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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Dry Brittle Hair

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Author Topic: Dry Brittle Hair
terv
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Over the past year my hair has been becoming straighter (only one side of the head). Recently over the last 3 months it has gotten very brittle and is falling out.

My thyroid numbers look good. LLMD said it is the lyme but I failed to ask why.

Anyway to correct this besides get rid of the lyme? Or any other suggestions on what could be causing it? Possible hormones?

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Pocono Lyme
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I wouldn't rule out thyroid problems with "normal" labs.

If you look here you'll find some information from emla.
http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/122522

Emla has very good information.
I had the very same issue and thyroid tests have always been "normal".

Since starting treatment for hypothyroidism, no more hair loss nor dry brittle hair. I've also had other improvements.

A bioidentical hormone replacement doctor is treating me.

emla has other posts but I couldn't readily find them. If you do a search, I'm sure you'll find more good info.

--------------------
2 Corinthians 12:9-11


9 But he said to me, �My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.� Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ�s power may rest on me.

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terv
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I am on 7.5 mcg cytomel. My labs are as follows

Thyroxine (T4) Free 0.99 range .82 - 1.77
TSH 3.26 range .45 - 4.55
Reverse T3 3.26 range .45 - 4.55
Triiodothyronine, Free 2.5 range 2.0 - 4.4

TSH is a little high. I will read your threads. Thinking about it my hair was fine until I started cytomel.

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Lymetoo
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Take lots of coconut oil!! I increased my usage of c. oil several months ago and even my hairdresser noticed a difference in my hair!

It is normally stick straight but now is getting little waves in it. Slight, but overall my hair has more body and lift.

I'm ingesting about 3-4 tablespoons of c. oil daily plus juicing and drinking green smoothies.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Pocono Lyme
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I don't know if this will help. I wish I knew more since I'm new to the thyroid scene.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnE-wPm3nPY&feature=colike

I found some useful information here too.
http://recoveringwitht3.com/blog

I'll see if I can find more from emla.
I'm sure I saved it. The question is. Where?! [bonk]

--------------------
2 Corinthians 12:9-11


9 But he said to me, �My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.� Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ�s power may rest on me.

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terv
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Another thing I forgot to mention is that my hair is also falling out. I have hair all over the bathroom and in the drain.
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linky123
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Biotin, which is vitamin B7, and Nioxin shampoo -kind of expensive, but it lasts a long time and it really works.

The cheapest I've found it is at the salon in the Walmart Super Center.

Hope this helps.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

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luvema
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I had very long hair... almost to my upper thigh. Very thick, strong, and healthy. This sadden me, now my hair is very think. It's always falling out. it breaks easy, and it's brittle.

I honestly don't know how to fix this. I tried many treatments. Olive oil and coconut oil included. When my symptoms are less sever my hair tends to get better.

So, I am assuming when your body heals, everything else does.

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Ema

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by linky123:
Biotin, which is vitamin B7, and Nioxin shampoo -kind of expensive, but it lasts a long time and it really works.


-
Yes. Sometimes that will work too!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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annxyzz
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MSM gets great reviews for hair and skin and nails. If you google "msm hair " you will find blogs where women say it greatly improves hair quality and helps with hair loss .

It also benefits mucousal linings and joints and cartilege . I just bought some after reading MANY positive reviews at iherb and amazon . It also is helpful with interstitial cystitis - with the lining of the bladder and the lining of lungs . And it is dirt cheap!

--------------------
annxyzz

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terv
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Thanks for the replies.

My hair is also ok on top and it is the ends that are dry and brittle.

The dermatologist put me on biotin 6 months ago. I take Pure Encapsulations for that.

Reading about it more on the internet, i am starting to think my problem is hormonal. Last February for no apparent reason, my periods stopped. I had some labs done which indicated I was post menopause. I didn't even go through menopause.

Anyway, I see my hormone doctor in 2 weeks. I am on bio-identical estrogen and progesterone but am lazy about the progesterone because it requires me to fabricate a 28 day cycle and I forget about when day 14 is.

Vitex was suggested to me on another thread for my hormones. I will also look into the msm and coconut oil.

Thanks again.

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emla999/Lyme
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Terv, hairloss can be caused caused by other things besides hypothyroidism but hairloss is a very common symptom of hypothyroidism.


And if you go by newer research, your lab work does indicate that you are probably hypothyroid and are not adequately being treated for hypothyroidism. Having a TSH over 2.0 uIU/L is indicative that you are hypothyroid. Plus, in my opinion, your Free T3 level is on the low side.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=122383;p=0


But unfortunately, even if your blood test was normal that would not necessarily rule out that you have hypothyroidism because thyroid blood testing is not 100% accurate.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=122522;p=0


So, some people consider symptoms and your response to an adequate dose of thyroid replacement therapy to be a better indicator of whether or not you have hypothyroidism.


Symptoms that hypothyroidism can cause are numerous e.g., low body temperature, cold hands and feet, chronic fatigue, hairloss, weight problems, headaches, brain fog, joint problems, depression, anxiety and etc.


A list of symptoms that can be caused by hypothyroidism


http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/


Also, you said that you were taking 7.5 mcg Cytomel (T3). And to me, that seems like a fairly small dosage. Especially so, if you are only taking that Cytomel dose once per day. If you are taking that dosage only once per day and you do have hypothyroidism then taking 7.5 mcg of Cytomel may not be helping you all that much.


Some people with hypothyroidism have found that they need to take Cytomel multiple times throughout the day....... anywhere from 2 to 4 times per day and sometimes more often than that to keep the T3 blood levels adequate for them.


Plus many people with hypothyroidism and adrenal fatigue have found that they also need to take a circadian dose of Cytomel (T3) along with their other doses of Cytomel.


A circadian dose of Cytomel T3 is when you take a dose of T3 a couple of hours prior to your usual awakening time. So, you would have to set an alarm clock to do this. Taking a circadian dose of T3 has corrected many people's adrenal fatigue and helped them to overcome their hypothyroid symptoms.


Also, the Cytomel or T3 hormone may not being utilized effectively by your body if you have adrenal fatigue/insufficiency or if you a nutritional deficiency of some sort or if you have blood sugar regulation problems.


Having an adequate and steady supply of glucose and having certain nutrients is required for optimal utilization of thyroid hormones. By the way, low carb diets may possibly induce hypothyoidism. Low caloried diets can do this as well.


Few people seem to know that eating a low carbohydrate diet can LOWER your T3 thyroid level and eating a diet that contains ample carbohydrates can increase your T3 thyroid levels.


*****And T3 is the active thyroid hormone that our body needs.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15142639


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1249190


.

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terv
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I am on 7.5 SR cytomel. Reading in one of your threads it sounds like this isnt good.

I do have regular 5 mcg cytomel so I will go back to that and look into how to dose it (from one of your threads).

Yes I am on a low carb diet due to the yeast thing.

I have really bad insomnia so I hesitate to take anything after noon.

In summary, is cytomel the key to thyroid treatment? When does one take synthroid?

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emla999/Lyme
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quote:
In summary, is cytomel the key to thyroid treatment? When does one take synthroid?
Taking Cytomel can be the key for some people with hypothyroidism but this is not always the case.


Alot of people with hypothyroidism seem to be helped by thyroid medications that contain both T3 and T4 such as Armour or ERFA. So, taking Cytomel isn't the key for everyone.


But taking Cytomel at the correct dosage and using the correct dosaging schedule can definetly be key for some people with hypothyroidism.


Now in regards to Synthroid.


If you are someone that has hypothyroidism that can still effeciently convert T4 into T3, then taking Synthroid may be helpful to you.


Synthroid contains only the T4 thyroid hormone. But T3 is the active thyroid hormone that your body needs to function properly. And in a perfectly healthy human body, T4 is converted into T3 in the correct amount needed by the body.


But some people seem unable to convert T4 into T3 effecicently so taking Synthroid and or even Armour may not be of any benefit to them. So, some people will have to take something like Cytomel (T3). When you take Cytomel your body is taking T3 directly in and thus no conversion of T4 into T3 is required.


So, if you are hypothyroid and taking Synthroid or Armour doesn't seem to be helping you or is even making you feel more hypothyroid then this may be an indication that your body is not converting T4 into T3. And thus you may need to take Cytomel at various times throughout the day.


Synthroid and T4 also have a much longer "half life" inside the body than does Cytomel (T3). And thus Synthroid and other T4 containing medications can usually be taken just once per day.


But Cytomel or another thyroid medication that contains just T3 have a fairly short half life inside of the body. So, Cytomel will usually have to be taken multiple times throughout day to be effective. And sometimes people with hypothyroidism and adrenal fatigue may also need to take a "Circadian dose" of Cytomel plus take Cytomel multiple times throughout the day.

*****Taking a circadian dose of Cytomel (T3) can be very important for some people with hypothyroidism and adrenal fatigue/low cortisol.


And, the slow release version of Cytomel may not be the optimal form of Cytomel. You said, that you are taking 7.5 mcg of the slow release form of Cytomel. Well, that would mean that your body is only getting a relatively small dose of T3 at any one point throughout the day. So, with the slow release version of Cytomel your body may not be getting a high enough blood level of T3 to make you feel better...... especially given the fairly low dose of Cytomel that you are taking.


More about that on the link down bellow.


http://tinyurl.com/adg9236


And if you plan on taking Cytomel, I would highly recommend that you read Paul Robinson's book, "Recovering with T3" and you may need to have a 24 hour adrenal saliva test done to determine your cortisol production and to determine if you have mild adrenal fatigue.


Hypothroidism seems to be able to cause a form of adrenal fatigue and taking a circadian dose of Cytomel (T3) seems to be helpful in correcting that form of adrenal fatigue.


http://www.amazon.com/Recovering-T3-Journey-Hypothyroidism-Thyroid/dp/0957099304/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1360523971&sr=1-1&keywords=recovering+with+t3


http://recoveringwitht3.com/blog?f[0]=field_tags%3A29


.

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jupiter76
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i.m.o. it is the inflammation of the small veins that supply the hair root or it is the hypercoagulation bacause of that the blood doesnt flow like it should in the smal veins.

If never seen anyone with hypothyriodismn who lost so much hair like I did. Give thyroxin a try but in most cases it isnt the cause for the hairloss (alone).

I my case the hair loss increased with treatment an feeling better. Thats why i think it has something to do with the inflammation which becomes worse under die off.

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