LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » I have all symptoms of hashimotos but tests say no

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: I have all symptoms of hashimotos but tests say no
gigimac
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 33353

Icon 1 posted      Profile for gigimac     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I had already ruled out hashimotos by blood test but I have all the symptoms and after just doing 23andme test it revealed I have a gene that suggest a have an increased risk of hashimotos.

Are there any tests besides just tsh to test for it?

I know this is a really dumb question but could i try to get doc to just give me synthroid to see if it would help even without positive test?

Posts: 1533 | From Greensboro NC | Registered: Aug 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I would not rely on one thyroid test. Typical thyroid tests can be a bit out to lunch, especially considering those with lyme.

And also know that lyme in always involved in thyroid stress. It's hard to separate the "dancers" to see just which is most responsible for being out of step.

A good LL doctor is your best bet. They will know how lyme and thyroid interact and how not just to interpret that one thyroid test but how to order others - and "read" what they see before their eyes, too.

A good LL ND (naturopathic doctor) can help with thyroid SUPPORT and also prescribe a natural thyroid T3 / T 4 based upon a range of assessments, not just one test, but a collection.

Still, don't assume that the symptoms of HT means it's necessary haywire. It's a bit more complicated that just "Is it or Isn't it?"

Lyme, itself, can cause all the symptoms. It takes a skilled LL doctor to sort it all out.


In addition to addressing infection(s) head on with a thorough protocol:
-----------

This author discusses the importance of addressing hormonal imbalance in chronic Lyme disease

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Heal+the+hormones+to+heal+from+Lyme+disease.-a0231544999


HEAL THE HORMONES TO HEAL FROM LYME DISEASE

- by Connie Strasheim - Townsend Letter - July, 2010

be sure to scroll down past a section of ads that looks like the end of the article. This is a four-page article.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emla999/Lyme
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 12606

Icon 1 posted      Profile for emla999/Lyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If you suspect that you may have Hashimoto's Disease or hypothyroidism then I would suggest that you read Paul Robinson's book, "Recovering with T3". Paul had Hashimoto's Disease and hypothyroidism.


Also, I am not sure if there is a test that is a 100% accurate at detecting the early stages of Hashimoto's Disease.


But usually, a medical doctor will perform a TPO and Tg autoantibodies blood test to help determine whether or not you have Hashimoto's Disease. A doctor may also use other diagnostic methods such as taking an ultrasound of your thyroid gland.


And since Hashimoto's Disease can cause hypothyroidism a doctor will also usually check your TSH blood levels.

And some doctors will also go ahead and check your Free T3, Free T4, TT3, TT4 and RT3 (Reverse T3) blood levels when they check your TSH. Those blood tests can be helpful in determining whether or not you have hypothyroidism.


Though, no blood test is a 100% accurate for diagnosing hypothyroidism. So, if your thyroid hormone blood test panel comes back "normal" that does not necessarily mean that you do not have hypothyroidism.


Going by your symptoms may be a better way to determine whether or not you have hypothyroidism.


And for some people, the only way that they seem to able to determine whether or not they have hypothyroidism and to see if their symptoms will improve by taking thyroid medication is to do a trial of thyroid medication such as Cytomel (T3)or possibly Armour.


And if you do have hypothyroidism then taking Synthroid (synthetic T4) may or may not help you to feel better. Actually, some peope with hypothyroidism can feel worse when they take a T4 containg medication such as Synthroid or Armour because their body can't seem to convert T4 into T3.


The active thyroid hormone that your body needs is T3. Most people's body seems to be able to convert T4 into T3. But since some people seem to have difficulty in converting T4 into T3, some people must take Cytomel (T3) or something similar.


Furthermore, with the exception of the bull's eye rash and possibly fever, hypothyroidism can cause nearly all of the same symptoms that Lyme Disease can. And in my opinion, most medical doctors (and that's including LLMD's) do not know how to properly diagnose and treat hypothyroidism.


Long and Pathetic List of Symptoms of Hypothyroidism


http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/long-and-pathetic/


If My Thyroid Labs Are Normal, Why Do I Feel So Bad?


http://www.drrind.com/therapies/thyroid-scale


Hypothyroidism group on Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/T3onlySTTMdiscussion/


.

Posts: 1223 | From U.S.A | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
poppy
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5355

Icon 1 posted      Profile for poppy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Good job emla.

The test numbers that are considered normal now by most of the medical establishment are not, and a lot of people who need treatment don't get it. You have to find a doc who will experiment, or better still, one of the handful of docs who know the old way of determining low thyroid function (symptoms).

Hashimotos and hypothyroidism are not always found together. That is, you can have low thyroid function and not the autoimmune part. As you may know, lyme does cause some autoimmune markers to appear. People who successfully treat lyme have these go away.

Posts: 2888 | From USA | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pinelady
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 18524

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Pinelady     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree---IMO all gladular diseases are caused by the stealth of spirochetal infections knowing 80% of the pop.s are infected...

The gland can grow due to disease to produce a goiter or the infections can completely destroy the gland...

Treating the Lyme should halt the disease progression.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

Posts: 5850 | From Kentucky | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
docluddite
Member
Member # 36032

Icon 1 posted      Profile for docluddite     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A normal TSH rules out nothing.
Posts: 60 | From Maine | Registered: Jan 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
docluddite
Member
Member # 36032

Icon 1 posted      Profile for docluddite     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
A normal TSH rules out nothing.
Posts: 60 | From Maine | Registered: Jan 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sammi
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 110

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sammi     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Which tests have you had done?

It is important to have the Free T3, Free T4 (besides the T3 and T4) and thyroid antibodies tested. Positive antiboidies indicates Hashimoto's.

As I have posted before, I had hypothyroid symptoms for years and years. I was repeatedly told my test results were normal and nothing needed to be done. Finally, a doctor ran the antibody tests. Normal range was something like 0-30 and my result was over 2000! This showed that I have Hashimoto's. Some people with Hashimoto's have other results in the normal range, but treatment is warranted.

Also there is a lot of room to work in the "normal range." For me personally, I feel best when the Free Ts are in the upper one-third of the range.

It can be hard to find a truly knowledgeable thyroid doctor, but they do exist. You may be able to find some helpful information at http://thyroid.about.com/cs/basics_starthere/l/blforum.htm

Posts: 4680 | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
gigimac
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 33353

Icon 1 posted      Profile for gigimac     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I don't think I have had the antibody test. I will look into getting it. Does anybody know if you can do this test yourself from an online lab like directlabs?
Posts: 1533 | From Greensboro NC | Registered: Aug 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sammi
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 110

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sammi     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I don't know. I have always had it done via a doctor.
Posts: 4680 | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Carol in PA
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 5338

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Carol in PA     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Gigimac, one thing you could do while you sort this out would be to look into coconut oil.
Coconut oil does something with the thyroid that increases metabolism.

I found this out firsthand when I ate two or three ounces of coconut cream concentrate daily.
Over a period of two months, I lost ten pounds without doing anything else.

I did not exercise (I have chronic fatigue) and I ate everything I usually do.
I chose coconut cream concentrate from Tropical Traditions company rather than plain coconut oil, because it tasted better and was easier to eat than plain oil.


I think I may have Wilson's Syndrome, as my body temperature is low.
My TSH, thyroid stimulating hormone, tested in the "normal" range, so my doc wouldn't consider treatment.
I have great difficulty losing weight.

There was a downside to taking coconut.
In the process of burning fat for energy, the kidneys work harder and produce more urine.
This wasn't a problem when I was awake, but I woke up every hour or two with a bursting full bladder, and I suffered from sleep deprivation.


You can google for thyroid, coconut oil, to find lots of information.

Posts: 6947 | From Lancaster, PA | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emla999/Lyme
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 12606

Icon 1 posted      Profile for emla999/Lyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Gigimac,

Yes, you can use an online lab service to test your thyroid function.


Here is one such lab.


http://www.healthcheckusa.com/STTM-Ultimate-Thyroid-Panel/46925/


But testing is not 100% accurate. So, even if your test results are normal that does not rule out the possibility that you have hypothyroidism.


.

Posts: 1223 | From U.S.A | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
emla999/Lyme
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 12606

Icon 1 posted      Profile for emla999/Lyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Gigimac,

Yes, you can use an online lab service to test your thyroid function.


Here is one such lab.


http://www.healthcheckusa.com/STTM-Ultimate-Thyroid-Panel/46925/


But testing is not 100% accurate. So, even if your test results are normal that does not rule out the possibility that you have hypothyroidism.


Some more info about thyroid testing


http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/recommended-labwork/


.

Posts: 1223 | From U.S.A | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
n.northernlights
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 17934

Icon 1 posted      Profile for n.northernlights     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
what ddi your test say, what was your TSH? Note that some labs have a way too wide reference range for TSH.

Also, tests must be done first thing in the morning, as already after 10 the TSH number is half the morning number.

One can raise the TSH number by staying awake all night before the test first thing in the morning.

Posts: 366 | From Europe | Registered: Nov 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
OtterJ
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 30701

Icon 1 posted      Profile for OtterJ     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
GigiM, the Hashimoto's test tests for antibodies against your thyroid tissue. TSH tests only your pituitary's ability to make Thyroid Stimulating Hormone. You will need a full panel, TSH, T4 T3 to see how you thyroid and pituitary are functioning. It will not tell you about Hashimoto's disease.You need a pituitary endocrinologist to help test for thyroid disease. If you have a teaching hospital in your area, call the patient registration office and ask if they have a discount program for those unable to afford medical care. This is for people who are not eligible for medicaid/medicare who have too much money. With that, you could get tests, but you don't have to rely on them for your lyme treatment.
Posts: 481 | From Oregon | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.