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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » instead of vomiting I sneeze. is this neuron damage?

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Author Topic: instead of vomiting I sneeze. is this neuron damage?
GretaM
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Hi.

So for the umpteenth time, I awoke today with terrible head pain and vertigo with nausea.

I've noticed the last then times this has happened, when I get the urge to vomit, right as I expect to vomit, I sneeze.

This "confusion" never happened before lyme.

When I would feel gross, I would vomit.

Now I just sneeze.

What is this? Why? Does this mean I have permanent damage in my brain that is confusing the reflex signals in my body?

I still get the copious saliva before, but instead of throwing up I sneeze.

[Frown]

Posts: 4358 | From British Columbia, Canada | Registered: Jun 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bigstan
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Could it be spring allergies?

--------------------
HERX is a Four Letter Word!

Posts: 716 | From If you're going through hell, keep going......Winston Churchill | Registered: Apr 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Judie
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Lots of saliva could be esophagus spasms. You'll feel a lot of chest pressure and some bile may come up. It does feel like nausea too.

I can just imagine with all that pressure and confused neurons it could trigger a sneeze, like light-induced sneezing (even though no one can seem to agree on what even causes that, but the theory is confused neurons).

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/looking-at-the-sun-can-trigger-a-sneeze/

"A sneeze is usually triggered by an irritation in the nose, which is sensed by the trigeminal nerve, a cranial nerve responsible for facial sensation and motor control. This nerve is in close proximity to the optic nerve, which senses, for example, a sudden flood of light entering the retina. As the optic nerve fires to signal the brain to constrict the pupils, the theory goes, some of the electrical signal is sensed by the trigeminal nerve and mistaken by the brain as an irritant in the nose. Hence, a sneeze."

I also learned a new term called:

snatiation - sneezing caused by fullness of the stomach

Maybe it has to do with this:

http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/michael.gregory/files/bio%20102/bio%20102%20lectures/nervous%20system/nervous1.htm

Medulla oblongata

The medulla controls vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure.

It also contains reflexes such as vomiting, coughing, sneezing, hiccupping, swallowing, and digestion.

Information that passes between the spinal cord and the rest of the brain must pass through the medulla. In the medulla, sensory and motor axons on the right side cross to the left side and axons on the left side cross to the right side. As a result, stimuli passing through from the left side of the body are sent to the right side of the brain and signals passing through from the right side of the brain stimulate the left side of the body.

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cleo
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When I started Rifampin and Doxy I had the same issue. I would get really nauseated and sneeze and the nausea would go away. I always though it had to do with the cranial nerves or vagal nerve.
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GretaM
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Yes!

Judie and cleo, sounds just like how it is. Thanks for the info.

BigStan-No, seasonal allergies have been good this year so far. (fingers crossed).

[group hug]

Posts: 4358 | From British Columbia, Canada | Registered: Jun 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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