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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Do you treat MTHFR if vitamin levels are normal?

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Author Topic: Do you treat MTHFR if vitamin levels are normal?
LymeOverwhelmed
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Does anyone know if you should still treat MTHFR if folic acid and B vitamins are all normal levels? I'm positive for both mutations and took l-methylfolate and B12 as methylcobalimin but got very nauseous, dizzy, etc. Any info would be greatly appreciated!

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"If you are going through hell, keep going.

Lyme, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, and Babesia - great!
MTHFR, 10mm pineal cyst, ana 1:80, CD57 = 36

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tickled1
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Hmmm...not sure but back before I knew I had MTHFR my B12 and folate were elevated and it turns out that was probably b/c my body wasn't able to convert to the active form.
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Razzle
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How much l-methylfolate and methylcobolamin did you take? Many people start with too much.

When methylation is blocked by MTHFR and one starts to support methylation again, you can get what's known as a detox reaction.

This means the toxins the body could not get rid of before can now be mobilized and eliminated. Unfortunately, this can be uncomfortable.

Also, if you have SHMT or CBS mutations, you need to compensate for those first before compensating for MTHFR or any other methylation mutations.

It doesn't matter what your current level of B-vits or folic acid are. If you have the mutation, you need support for it.

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-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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beaches
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Razzle what do you mean that you have to compensate for the CBS or SHMT mutations first? Thanks.
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Tammy N.
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Any idea on how to lower the un-assimilated folate in the blood? Mine is very high (>24). I guess this means my cells are not able to absorb it?? I wonder how to get that to normalize, so its not just floating around. I hear its not good, just don't remember why.
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beaches
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Tammy, do you have the MTHFR genetic mutation? Not sure what you mean by "un-sssimilated folate"? What are your actual blood test results?

Not that I'm an expert by any means...just beginning to learn about all of this myself.

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Razzle
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Beaches,

There are about 30 SNP's that Dr. Yasko looks at that are involved with methylation.

MTHFR is only 3 of these SNP's. SHMT and CBS are other SNP's involved with the methylation cycle.

But the way the whole thing works, the SHMT and CBS mutations can actually cause more problems if one starts compensating for other SNP's first.

"Un-assimilated folate" = Folic Acid that has not been converted to the active form of Folate, or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate.


Tammy,

I wish I knew how to do that...mine is really high, too. I do know it is wise to avoid synthetic folic acid (fortified foods, supplements containing folic acid instead of folate).

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-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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tickled1
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Don't know how to lower it and don't know if mine is still high. If anyone finds out how please let me know! I do know we should avoid the non-methylated form-folic acid.
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n.northernlights
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wath this video here: http://mthfr.net
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Hopeny
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Its good to start with a REALLY low dose of MTHF-5. For my 9 YO I use less that 500 MCG, that's micrograms. for an adult I would start with 1 MG. BTW Niacin mops it up if you overdo it. Go low and slow with MTHF. Too much made my DD rage and her compulsions came back. I was giving her 5 MG daily. Now I give 1/10th of that every other day. good luck.
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Hopeny
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btw MTHF does not treat 1298. I have never been clear on how to treat 1298. If you only have one copy of 677T you need even less MTHF, there is approx. a 30% reduction as I understand in methylation with one copy, and up to 70% with two copies of 677T.
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Razzle
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Dr. Yasko recommends methylfolate for MTHFR A1298C, in addition to liver support and other stuff in basic methylation support list.

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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tickled1
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Razzle,

Any idea what Yasko recommends for homozygous C677T? Thanks

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LymeOverwhelmed
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Thanks so much for the info Razzle! I got that reaction from only 1 mg l-methylfolate and 1,000 mcg methylcobalamin. Do you think I should go lower? I haven't tried it again, I'm such a baby when it comes to all these reactions!

--------------------
"If you are going through hell, keep going.

Lyme, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, and Babesia - great!
MTHFR, 10mm pineal cyst, ana 1:80, CD57 = 36

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faithful777
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So for homozgous you still do folate and B12? I am heterozgous and that is what they prescribe for me.

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Faithful

Just sharing my experience, I am not a doctor.

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