LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » do herbs cross the blood brain barrier

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: do herbs cross the blood brain barrier
LSG Scott
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 21624

Icon 1 posted      Profile for LSG Scott     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
just wondering if the wormwood, turmeric and andrographis i'm takeing could get to the brain

--------------------
LSG Scott

Posts: 488 | From Boston, Cape Cod, Mass | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Judie
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 38323

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Judie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Interesting questions...

I would think in tea form or tincture they might. The problem is molecule size.

That's why some antibiotics do cross and some don't.

This article talks about the blood brain barrier. It's an interesting article anyway even if it's not herb specific.

http://lymemd.blogspot.com/2013/03/blood-brain-barrier.html

"Antibiotics that cross the BBB tend to have certain physical characteristics including: small molecular size, being lipophilic, binding to fatty molecules on cell membranes, low plasma protein binding and other specialized characteristics."

Posts: 2839 | From California | Registered: Jul 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Carmen
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 42391

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Carmen     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
absolutley yes!
Posts: 802 | From USA | Registered: Oct 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
It depends upon the herb and sometimes, the form of that herb. Not all do and some may require a combination with another to do so.

Best to consult (or read works from) an ILADS educated LL ND who will understand the science of lyme (and all that goes with it), as well as the science of herbs, in relation to lyme's unique properties and requirements.

It's also not just about the herb but what is going on for YOUR body, right now. Many with lyme have "sticky blood" with elevated fibrinogen. That requires some assist so that any treatment can work better.

A LL ND would know that Prickly Ash Bark (or other options) can be of help in various ways to ease up blockage.

-
When considering herbal / nutritional / adjunct methods:

if at all possible - because each person & each case is different - it's best to consult with an ILADS-educated LL ND (lyme literate naturopathic doctor) (or similar) who has completed four years of post-graduate medical education in the field of herbal and nutritional medicine -

- and someone who is current with ILADS' research & presentations, past and present, and has completed the ILADS Physician Training Program (see: www.ilads.org )

Many LL NDs incorporate antibiotics (depending upon the licensing laws in their state). Some LLMDs and LL NDs have good working relationships.

When possible, it's great to have both a LLMD and LL ND and even better when they have a long-standing professional relationship.

-----------------------

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/2/13964

How to find an ILADS-educated LL:

N.D. (Naturopathic Doctor);

L.Ac. (Acupuncturist);

D.Ay. (Doctor of Ayurvedic Medicine);

D.O.M. (Doctor of Oriental Medicine);

D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy);

D.C. (Doctor of Chiropractic);

Integrative / Holistic M.D., etc.

Be aware that integrative doctors can have various levels of formal herbal &/or nutritional education, perhaps even just a short course. Do ask first. Some have learned on their own from experts in the field. There are many ways to acquire knowledge and most are eager to share basic details about their training. You want someone with a deep knowledge.

Some of the specialities above may not actually treat lyme yet, for things such as physical adjustments, it is just good that they are also LL, at least to some degree (to know never to suddenly twist the neck or spine).

Links to many articles and books by holistic-minded LL doctors of various degrees who all have this basic approach in common:

Understanding of the importance of addressing the infection(s) fully head-on with specific measures from all corners of medicine;

knowing which supplements have direct impact, which are only support and which are both.

You can compare and contrast many approaches.

BASIC HERBAL EDUCATIONAL & SAFETY links,

BODY WORK links with safety tailored to lyme patients,

LOW HEAT INFRARED SAUNA detail,

BIOPHOTON - BIONIC 880 (& PE-1) links, and

RIFE links.
-

[ 10-17-2013, 05:24 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Of the 3 you asked about, here are some links set for a couple. And others that come to mind. Hepapro's Allicin does cross the BBB. Andrographis, too. Still, it's best to have expert guidance by a LL ND (or similar).


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/119197?#000000

Topic: Garlic vs Allicin


Below, related to by not at all the same thing as Wormwood. If for Babesia, Wormwood is not enough. Artemisinin (as part of a combination) is best.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=118253;p=0

Artemesia / Artemisinin links here


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/119089?#000000

ANDROGRAPHIS paniculata - LINKS SET
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Not regarding lyme, in general:

From: The One Earth Herbal Sourcebook (Tillotson, et.al.)

http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/important-herbs/turmeric-root-curcuma-longa.html

TURMERIC ROOT (Curcuma longa)

Excerpt:

. . . SAFETY ISSUES: Due to mucin-reducing effects, do not use the concentrated extract (curcumin) or oil in high doses, especially if you have bile duct obstruction, gall stones, or stomach ulcers. Use turmeric as a spice freely. . . .


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=114478;p=0

lululymemom posted:

Buhner told me that Curcumin Xanthorhizza is best for Babesia, . . . .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LSG Scott
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 21624

Icon 1 posted      Profile for LSG Scott     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
many thanks guys

--------------------
LSG Scott

Posts: 488 | From Boston, Cape Cod, Mass | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rowingmom
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 41213

Icon 1 posted      Profile for rowingmom     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Buhner suggests both kudzu and japanese knotweed for brain inflammation, so I suppose they would also cross the BBB.

--------------------
13 yo DX PANS/Tourette's/Asperger's/ADHD treated for Igenex positive bartonella/IND lyme with 2 years of abx treatment. Weaned off abx April 2013 at 80% improvement. Continuing with Buhner bartonella/babesia protocols. Aug 2014 99% improvement.

Posts: 265 | From Canada, Ontario | Registered: Jul 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.