggy thinking (brain fog)
■Inability to lose weight
■Always gaining weight
■Weight loss (a small minority experience this)
■Inability to function in a relationship with anyone
■NO sex drive
■Failure to ovulate and/or constant bleeding (see Rainbows story)
■Moody periods
■PMS
■Inability to get pregnant; miscarriages
■Excruciating pain during period
■Nausea
■Swelling/edema/puffiness
■Aching bones/muscles
■Osteoporosis
■Bumps on legs
■Acne on face and in hair
■Breakout on chest and arms
■Hives
■Exhaustion in every dimensionphysical, mental, spiritual, emotional
■Inability to work full-time
■Inability to stand on feet for long periods
■Complete lack of motivation
■Slowing to a snails pace when walking up slight grade
■Extremely crabby, irritable, intolerant of others
■Handwriting nearly illegible
■Internal itching of ears
■Broken/peeling fingernails
■Dry skin or snake skin
■Major anxiety /worry
■Ringing in ears
■Lactose Intolerance
■Inability to eat in the mornings
Joint pain
■Carpal tunnel symptoms
■No Appetite
■Fluid retention to the point of Congestive Heart Failure
■Swollen legs that prevented walking
Blood Pressure problems
■Varicose Veins
■Dizziness from fluid on the inner ear
Low body temperature
■Tightness in throat; sore throat
■Swollen lymph glands
■Allergies (which can also be a result of low cortisolcommon with hypothyroid patients)
Headaches and Migraines
Sore feet, sore heels (plantar fascitis); painful soles of feet
■ Having a cold butt, cold hindquarters
■colitis
irritable bowel syndrome
■painful bladder
■Extreme hunger, especially at nighttime
■Dysphagia, which is nerve damage and causes the inability to swallow fluid, food or your own saliva and leads to aspiration pneumonia.


.

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phyl6648
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Emal, tks for the info.. I have had my thyroid checked several time. actually saw an endo..seems my T3 is a tad off but they weren't concerned since everything else is ok..

On the video it mentioned viruses and I did test positive for mono at one time. Just never know it its lyme or something else going on.. Today I feel like everything in my body is unplugged or caught a virus, like my computer .. Good info..

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dogmom2
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I think it may be part of lyme. my regular body temp is low, and even when i feel like a have a fever, my temp isn't even up to 98.6.
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Winni
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I am the exact same way. Prior to being diagnosed I wondered why my temp was always low. When I feel as if I have a fever, it is only around 98.3. Very strange feeling to be burning up and no real fever. Only a fever compared to MY norm.

--------------------
Winni

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emla999/Lyme
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Phyl6648 and others,


Dr. Broda Barnes and others seem to consider the basal body temperature to be better than blood tests when determining whether you are hypothyroid or not. And according to Dr. Barnes, if your temperature is under 97.8 - 98.2 taken first thing in the morning and before getting out of bed then you are most likely hypothyroid.


Also, having normal T3 levels don't mean that you are not hypothyroid. Your thyroid blood test panel should at least include the measuremennt of Free T3, Free T4, TSH, T3, T4 and Reverse T3 (RT3)......Free T3 and T3 are not the same thing. And even those tests are not 100% accurate. And Free T3 levels and other thyroid hormones levels can fluctuate throughout the day. And that can also make detecting hypopthyroidism more difficult.


http://recoveringwitht3.com/blog/thyroid-blood-tests-part-6-can-everyone-rely-ft4-ft3-and-rt3-blood-tests-during-treatment


http://recoveringwitht3.com/blog/thyroid-blood-tests-part-1-reference-ranges


Quotes from the article on the top link:


"There is no test for the actual level of cell regulation by thyroid hormone, relative to a healthy rate for us as individuals. Putting this more simply, there is no blood test that can indicate how well our bodies are actually responding to thyroid hormone. Let no one ever tell you otherwise."


"Simply looking at a blood artifact like FT3 or RT3 will not reveal a problem for some people. Since we have no useful laboratory tests to measure the actual level of regulation of cell function by thyroid hormone, then we can't know for sure what is really occurring within the tissues of the body"


"This research suggest that the current thyroid hormone blood tests of TSH, FT4 and FT3 fail to reflect actual levels of T3 in the body and that patients can continue to experience hypothyroidism even when thyroid hormone blood tests are normal. "


See the following link for more details:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC185993/


Some people have "normal" thyroid hormone panels but they still have symptoms of hypothyroidism and when they take the correct thyroid meds and use the correct dosing schedule many of those people seem to feel better.


So, just because your enodocrinologist says that you are not hypothyroid does not mean that you are not hypothyroid.


And more than likely you will have to go see a holistic oriented medical to have your thyroid checked. A full thyroid blood test panel should include the measuremennt of Free T3, Free T4, T3, T4 and Reverse RT3. It woul


So, if you truly want to know if you are hypothyroid or not you will probably have to go see a holistic minded mmedical doctor and you may also have to try a small dosage of a thyroid medication to see how it makes you feel. And it is better to do this under a doctor's supervision.


By the way, Paul Robinson's Circadian T3 method has seemed to help alot of people overcome their hypothrpoidism even when there their thyroid hormone blood tests were "normal".


And in my opinion, if you have a chronically low body temperature then the likelihood that you have hypothyroidism is extremely high.


I can't stress this enough!


.

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phyl6648
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Emla, tks again. I have so many symptoms they did the thyroid antibodies etc.. but my body temp. is never above 97 even when sick.. Its around 95 to 96 everyday.. Will a digital thermometer work to take the morning temp?

Will ck into this as I have often thought my thyroid especially at my age.. My mom, had thyroid problems, hypo..she is gone now. My daughter has hypo and granddaughter has hyper.. so it runs in the family..

There is no Holistic doc anywhere near where I live ... We are so limited in the area of any doctors...

Going to ck on this.. tks.

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emla999/Lyme
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Phyl6648,


Yes, a digital thermometer should be ok. Although, some doctors claim that taking your temperature with a Geratherm basal thermometer or by using one of those old timey mercury thermometers may be more accurate.


http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/temperature/


http://www.realthyroidhelp.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=17606&start=0


But if your temperature is never above 97 degrees at any time during the day then your basal temperature taken first thing in the morning is probably going to be less than 97 degrees because your body temperature tends to be at it's lowest point in the morning and then it will usually slowly rise throughout the day until around 6-8pm.


And since your body temperature never goes above 97 degrees throughout the day, that is an indicator that you may be hypothyroid because your thyroid plays a big role in the regualtion of your body temperature.


And since thyroid problems run in your family and since you are experiencing so many problems that could be due to hypothyroidism it may be extremely helpful for you to find a mediacal doctor that actually knows how to properly diagnose and treat hypothyroidism.


But unfortunately, it can be very difficult to find a medical doctor that actually knows how to properly diagnose and treat hypothyroidism.


If I find a doctor close to you then I will send you PM.


.

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Razzle
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Don't also neglect to consider the impact on body temp. that the adrenal glands can have...low body temp. is not just an indicator for thyroid issues, but also of adrenal problems.

And the part of the brain that regulates body temp. is often affected by Lyme/coinfections.

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

Posts: 4166 | From WA | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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