LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Yeast research: might ibuprofen have anti-fungal effects on candida?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Yeast research: might ibuprofen have anti-fungal effects on candida?
Sonatina
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 45056

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sonatina     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
According to these abstracts, possibly...
[these were in vitro studies]

See:

Antifungal activity of ibuprofen alone and in combination with fluconazole against Candida species.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10966233?log$=activity

Potent synergistic effect of ibuprofen and azoles on Candida resulting from blockade of efflux pumps...
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16115827?log$=activity

This isn't an exhaustive list. Do a search on Pubmed for "ibuprofen and candida" for more.

P.S. Please do not use this as a basis for deciding to take ibuprofen. Consult your physician! I'm not a healthcare professional. Thanks.

[ 12-21-2014, 04:06 PM: Message edited by: Sonatina ]

--------------------
Please consult your physician before making any changes to your diet, medications, or supplements. I am not a healthcare professional and nothing I write should be construed as medical advice.

Posts: 166 | From USA | Registered: Dec 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5230

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lpkayak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I HOPE SO!!!!!

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sonatina
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 45056

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sonatina     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I also found this study on hamsters (see below), which came to the opposite conclusion, so it's a confusing picture.

[Diminution of antifungal activity of fluconazole associated with ibuprofen and piroxicam in experimental histoplasmosis of hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12716230

--------------------
Please consult your physician before making any changes to your diet, medications, or supplements. I am not a healthcare professional and nothing I write should be construed as medical advice.

Posts: 166 | From USA | Registered: Dec 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Ibuprofen is very hard on the kidneys. Best to avoid it as much as possible.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Ibuprofen constricts blood flow. This can pose problems in various ways for the kidneys and other organs, as well as contribute to hearing damage.

http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/analgesicnephropathy/

National Kidney & Urulogic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC)

Analgesic Nephropathy (Painkillers and the Kidneys)

Excerpts:

. . . Analgesic use has been associated with two different forms of kidney damage: acute renal failure and a type of chronic kidney disease called analgesic nephropathy. . . .

. . . Some patient case reports have attributed incidents of sudden-onset acute kidney failure to the use of over-the-counter painkillers, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen sodium. . . .

. . . A second form of kidney damage, called analgesic nephropathy, can result from taking painkillers every day for several years. . . . .

. . . Ibuprofen may also increase the risk of chronic kidney damage, . . .


http://www.nytimes.com/1990/04/16/us/kidney-peril-found-in-the-pain-reliever-ibuprofen.html

Kidney Peril Found in the Pain Reliever Ibuprofen

(AP) April 16, 1990 – The New York Times

Excerpts:

The popular pain reliever ibuprofen can cause kidney failure in people with mild kidney disease, according to a new study.

A three-year study on the drug was reported today in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. . . .

. . . gave participants above-normal doses of 800 milligrams of ibuprofen three times a day - the equivalent of 12 ibuprofen tablets - for up to 11 days.

After eight days, three women developed kidney failure, which reversed when ibuprofen was discontinued. The remaining nine women, who received ibuprofen for 11 days, showed changes in kidney function but did not develop kidney failure.

After recovering, the three women were given 400 milligrams of ibuprofen three times a day, equivalent to normal doses of the drug.

Two of the three again developed kidney failure but recovered when the ibuprofen was stopped.

Ibuprofen relieves pain by interfering with the body's production of prostaglandin, a substance involved in inflammation. But at the same time, the drug constricts blood flow.

Normally, the change poses little risk if used for a short period.

But for those whose blood flow to the kidneys is already reduced by kidney, heart or liver damage, flu, or aging, ibuprofen could lead to acute kidney failure. . . .

- Full article at link above.


http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/link-between-pain-relievers-and-hearing-loss

Pain Relievers and the Risk of Hearing Loss

- By Sharon G. Curhan, MD - 10/09/2012
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
That blood vessel constriction of ibuprofen is also a concern with the heart.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-22694858

Common painkillers 'pose heart risk'

- By James Gallagher, Health and science reporter, BBC News - 29 May 2013
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sonatina
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 45056

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sonatina     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
All drugs have potential adverse effects, including all of the antifungal drugs, all antibiotics, and every type of NSAID.

If a patient has a fungal infection, letting it go untreated also has potential consequences, however.

And the options for treating fungal infections are far more limited than for bacterial infections.

Here's where a doctor has to weigh the potential risks against the potential benefits of any treatment decision.

--------------------
Please consult your physician before making any changes to your diet, medications, or supplements. I am not a healthcare professional and nothing I write should be construed as medical advice.

Posts: 166 | From USA | Registered: Dec 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
NSAIDs are not a good idea to take for many reasons.

Why risk heart damage, having to go on dialysis due to kidney failure - or deafness - to take ibuprofen for candida when there ARE safer options?

Some of the damage from ibuprofen can happen down the road, too. It's not always immediate but can be.

As a rule, it's never a good idea to take anything that causes blood vessel constriction - body wide as does ibuprofen.

This is not a potential side effect (but a dangerous method of action). It always happens with ibuprofen. It's what it does. And it's not good for anyone.

There are dozens of safer ways to approach fungal infections. Generally, whatever approach, it will take months, or on-going attention. So, especially then, ibuprofen would bring profound risks.

In those who are ill, the liver & kidneys are already strained. Adding blood vessel constriction to that can be a dangerous recipe.
.

[ 12-21-2014, 08:14 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
One particular brand of Olive leaf extract cured decades' old candida infection for me (along with a wise diet of only whole foods no gluten or dairy, yet one that could include low glycemic berries).

After decades of various antibiotics for all manner of respiratory infections having set me up with systemic candida, off of abx for a few years, I was able to clear candida with diet and various other herbal formulas & rounded out with OLE toward the time I saw success - finally.

(But some methods were way too harsh such as caprylic acid and even oregano oil UNLESS in a GEL CAP but that was never as effective as OLE for me. I will never, ever take caprylic acid again. What torture for me in various ways -- just in case others might be having that same reaction. PROBIOTICS were important but not enough, alone, in my case).


Yet, at a later time, I also took OLE at the same time as a 2-month course of doxycycline - so I know it really works to prevent candida, too. It was a dream come true for me.

The key, I believe, was starting the OLE a few days PRIOR to starting the new antibiotic.

OLE is just one of dozens of approaches of which naturopathic doctors are aware.

OLE caused me no side effects at all, only helped improve several other symptoms at the same time it clobbered candida.

Some brands of OLE may not have the best results (Seagate has a particularly excellent extraction method and quality control), however, and the dose needs to be started slowly - otherwise there can be a die-off.

Die-off is not to be confused with side-effects, however, and can be managed by dose modulation.

If even the best quality OLE is not a good match for a particular person, though, as individual response can vary, there are still dozens of other options. Dozens. The "How to Find a LL ND" thread here leads to other avenues.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/115457?#000000

OLE (Olive Leaf Extract) Links
-

[ 12-21-2014, 08:03 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Another good option for candida management

(although I have no personal experience as all candida issues were solved for me before I started Berberine - I find it helps me in many ways - and is absolutely remarkable as pain relief as it lessens inflammation in my case - but the literature on it reads as promising as an anti-fungal, too).


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=121034;p=0

BERBERINE – LINKS SET
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
VV
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 38828

Icon 1 posted      Profile for VV     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This study calls into question claims made by both of you:

http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/ibuprofen-use-could-extend-lifespan/ar-BBh0apV

Posts: 922 | From Philadelphia | Registered: Sep 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I've said nothing in support of ibuprofen. And I question that article above. There are so many serious consequences with ibuprofen that are not considered there.

Came back to add this about tinnitus. So many with lyme have tinnitus & vertigo. Ibuprofen is very ototoxic. So adding that to the mix can cause more torture and risks damage.

http://hearinglosshelp.com/weblog/advil-ibuprofen-and-temporary-hearing-loss.php

Q: Advil (Ibuprofen) and Temporary Hearing Loss

by Neil Bauman, Ph.D. - December 10, 2008
Excerpt:

. . . Sometimes all it takes is to stop taking an ototoxic medication and your ears return to normal.

Ibuprofen (Advil) is one such drug. In some people, Ibuprofen can cause temporary hearing loss and other ear problems that return to normal when they stop taking this drug. You appear to be one of them.

However, don’t bet the farm that the ototoxic side effects will always be temporary. I have heard from people who took Ibuprofen and have had tinnitus ever since as a result. Thus you still want to be careful with this drug.

In addition to hearing loss Ibuprofen (Advil) can cause tinnitus, dizziness, nystagmus and vertigo. A lot of people don’t realize that Ibuprofen is quite so ototoxic. . . .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5230

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lpkayak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I cant walk without ibuprofen. I have cut it in half by using fish oil and curcumin but have not figured out how to stop it. I really want to. It gives me reflux so i need reflux meds and i know they are responsible for me haing more bugs...but it is a big change to be "in and out of wc, and walker and canes" to being totally wc bound. I live alone. My house is not wc friendly. 1200 mg a day and i can walk a lot of the time. Without it by the third day i really cant take one step without support

Ive been taking it about 30 yrs. Ive never had a bad kidney or liver test. Recently there seems to be positive research coming out

If i lost my legs i guess id have to be wc bound but if two pills a day can keep me out of wc im.gonna go with that for now

I keep looking for more anti inflam supps too

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5230

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lpkayak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
All our bodies are different

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13712 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sonatina
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 45056

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Sonatina     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The conclusions & findings I posted are those of the authors who performed the studies, not my own. Some had contradictory findings so it doesn't seem there is a clear answer regarding ibuprofen.

Candida infections run the gamut from minor & localized to fungemia with invasive candidiasis and multi-organ involvement.

Some treatment approaches may be well-suited to overgrowths which are primarily local to the vagina, mouth, or GI tract; others may be required for fungemia & more serious/invasive disease with organ involvement, where the treating agent needs to attain therapeutic levels throughout the body. And often a patient may have other infections concurrently which can influence the choice of treatments.

So I don't think it's an either/or scenario here. All possible therapies for candida may be useful for certain infections, depending on the patient's medical picture.

As for adverse effects of ibuprofen, that is true of every NSAID and every single antimicrobial drug out there (and some herbs too). If you look at some of the adverse effects of antifungal drugs like Amphotericin B or voriconazole, for example, then the risk profile of ibuprofen starts to seem more favorable.

--------------------
Please consult your physician before making any changes to your diet, medications, or supplements. I am not a healthcare professional and nothing I write should be construed as medical advice.

Posts: 166 | From USA | Registered: Dec 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.