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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » co- infetions etc dont exist accoring to CDC troll

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Author Topic: co- infetions etc dont exist accoring to CDC troll
hansemand
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Co- infections, bartonella from ticks dont exist!!!!!!!

In a new study from Wormser co-infections etc he finds that it is not in the literature- ergo dont exist.
They have to be stopped now.

Tuttlwe is trying to do something about it- Please promote the petition in Activism.

Abstract:
Chronic coinfections in patients diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease: a systematic literature review.
Lantos PM, Wormser GP.
The American Journal of Medicine, pii: S0002-9343(14)00476-8.
Online before print, 2014 Jun 11.


Purpose
The controversial diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease is often given to patients with prolonged, medically unexplained physical symptoms. Many such patients are also treated for chronic co-infections with Babesia, Anaplasma, or Bartonella in the absence of typical presentations, objective clinical findings, or laboratory confirmation of active infection. We have undertaken a systematic review of the literature to evaluate several aspects of this practice.

Methods
Five systematic literature searches were performed using Boolean operators and the PubMed search engine.

Results
The literature searches did not demonstrate convincing evidence of 1) chronic anaplasmosis infection, 2) treatment responsive symptomatic chronic babesiosis in immunocompetent persons in the absence of fever, laboratory abnormalities and detectable parasitemia, 3) either geographically widespread or treatment responsive symptomatic chronic infection with Babesia duncani in the absence of fever, laboratory abnormalities and detectable parasitemia, 4) tick-borne transmission of Bartonella species, or 5) simultaneous Lyme disease and Bartonella infection.

Conclusions
The medical literature does not support the diagnosis of chronic, atypical tick-borne coinfections in patients with chronic, nonspecific illnesses

[ 07-12-2014, 07:57 AM: Message edited by: hansemand ]

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hansemand

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Catgirl
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The worm is a moron.

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--Keep an open mind about everything. Also, remember to visit ACTIVISM (we can change things together).

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hansemand
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Yes.
The problem is that the Medical establishment will believe that this is science.

Please promote the petition.

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hansemand

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Lymetoo
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Total moron. After all, he IS a WORM.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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hansemand
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I believe that his publication should be seen for what it is; CDC trying to cover up the gigantic Medical scandal.

Wormser is just CDC´s puppet.

Unless they are stopped they will contnue to run us over.

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hansemand

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Robin123
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I have news for you - the sun and the moon don't exist either! What else doesn't exist? Water? Air? My keyboard?
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norcal
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Hogwash...........I could have used a really choice word instead.
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hansemand
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Please promote the Tuttle petition.
Will make a difference.

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hansemand

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Razzle
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Haven't these coinfections been found in ticks? So why wouldn't the same infections also be in people bitten by said ticks? [confused]

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-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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carriekaye
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He's not saying co-infections don't exists. He's saying that CHRONIC co-infections don't exist... just like chronic lyme doesn't exist.

The conclusion is obviously ridiculuous. He saying that because it hasn't been studied, it doesn't exist.

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Lymetoo
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They're stupid.

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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hansemand
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Yes stupid- but effective.
If noone protests the results are going to become the truth.Sign the Tuttle petition and mail it to friends and Family.There have to more than 22.300 people suffering because of CDC n onsense.

[ 07-12-2014, 07:58 AM: Message edited by: hansemand ]

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hansemand

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hansemand
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up

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hansemand

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hansemand
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up

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hansemand

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SickSci
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Well said, carriekae. The first paragraph of the discussion actually sounds very reasonable/concilliatory... true but misleading.

But the paper is a pretty thin metaanalysis - only one search engine was used (pubMed)?! Just a half hour on scholar can turn up papers they seemed to have overlooked.

If people have access to publications, I urge you to try and read the paper and find rebuttal evidencce before dismissing it. We have to be objective.

We can try to get rebuttal comments formally submitted.

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- Working Dx: Protozoa x3, Bartonella
- Tx: Biaxin, Mycobutin, Ivermectin, boluoke, serapeptase, allimed, silver ACS 200 spray, Mg, Iodoral, fish oil, Vit's B, C, D, NAC, etc

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'Kete-tracker
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I think they're trying to say that CHRONIC co-infections "don't exist".
Remember- If you've been on a strong abx, like Biaxin, for a LONG time... say, 60 days, any leftover symptoms are all in your head!

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hansemand
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up

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hansemand

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hansemand
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congress com. today passed what is going to become a law about lyme and co.A step in the right direction.
Please support the ongong truggle by signing the Tuttle petition.

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hansemand

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KarlaL
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I think that he may be right about the fact that there is no evidence that anaplasmosis in humans is resistant to antibiotic treatment (ie chronic). I have heard the same from LLMDs. The same is not true for dogs, who can have chronic anaplasmosis infections.

There are a couple of new studies, published after Dr Wormser published his literature search, which demonstrate that bartonella infection in humans may be common and a mechanism by which bartonella may be transmitted by ticks. I know other similar studies have been published as well, but I do not have the references handy. That fact that so many vets have bartonella probably stems from the fact that they are exposed to a lot of cats, who are known carriers of bartonella. If bartonella is this common, then who is to say that chronically ill Lyme patients can't have bartonella, whether they got it from cat scratches, fleas, or ticks.

The enhanced Bartonella PCRs (which look for Bartonella DNA) used in the first study are available to patients: http://www.galaxydx.com/web/

Galaxy Diagnostics offers one of the best, most sensitive direct-detection Bartonella tests in the country. The Galaxy Diagnostics test screens for multiple Bartonella species. Unfortunately NYS residents will have to go to an out-of-state doctor and give an out-of-state address in order to get the test

Detection of Bartonella Species in the Blood of Veterinarians and Veterinary Technicians: A Newly Recognized Occupational Hazard?
Lantos, Paul M., Maggi, Ricardo G., Ferguson, Brandy, Varkey, Jay, Park, Lawrence P., Breitschwerdt, Edward B., and Woods, Christopher W.
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. August 2014, 14(8): 563-570.

http://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2013.1512


Abstract

Background: Bartonella species are important emerging pathogens in human and veterinary medicine. In the context of their daily activities, veterinary professionals have frequent animal contact and arthropod exposures. Detection of Bartonella spp. using traditional culture methods has been limited by poor sensitivity, making it difficult to determine the prevalence of infection in this population. We have developed a detection method combining enrichment culture and molecular amplification, which increases testing sensitivity.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of detectable Bartonella spp. in the blood of veterinary personnel and nonveterinary control subjects. Bartonella was detected by enrichment blood culture with conventional PCR followed by DNA sequencing. Results were correlated with epidemiological variables and symptoms.

Results: We detected DNA from at least one Bartonella species in 32 (28%) of the 114 veterinary subjects. After DNA sequencing, the Bartonella species could be determined for 27 of the 32 infected subjects, including B. henselae in 15 (56%), B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in seven (26%), B. koehlerae in six (22%), and a B. volans–like sequence in one (4%). Seventy percent of Bartonella-positive subjects described headache compared with 40% of uninfected veterinarians (p=0.009). Irritability was also reported more commonly by infected subjects (68% vs. 43%, p=0.04).

Conclusions: Our study supports an emerging body of evidence that cryptic Bartonella bloodstream infection may be more frequent in humans than previously recognized and may induce symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the natural course and clinical features of Bartonella infection.

http://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2013.1512


IrSPI, a Tick Serine Protease Inhibitor Involved in Tick Feeding and Bartonella henselae Infection.
Liu XY, de la Fuente J, Cote M, Galindo RC, Moutailler S, et al. (2014)
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 8(7): e2993.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002993

Abstract

Ixodes ricinus is the most widespread and abundant tick in Europe, frequently bites humans, and is the vector of several pathogens including those responsible for Lyme disease, Tick-Borne Encephalitis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis and bartonellosis. These tick-borne pathogens are transmitted to vertebrate hosts via tick saliva during blood feeding, and tick salivary gland (SG) factors are likely implicated in transmission. In order to identify such tick factors, we characterized the transcriptome of female I. ricinus SGs using next generation sequencing techniques, and compared transcriptomes between Bartonella henselae-infected and non-infected ticks.

High-throughput sequencing of I. ricinus SG transcriptomes led to the generation of 24,539 isotigs. Among them, 829 and 517 transcripts were either significantly up- or down-regulated respectively, in response to bacterial infection. Searches based on sequence identity showed that among the differentially expressed transcripts, 161 transcripts corresponded to nine groups of previously annotated tick SG gene families, while the others corresponded to genes of unknown function.

Expression patterns of five selected genes belonging to the BPTI/Kunitz family of serine protease inhibitors, the tick salivary peptide group 1 protein, the salp15 super-family, and the arthropod defensin family, were validated by qRT-PCR. IrSPI, a member of the BPTI/Kunitz family of serine protease inhibitors, showed the highest up-regulation in SGs in response to Bartonella infection.

IrSPI silencing impaired tick feeding, as well as resulted in reduced bacterial load in tick SGs. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of I. ricinus SG transcriptome and contributes significant genomic information about this important disease vector. This in-depth knowledge will enable a better understanding of the molecular interactions between ticks and tick-borne pathogens, and identifies IrSPI, a candidate to study now in detail to estimate its potentialities as vaccine against the ticks and the pathogens they transmit.

http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0002993

Free, full text of this Open Access article (pdf file, 1.1 MB):
http://www.plosntds.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0002993&representation=PDF
or http://tinyurl.com/kbtc88z

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KarlaL

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