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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Fatigue

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Author Topic: Fatigue
VV
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Has anyone figured out which infection or what process is behind the often random fluctuation of body/mind fatigue?

I get spells that can last for hours/days/weeks but daily fluctuation of some sort is a constant.

Sometimes it seems post-exertional.

Posts: 922 | From Philadelphia | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GretaM
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Hi VV.

I haven't figured this out either.

Not sure what bacteria causes it.

All I know, it is NOT a neurotoxin symptom for me, as the fatigue does NOT improve with regular detox methods.

Whereas headaches, nausea, dizziness, agitation and depression always improve with detox methods for me. (The headaches improve, not the migraines).

I still can't figure out/track/pattern the fatigue.

I agree with you, it seems post exertional, or also if I have too much brain stimulation. Like driving in bad traffic, grocery shopping in a crowded store or vacuuming.

Mind you, vacuuming is so boring, it'd make anyone fatigued. Haha.

Posts: 4358 | From British Columbia, Canada | Registered: Jun 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
VV
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"All I know, it is NOT a neurotoxin symptom for me, as the fatigue does NOT improve with regular detox methods. "

This is something I have been confused about, as I have yet to see any direct relief from "herxheimer protocols" or detox strategies.

It seems any detox I do may only have cumulative effects, not immediate.

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sparklyholiday
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I don't know. :-( But I'd love to know because I have the exact same issue you do.
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Judie
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My doc says it's viruses. I have hypercoagulation and all the viruses associated with it in this article.

I was going to ask more details in my next visit. I'm very fatigued too.

http://drcharlescrist.net/Borreliosis/Hypercoagulation/

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ukcarry
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Yes, lots of disabling fatigue, with a pattern that is infuriatingly hard to track. Why do only some people with Lyme get it, i wonder?
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VV
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I've been dealing with it for two years and haven't really made a dent in it.

I used to fight it more, but that just caused lots of crashing. Sometimes it's as if there is an "invisible line" that I cross and takes me down later. There always seems to be a delay in the fatigue, but it is definitely related to exertion.

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Suebear
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I have been struggling with fatigue. I know for me by the time I work a full day and cook dinner, I am done for. I know I cross the "invisible line" and my joints go crazy. I crash as soon as I can and pray the weekend gets here soon.

I am fortunate to make it through most days at work before crashing.

I don't have any suggestions, just know that you are not alone. I agree that exertion causes more fatigue for me also.

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sparklyholiday
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quote:
Originally posted by Suebear:
I have been struggling with fatigue. I know for me by the time I work a full day and cook dinner, I am done for. I know I cross the "invisible line" and my joints go crazy. I crash as soon as I can and pray the weekend gets here soon.

I am fortunate to make it through most days at work before crashing.

I don't have any suggestions, just know that you are not alone. I agree that exertion causes more fatigue for me also.

Your story is my story!!!

In addition....

I have very little exercise tolerance. Sometimes, on days that I feel good, I will try to get some exercise in... and by the time I'm done exercising - I'm done for a few days.

My recovery time is very long and I am severely fatigued and achy for several days. :-(

That has improved slightly with treatment, but not much!

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LymeSwimmer
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Just throwing this out there for just another reference point.

My fatigue has been a lot better this past month or so after going onto an elimination diet and not eating wheat (or any other grain) and dairy over that time.

Actually, I feel so much better, that I think I have some sort of intolerance to one of those - not only have I lost some weight (which is good) but my chronic nasal/sinus stuffiness has gone away.

I also am no longer crashing into mind numbing fatigue after eating.

I get my ALCAT (food intolerance testing) results back at the end of this week so I am excited to see what it says.

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sparklyholiday
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That's great!

I went gluten free for about 3 months and saw no change. I did see a change in my digestion, so I try to go gluten free as much as possible...

But other than my digestion, it didn't change any of my other symptoms. I was kinda hoping for more drastic changes!! LOL

Let us know what your ALCAT tests say! Did your doctor do them or did you get it on your own? How much did (or will) it end up costing you?

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LymeSwimmer
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I ended up doing the ALCAT through a local ND who is nothing short of fantastic to work with.

They weren't comfortable charging MSRP, so it was $390 for the 200 food panel (plus $31 for the blood draw) - pricey, but not as bad as I thought it was going to cost me.

Will post up my results when I get them

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sparklyholiday
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Great, thanks! I used to work for a dr's office who did the ALCAT tests regularly on our patients (not processed through insurance) but wasn't sure of what the cost was.

And frankly, if you discover something that you had NO idea about - it's totally worth the money!

It's hard to try the elimination diet on 200+ foods!!!

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steve1906
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Lyme Disease Presenting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome:

http://www.cfids-cab.org/cfs-inform/Mycoplasma/shor07.pdf

--------------------
Everything I say is just my opinion!

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steve1906
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My fatigue, anxiety & depression lasted for about two years. For some it can be very debilitating, and it was for me.

As far as I know (Lyme fatigue) is not the same as (reg. fatigue). I believe it’s common with Lyme because we are using all our energy to battle the infections.

Some natural help:
1) Vitamin B12 and B complex vitamins. B vitamins play a critical role in beating chronic fatigue because the body uses them to metabolize energy. And since many people today suffer from B vitamin deficiency anemia, supplementing with B complex vitamins, and vitamin B12 in particular, can make all the difference in alleviating tiredness and sustaining high energy levels. (http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=3466)

Depending on the severity of someone's chronic fatigue, both subcutaneous (under the skin) and sublingual (under the tongue) forms of B12 are available, with the methylcobalamin variety offering the most benefits (http://www.naturalnews.com/032766_cyanocobalamin_vitamin_B-12.html). When taking B complex vitamins, be sure to take food-based types like MegaFood's Balanced B Complex (http://www.megafood.com/vitamin-formulas/balanced-b-complex), rather than synthetic B complex vitamins.

2) Trace minerals and concentrated mineral drops. Mineral deficiency is another common cause of chronic fatigue, as a mineral-deficient body lacks the ability to effectively regenerate cells and produce adequate energy. This is why regularly consuming the full spectrum of ionic trace minerals, which includes nutrients like magnesium, chromium, iron, and zinc, is vitally important for treating chronic fatigue.

Eating full-spectrum sea and minerals salts on a regular basis is one great way to ensure that you are getting enough trace minerals in your diet, as is taking concentrated mineral drop supplements like the kind sold by Trace Mineral Research (http://www.traceminerals.com). Taking a magnesium supplement like Peter Gillham's Natural Calm can also help alleviate symptoms of chronic fatigue. (http://www.calmnatural.com/)

3) Bee pollen. Considered by many to be the "perfect food," as it has a unique balance of beneficial enzymes, protein, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals, bee pollen is another excellent option for those who struggle with chronic fatigue. The synchronistic effect of bee pollen's multitude of nutrients can help alleviate both physical and intellectual tiredness, and provide lasting energy throughout the day. (http://www.cfnmedicine.com/Article/Bee-Pollen-Extends-Lifespan)

In his book Beating Cancer with Nutrition, Dr. Patrick Quillin, Ph.D., explains that bee pollen has long been used throughout history as "a superfood to restore energy and recuperative powers." Both royal bee jelly and propolis, which bees use to disinfect their hives before occupying them, are also beneficial for energy and health. (http://www.naturalpedia.com/book_Beating_Cancer_With_Nutrition.html)

4) Maca. Used medicinally for thousands of years, particularly in South America where it grows abundantly at high elevations, maca is another powerful "superfood" that normalizes hormones and boosts energy levels. Because it helps balance a variety of systems throughout the body, maca is quickly becoming a go-to treatment for many people trying to cure their chronic fatigue symptoms. (http://www.naturalnews.com/028782_maca_Incas.html)

Since maca is naturally rich in both B complex vitamins and trace minerals, it is no surprise that it helps boost energy levels. But even more than this, maca contains unique substances that stimulate the pituitary and hypothalamus glands, which in turn benefit the adrenal and thyroid glands. The proper functioning of these important glands, of course, is absolutely vital for maintaining healthy and optimal energy levels. (http://www.greenwillowtree.com/Page.bok?file=peruvianmaca.html)

5) Liposomal vitamin C. Vitamin C is another powerful energizing nutrient with amazing potential to eradicate chronic fatigue systems. But typical oral supplementation with ascorbic acid and other common forms of vitamin C can provide only limited benefits, as only a small amount of the vitamin C ends up being absorbed into the body, while the rest is eliminated.

But supplementing with liposomal vitamin C, which some say is the equivalent of getting high-dose intravenous vitamin C injections, can help significantly boost energy levels by encapsulating vitamin C in protective lipid layers and delivering it directly into the bloodstream (http://www.quantumbalancing.com/liposomalC.htm). Not only is liposomal C extremely inexpensive, but it is also very easy to make at home. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeU--wadrMY)

6) Iodine. A continuous onslaught of ionizing radiation and fluoride chemicals, combined with a lack of iodine-rich foods in the diet, has left many modern people grossly deficient in necessary iodine. And it is iodine deficiency that causes many of them to feel sluggish, perpetually tired, and devoid of energy.

http://www.naturalnews.com/041690_chronic_fatigue_natural_remedies_treatments.html

--------------------
Everything I say is just my opinion!

Posts: 3529 | From Massachusetts Boston Area | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SouthPaw
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Is your doctor keeping an eye on your thyroid?
Posts: 99 | From Cali | Registered: Dec 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
VV
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Yup. Thyroid is fine. T3 is in upper range and RT3 is moderate (not high).
Posts: 922 | From Philadelphia | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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