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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Sleeping too much

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Author Topic: Sleeping too much
katrinab
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Qhat can cause sleeping too much? I have been in babesia treatment off and on for three years so idk if it's that. I sleep ten hrs a night, I wish I slept six or seven so I could get more done during the day
Posts: 723 | From boston,ma | Registered: Jan 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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Who determines what "too much" is. Sleep for however long your body requires. The ability to get more done is not the main purpose right now. Restoring your health is. If your body requires 10 hours a night, honor that. Even if more, even if 20 hours a day, honor that.

Adrenal support can help but, ultimately, during times of illness our body requires more sleep. Do not deny that key element. Try to embrace it and give your body that gift of rest (if that is possible).

When at my worst, I had to sleep about 20 hours day. Really. There was no way around that. It won't be forever but the more your body can rest as it needs, the better chance for improving.

Ten hours of sleep a night is very reasonable for this point in time. Be careful not to be pulled by any wish or to-do list. At the top of that To Do list: rejuvenate.

Don't judge, dismiss, deny the physical need. Our bodies heal during sleep. It's a good thing.
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GretaM
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Excellent advice, Keebler!

I love the to-do list.

Item 1: rejuvenate

Perfect [Smile]

Katrina-could be babesia flare-I've read of increased need for sleep with babesia. But also lyme can cause difficulty of waking up.

Personally, 10 hours sounds great! Don't beat yourself up for sleeping 10 hours a day. Listen to your body...our bodies instinctively know best.

[Smile]

Posts: 4358 | From British Columbia, Canada | Registered: Jun 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kat1777
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This has been the hardest part of this disease for me to deal with, having been so active prior to it. Most of the time, no amount of sleep truly refreshes me.

Some days I wish I could sleep for 20 hours. Alas, I have to work, I have to care for an elderly parent, I have pets that need to be walked, etc., etc.

Maybe I'd get better faster if I could sleep as much as I need, but what kind of a life is it really if you're sleeping it away? Not judging anyone, just thinking out loud.

For me, living a semi-normal life tired all the time trumps staying in bed all day, but it's not much of a choice, is it? Just know you're not alone. And heed the advice of others, if you can, when they tell you that it's not about how much you get done. Save the energy for the important stuff.

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randibear
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I go to bed at 8-9 and get up at 9-10. My doc increased the amitriptilin or elavil is the name crom 10 to 20. But I feel like an absolute zombie. I can keel over anytime and go to sleep. Feel like life is passing me by.

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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randibear,

Often, it's not so much the sleep that can create a zombie state as some kinds of sleep meds. I was a total zombie when I tried any of those in that family. So much better when they got out of my body, and better quality sleep.

They can be very hard on the liver (causing more fatigue, confusion and zoning out), too, and cause dry mouth (and dental disease from that) so the support around it very important.

From just this week's news:

------------------------------------

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/14/business/to-judge-sleep-aids-us-looks-at-drowsy-driving-in-the-morning.html?pagewanted=all

To Judge Sleep Aids, U.S. Looks at Drowsy Driving in the Morning

-by Katie Thomas - The New York Times - August 13, 2013

Excerpts:

. . . new evidence suggests what many people have long suspected: the effects of common prescription sleep aids like Ambien can persist well into the next day. Of particular concern is whether people who take the drugs before bed can drive safely the next morning.

Consumer advocates have warned for years about possible links between sleep drugs and car accidents. . . .

. . . part of a robust national conversation about how to cope with the throngs of drivers who take to roads every day under the influence of prescription drugs.

Law enforcement authorities have struggled with how to prosecute those who are impaired, especially when they have a prescription. A government survey in 2007 found that nearly 5 percent of daytime drivers tested positive for prescription or over-the-counter medications.

Doctors wrote close to 60 million prescriptions for sleep aids in the United States last year, according to the research firm IMS Health, but experts say testing how these drugs affect driving is not easy. . . .

. . . taking a closer look at all insomnia drugs on the market, and will ask manufacturers to conduct more extensive driving tests for all new sleep drugs. It will also more closely scrutinize any drug that causes drowsiness. . . .

. . . For years, traffic safety officials have called, without success, for a so-called “safe list” of drugs that do not affect driving. Some people react more strongly to drugs than others do, making it difficult to predict a person’s individual risk. . . .

. . . The attention has not been limited to insomnia drugs. In 2011, the F.D.A. approved the drug Horizant to treat restless leg syndrome after the drug makers, XenoPort and GlaxoSmithKline, conducted driving tests because the drug also causes drowsiness.

Horizant carries a warning against driving until patients know how the drug affects them, and notes that the effects could last until the morning after it is taken. . . .

- Full article at NYT link above.
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Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP & ADRENAL SUPPORT (for stable energy)
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
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i've tried melatonin, cordycep (sorry for spelling), you name it.

everything had the total opposite effect it was supposed to.

i ended up climbing the walls i was so hyper.

and man, ambien and lunesta, gave me horrific nightmares. i talked and thrashed so much my husband woke me up. never again...whew...bad stuff..

if i don't take something, i'm awake all night and just catnap for 10-15 minutes at a time.

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do not look back when the only course is forward

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GretaM
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Kat-i do understand your point about life passing you by if you stay in bed a large part of the day.

My problem is not having the option to stay in bed until I feel rested. Most days I am so busy with life, poor quality, exhausted life, that I yearn for the times when I could go to bed when tired, and wake up when rested.

Life is STILL passing me by...because my quality of life while being chronically exhausted sucks.

What I'd give for more flexible hours at my job, so I could sleep until rested.

Elavil...had horrible reaction with it. Turned me into a zombie, and I had the most awful rages and badtemper while on it. Only made it to 30mg, but quit because I was so angry all the time.

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Bitten in Bergen
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Sometimes it can be hard to say what specifically might be causing the fatigue.

I, too, have been treating babesia for a few years now.

However, sometimes my fatigue was not necessarily due to the babesia. I have also seen that my fatigue was caused by:
- going too quickly in the dosing (trying to do too much, too soon)
- candida overload
- dehydration

Posts: 348 | From NJ | Registered: Sep 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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