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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Upcoming surgery-Please set my mind at ease

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Author Topic: Upcoming surgery-Please set my mind at ease
tickled1
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I will be undergoing gallbladder removal next week and I am scared. I have never had surgery before and am scared of general anesthesia as I'm very sensitive to everything.

I don't detox well and have a lot of allergies and dysautonomia. I also have d-lactate acidosis so I don't want them to use lactated ringers. Does anyone know if lactated ringers are normally used during surgery?

Has anyone here undergone surgery while very sick and come out of it ok? I am nowhere near as sick as I was a couple of years ago but am still worried and especially worried that this could cause me to backslide.

I also have a trip planned to Disney in April. Something that was out of the question until now and is even borderline at this point as to whether or not I have to stamina for this kind of trip.

The gallbladder is being removed due to low ejection fraction by the way.

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didogs
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Tickled-I had my gall bladder removed a few years ago. Long before I knew I had lyme, but in hindsight, gallbladder inflammation was probably caused by lyme. So I can't comment on whether it may make you backslide, etc. I can tell you that recovery for me was relatively easy. After about a week, I felt pretty decent. Still had to takeit easy but it really wasn't bad at all. I was taking short walks after a few days and it honestly was an easy recovery. Good luck and hopefully you can enjoy Disney!!
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poppy
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You have told them you have allergies and never had general anesthesia before? Ask them about ringers. They need to know these things. Tell them by phone, but also type up a statement of these things and give it to them when you go in for the surgery. No need to mention lyme.
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faithful777
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I had my gallbladder out a little over a year ago and yes, I was sick then. Most doctors do it laparoscopically and recovery is fairly quick.

I laid low for about three days just because I felt tired and then felt a lot better after a little rest. I resumed activity slowly. I felt much better after getting it out.

--------------------
Faithful

Just sharing my experience, I am not a doctor.

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tickled1
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I put Lyme, Fibro, allergies, dysautonomia, no lactated ringers all on the intake form which I assume they will go over. Would you say that's sufficient? The surgeon knows about the Lyme.
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tickled1
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I am hoping that removing it will help me feel better. They are making me stay overnight the night of surgery which surprised me.

May I ask your reason for having it out?

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gmb
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Have you shared your list of ABX and supplements with the Dr.? They flagged a bunch of my supps and I was told to stop taking some of them for two weeks before surgery.

Seems their anti-iflammatory properties thins the blood. Probiotics was one that puzzled me.

I also read in Buhners book to stop Cats Claw for two weeks before surgery.

I had cut tendons repair last June and it was my first surgery with general anesthesia. All went well.

good luck

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tickled1
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I've told him my prescription meds. The only other thing I didn't tell him about was B Complex which I can't imagine would be a problem.

I'm thinking maybe I put too much information on the form. I put everything from Lyme to CFS, to adrenal fatigue, dysautonomia, mitral valve prolapse, fibromyalgia.......too much?

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Keebler
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quote: "which I can't imagine would be a problem." (end quote)

EVERYTHING you take needs to be listed and mentioned. Everything.

Now, I'm a huge fan of naturopathic medicine and I would not even think about surgery without a consult with a good ND trained in surgerical counseling . . . because some things must be stopped and some things can be taken (most specifically some homeopathics, perhaps).

A ND with surgical expertise would know more but, still, your surgeon MUST have a list of even vitamins.

AFTERWARD, if at all possible, IMO, a ND would be essentail to help with liver support herbs as the drugs used in surgery can be especially hard on the liver and the soonest possible time after surgery for some specific support for you, the better.
-

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Keebler
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Quote: "I'm thinking maybe I put too much information on the form. I put everything from Lyme to CFS, to adrenal fatigue, dysautonomia, mitral valve prolapse, fibromyalgia.......too much?" (end quote)

Why would that be too much? I would WANT any surgeon to know all that. Of course, as with most doctors, they may think anyone with "all that" is a malingerer but you can't take the chance that - hopefully - they understand the dynamics of it all and also know that there really is no such thing as fibromyagia (that it's nearly always a chronic stealth infection).

Still, FM is important to mention so they at least have a basic understanding of your case. FM is really a symptom, not a diagnose, though, IMO. Still, they at least know the word and the symptoms.

"CFS" will likely be discounted but, still, it's important to list it. Again, perhaps you will have a surgeon who understand that, like FM, CFS is nearly always due to some chronic stealth infection.

Glad to see that you have listed lyme. Actually, lyme is likely the reaons for all the other dx.

Whether they "believe" in lyme or not, on the hopeful chance that you just might have a more open doctor, it's still important for them to at least know. Keep it on the list but know that they may keep their distance about that.

And, has your LLMD reviewed the drugs you will be given pre-surgery, during and post-surgery?

Often, steroids are used in surgery to reduce swelling. This can spell disaster for someone with lyme IF proper precautions with antibiotics are not taken.
-

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ladycakes
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I also listed EVERYthing I could think of for the surgeon/anesthesiologist. You never know what's medically relevant and what's not, so just give them the info.

I'm not exceptionally sick now (I had the surgery beginning of February), I'm back to about 85%. However, I'm the person that makes that "1% of patients may experience..." statement necessary on medication commercials. And I'd never had any kind of surgery at all before, so I was worried.

I recovered super fast from having my gall bladder out, and I didn't suffer any kind of set-back with regards to my Lyme. So I would say to read up on possibilities and be prepared, but don't get too nervous about it. It was sort of a breeze, for me.

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Keebler
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-
There are some surgeons who are more naturopathic minded.

And some hospitals have NDs on staff, especially in the cancer care centers. Some also employ ND who are trained in acupuncture &/or L.Ac.s (acupuncturists) who can administer acupuncture.

I would like to have acupuncture before surgery if I ever need that again. It can be used to lessen the knock-out drugs that are so hard on the liver.

Even one's regular ND or LAc may be able to come to hospital and treat but they'd have to be on staff. Many are, depending upon your state and the hospital, of course. If you receive regular acupuncture, your ND / LAc may be able to show you some

ACUPRESSURE POINTS that you can do yourself.

THIS would be the kind of doctor we all would hope to find:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZWh-Dy_0sg

Surgery & Naturopathic Medicine
Uploaded on Oct 21, 2011

Dr.Red Hoffman, discusses her experience at SCNM and how it influenced her as a future surgeon.

---------------------------------------

http://www.motherearthliving.com/health-and-wellness/holistic-healing-for-surgery.aspx

HOLISTIC HEALING FOR SURGERY

A trip to the hospital doesnt have to mean a trip away from natural health. Start planning for a speedy recovery before you ever leave home.

- By Amy Baugh-Meyer - MotherEarth Living magazine - January/February 2000

A very detailed & excellent article. Scroll down to see:

[This article's author, Amy Baugh-Meyer, is an editorial intern at Herbs for Health. She recently experienced a successful herb-and-nutrient supported surgery.]

A NUTRIENT PROGRAM FOR BEFORE & AFTER SURGERY

This program, created by Elson Haas, M.D., is designed to speed tissue healing after surgery and to strengthen the immune system. Follow these recommendations for about three

to four weeks prior to your surgery and four to six weeks after.
-

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Keebler
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MASSAGE is also something that would be of great benefit all along the way. Closer to the day of surgery a full body massage may or may not be a good idea but a certified LMT (licensed massage therapist should know or find out).

Even if not a full body massage close to the time, shoulder, foot, hand massages can be very helpful for many reasons.
-

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Keebler
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-
http://drdavidbrownstein.blogspot.com/2011/07/why-my-mother-refused-to-eat-hospital.html

Friday, July 22, 2011

WHY MY MOTHER REFUSED TO EAT HOSPITAL FOOD

- By Dr. David Brownstein


Categories of chemicals in this group are no better for those in hospital than for anyone else, yet hospital food is swamped in additives such as these:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=029690;p=0

Excitotoxins; MSG; Aspartame; & "Natural" Flavors

----------------------------

If it were myself, I would make it a point to call admissions prior - find out more about exactly what kinds of foods, how gathered, how prepared, etc.

You might want to officially opt-out of all hospital foods (so you or ins. won't be billed for trash) . . . have friends or family bring your food.

There is usually a small fridge on each floor or section for patients. You'd want to be sure whatever you bring is sealed very well, of course.

Afterward, carrot and veggie juice with hemp protein powder added just before drinking might be your mainstay.

Quinoa Flakes would be easy to have with you, no fridge needed. Just add hot water, cover a minute. But in a ceramic cup - NO PLASTICS.

You may have to take your own mug but it's worth it.
-

[ 03-04-2013, 04:26 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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Backing up, you asked about lactated ringers.

You should be able to have an appointment with the anthesiology staff to address all your questions - in enough advance time for them to be able to fully consider the uniqueness of your case. Not just the day before as is often the case.
-

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Keebler
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Drugs & Porphyria ?

Fasting not advised as it can trigger porphyria attacks.

Do you have MCS? Multiple Chemical sensitivies would also require some attention. Some hospitals have a MCS policy, some don't.

If you have MCS, though, they need to know and any drug that could trigger porphryia would need to be carefully weighed.

FASTING is also not good for anyone with MCS who has problems with porphyria (as most do). An IV glucose line should be put in so that your body would not be fasting.


http://ciin.org/mcs.html

About MCS (Multiple Chemical Sensitivities)

. . . Disorders of Porphyrinopathy . . .

==================================

http://planetthrive.com/2010/04/hpukpu-protocol-for-lyme-and-autism/

HPU / KPU Protocol - Planet Thrive

===================================

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/91842?#000000

Topic: what type of M.D. tests for PORPHYRIA

Many good links here

---------------------

If you have your gallbladder removed, it would be a perfect tissue supply to test for porphyria.

It may be your best chance to do this, actually. If they can test the gallbladder tissue, it can be more accurate and easier than other tests - and then you'd have more information about why it's hard to detox. If porphyria, that could explain a great deal.
-

[ 03-04-2013, 04:31 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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-
http://planetthrive.com/2009/08/chemical-sensitivity-hospitalization-tips/

MCS Hospitalization Tips (at Planet Thrive)

Page takes a while to load, stick with it. This is a gold mine of important details. There are many excellent links here, just click onto the titles in navy blue. For a start:

http://www.healsoaz.org/first_do_no_harm.htm

First Do No Harm

The Challenge of Patients with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS)

- by Ann McCampbell, MD, written for Emergency Medical Service personnel in New Mexico.
-

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Keebler
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-
I am really sorry for tossing all this at you (really, I am). I hope that none of it is new to you and that all who are caring for you, professionally and personally, are on the same page.

You might call the PATIENT ADVOCATE at the hospital today and see if they have someone who can answer some of your questions.

Especially, if you require avoidance of certain chemicals & scents. You might ask what their MCS policy is and to have them send you a link to that so you can review it.

Find out if any NATUROPATHIC DOCTORS are on hospital staff, even if adjunct. Then, even if not offered in your "wing" - call them and see if they might be able to counsel you, or even be an official doctor on your case.

Of course, not likely to be covered by insurance but there are some instances where this can happen.

You might call your state naturopathic organization and find out if anyone has worked with the hospital you will be in. Might any ND have written an article or done any kind of projects that would bring embrace all this?


Authors listed in the PLANET THRIVE set from the post above may know of someone in your city who is up to speed on all this.
-

[ 03-04-2013, 04:34 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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-
After surgery, to help prevent formation of scar tissue (actually, I hope you may have had this as an option all along in case some restrictions might be resolved non-invasively).

VISCERAL MANIPULATION

http://iahe.com/html/therapies/vm.php

Visceral Manipulation / Neural Manipulation / New Manual Articular Approach

Visceral Manipulation was developed by French Osteopath, Jean-Pierre Barral. At optimal health, the relationship between the organs (viscera) and structures of the body (muscles, membranes, fasciae and bones) remains stable despite the body's endless varieties of motion.

But when one organ can't move in harmony with its surrounding viscera due to abnormal tone, adhesions or displacement, it works against all the body's organs and structures.

This disharmony creates fixed, abnormal points of tension that the body is forced to move around. That chronic irritation, in turn, paves the way for disease and dysfunction.

Visceral Manipulation (VM) is a gentle hands-on therapy that works through the body's visceral system (the heart, liver, intestines and other internal organs) to locate and alleviate these abnormal points of tension throughout the body.


http://www.upledger.com/content.asp?id=26

CranioSacral Therapy

[this type is excellent for those with lyme as there is no sudden twisting of the spine or neck - which should
never be done with some who deals with lyme]


http://www.upledger.com/findapractitioner.asp

FIND A THERAPIST trained in UPLEDGER TECHNIQUE (not all trained in cranial-sacral also have the visceral training so do ask first.)

Some who are trained in this (such as a D.O. or P.T.) may be covered by your insurance.
-

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Keebler
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You say that your body has challenges with detoxifying. As glutathione is essential to that process and acetaminophen blocks glutathione, be sure to avoid that. It's tossed around like candy in the hospital.

As many drugs are also hard for those with detox issues, I'm not sure what would be given. Hopefully, your regular doctor or a LL ND are already working with you and they may have some suggestions to discuss with your surgeons.

But know that your surgeon may not be the same doctor who will be the hospital staff doctor to prescribe for you after surgery.

Detail here about why to avoid acetaminophen. If it must be taken, I wonder if a GLUTATHIONE IV -- &/or IV MAGNESIUM might be possible.

Actually, right after surgery, IV MAGNESIUM can be excellent to lessen both pain and inflammation. And it helps the liver, too. You may have to fight for that, though. Hopefully, you already have a doctor who knows all this.

Taurine in with the magnesium, even better. And MASSAGE &/or acupuncture / homeopathics in hosptial.

See the acetaminophen and ibuprofen links here:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=030792;p=0

LIVER & KIDNEY SUPPORT & and several HERXHEIMER support links, too.
-

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Keebler
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SOUND ?

I hope that you are not sound sensitive. However, since so many with lyme are (to varying degrees), if you are, that is a very important matter to also address PRIOR to even setting foot in the hospital.

If so, start here but be aware that not all advice would be the same for someone with lyme. For instance, those with lyme may need to avoid sound moreso because of the serious neurological and also adrenal dysfunction.

Any kind of sound re-training can be disaster for those with lyme as opposed to those without it as a cause of hyperacusis. If someone on the hospital staff suggests you are being too protective, know that they don't know all there is about hyperaucis AND lyme together.

Audiologists, ENTs, and even neurotologists are not often aware of the differences for those with lyme and can offer very bad advice.

A Google search of: Hyperacusis, Hospital

might help but, just at a quick glance (I'm so out of steam) . . . I was disappointed as many authors have no clue of the unique ways hyperacusis differs for those with lyme.

One author said lyme certainly can cause hyperacusis but went on to talk about how many with it over-protect their ears and suggested sound re-training

(NOT good for those with lyme when sound HURTS . . . but there are two methods that may help, one from France (Tomatis Method), and a similar method from Mexico - but still, lyme is the driving force).

AIT, though, not a good idea. Auditory Integrative Training. Too harsh.

I'm telling you all this so that you can be prepared for well-meaing but uninformed advice you may get along the way to "just buck up."

If you have hyperacusis, I hope you have a hearing specialist who is LL and who can be your advocate for proper precautions while in hospital.

This would need to be laid out IN ADVANCE.

I don't see a specific link here for hospital, but a start.

http://www.hyperacusis.net/

HYPERACUSIS NETWORK
-

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Jane2904
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Ticked,

Our DD is s sens to many supplements , meds, FOODS etc. She has KPU, Lyme and Co. She also has MTHFR etc.

She ended up having to have emergency Gall bladder surgery back in 2011.

I was a nervous wreck, but all went fine.

List and discuss everything and do not be afraid to repeat. DD had different nurses etc and I made sure everyone had the correct info.

Please keep us posted and I wish you all the best and a complete recovery.

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Keebler
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Following Jane's DD's successful experience, it is MUCH easier these days than years earlier. Much easier with the laproscopic method.

Though, 3 days later, you may experience a lot of gas. I've not had gallbladder surgery but with a couple of others, no one told me in advance about the fact that all the gas they pumped into my belly was fighting to get back out and it took 3 days to reach its impatience level for escape !

For throat lozenges: THAYERS. After surgery, these will be very nice. Just not too many as they can cause loose bowels if taken continually.

Done with all the "just in case" notes so hope you already have your team in place and that it goes swimmingly well.

Look ahead for the land of happy tunes. Disney Land or Disney World? Either one sounds so fun. Swimming pools, Sunshine. Ahhh.
-

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Jane2904
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Keebler posted great info. She is also correct about the gas.

If you are able to walk around a bit that will help with the gas.

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Tammy N.
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Hi tickled. I did not read everyone's replies. But I wanted to share a thought.... have you worked with some excellent NDs or alternative practitioners to do gallbladder flushes (and liver flushes)? Also special supps for supporting the gallbladder? I'm wondering if your gallbladder can be saved.

In this regard, I do not trust regular doctors....and would lean on the gifted alternative docs. I would try to exhaust all efforts before surgery. Just my 2 cents. I know how hard these decisions are. Will be thinking of you. [group hug]

Wishing you well.

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Lymetoo
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I've heard that high doses of Vitamin C before and after surgery helps clear things out.

It's an easy surgery... at least I thought so. GOOD Luck!!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Carol in PA
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LED light therapy would speed your healing after the surgery.

If you can get treated with a professional model, that would be excellant.
You could call the hospital where you are scheduled and ask if they do this...the physical therapy department would likely know.


You can buy an LED light therapy unit for home use, which is not as strong but still VERY good.
I have the SOTA LightWorks, which uses LED's with wavelengths of 660 and 880.

660 is used for the skin, and the 880 wavelength penetrates about five inches into the body.
The LED's provide energy that the ATP in the cells can use, and wounds heal an estimated three times faster.

Just lay the light paddle on the skin at the surgery site, and let the unit run through a 30 minute cycle.
It reduces inflammation and pain.

When I used this on my cat's injuries, the swelling went down the same day, and wounds healed very quickly.
I used it on a family member's hernia surgical site, and he healed MUCH faster than the last time he had the surgery.
After seeing how well this works, I would never consent to surgery without it.


SOTA LightWorks
http://www.sota.com/lightworks.html
$325.00, includes shipping

You can google for a 10% discount code.
You can find vendors at Amazon.com and eBay, but it's usually more expensive than buying through the company.

I have no affiliation with this company.
I recommend their products because they work so well.

Posts: 6932 | From Lancaster, PA | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WPinVA
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I completely agree about listing all of your medical conditions and all of your supplements. It's so unfortunate that we are made to doubt ourselves for doing so!

I saw that you listed mitral valve prolapse. Please ask before the day of surgery about whether you should have prophylactic abx before/during the procedure. Many anesthesiologists don't want to make that kind of call - they want instructions from the cardiologist, which would need to happen prior to the day of surgery.

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tickled1
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I am feeling overwhelmed now. I live in a small town and there certainly aren't any naturopathic doctors on staff at the hospital where I will have surgery.

If all goes well I will only be staying one night so I don't think I will need to make any major demands of the staff.

I just want to get the whole thing over and done with. I'm thinking the main things that the doctors need to know about are probably the Chronic Lyme and Dysautonomia. I think I will leave CFS and Fibro out. May put possible MS or other unspecifed autoimmune disease. Will leave food allergies in.

I do know by the way that those aren't real diagnoses (Fibro/CFS) but those terms give doctors a general idea of what they may be dealing with. That being said though I don't want those labels if it may make them think I'm a hypochondriac or something.

There will be no more consults before the day of surgery next Wed. I bring the paperwork with me the morning of. I am really scared of going under and possibly not waking up.

I do appreciate everyone's input. Thank you so much!

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Tiramisu
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Not sure if already mentioned, but tell them not to give you steroids in your IV. Steroids = bad for Lymies.

I had mine out 3 years ago, and my recovery was a bit slow, but did NOT make me feel any worse with my symptoms. Wishing you a quick recovery!

Assuming you are avoiding fats now until surgery, start them back VERY slowly.

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lpkayak
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tickled-i didnt read all of above but my gallbladder surgery was the easiest one i had


i left hosp the next day and i think i bought a house a few days later...it was a 6 hr drive from where i was living. my nausea went away and i dont feel any different except better.

positive thoughts. good luck.

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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tickled1
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Had the surgery yesterday and everything went fine. I had an excellent Lyme Literate anesthisiologist just by chance if you can believe that and the hospital was wonderful accomodating all of my dietery restrictions. I'm now home and doing well!
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poppy
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Great news. I know how scary it can be to face surgery for the first time.
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tickled1
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Thanks poppy!
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Lymetoo
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Awesome!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Jane2904
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Great to hear!!! So happy all went well.
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tickled1
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Thank you!

You should have seen the look of shock on both mine and my husband's faces when the anesthisiologist started rambling on about how I probably still have Lyme from years ago and how persistant it can be and that most doctors would never admit that and then started listing certain supplements that would be beneficial for my low bp/POTS that were caused by the Lyme (in his words). We couldn't believe our ears!

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Tammy N.
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I have been thinking of you. So glad to hear it's behind you and all went well. That's great. Wishing you speedy recovery.

What a nice surprise to have a LL anesthesiologist like that. The Gods were watching over you:)

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tickled1
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Just thought I'd share that at my post-op follow-up today the surgeon said the pathology report showed "chronic cholecystitis".
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Keebler
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-
Well, glad you are rid of it and it seemed to have gone as well as it could.

Hope you are ready to rock 'n roll soon.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
OtterJ
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Tickled, if you get tired at Disneyworld or land, you could check out wheelchair options there. On the plus side, I am told that you don't have to wait in line if you are disabled. You could try day one walking and if you have problems the next day use some type of help.
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Keebler
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-
You might call today and talk with Disney staff about a "NAP ROOM" or a quiet place to rest.

I'm sure they have something like this and I'm sure you are not the only one who may enjoy this.

They may even have a way to send someone for you with a golf cart.

If they don't, ask if they have a MEDITATION ROOM or a chapel. You can like down ANYWHERE, even there.

I've tucked myself into many a back corner pew or back against a corner. I've even written notes to say "just resting" so others would not be alarmed (it has happened!).

By establishing a relationship before you even get there with a real person (be sure to get their name and make sure THEY are the contact for you with followup inquiries).

Same with the airline - not about a personal contact but arranging "wheelchair service" for each leg of your flight. You have to call ahead so that it's registered with your ticket number.

This will help tremendously and you do not have to be in the chair at all times, just when you need it.

But you have to check as you board each plane that the wheelchair assist will be waiting for you at the GATE upon plane arrival. Each time you change planes, check again.

STARTLE ALERT if you do this, though. Unless a relative or friend guides your chair - if an airport attendent does, they often have a loud "walkie talkie" on their belt -- right at your ear level. And that thing can blast. Be aware.

Have fun.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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