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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » cipro and no side effects??

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Author Topic: cipro and no side effects??
randibear
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has anybody taken cipro and not had side effects? my doc has given me cipro and flagyl for my diverticulitis attack but all I hear is horrible stories about it. he said he is out of drugs to treat me with because of my negative reactions to just about everything.

I can tolerate high doses of flagyl. I asked for doxy but he said its ineffective and I'm allergic to sulfas.

cipro is my last resort.

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kimmie
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Look up lauricidin. It's a natural antibiotic and the reviews on Amazon are great for diverticulitis as well as Lyme.
Posts: 747 | From Utah | Registered: Apr 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kimmie
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It's derived from the active ingredient in virgin coconut oil, useful against many infections including Lyme based on my research. Something to probably stay with if it works to prevent future diverticulitis attacks. Says it can cause die off, herx or diarrhea but has anti c difficle properties.
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TF
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I took cipro about 2 weeks ago. I had no side effects.
Posts: 9931 | From Maryland | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
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Can you just eat a spoon of coconut oil?

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kimmie
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Virgin coconut oil is Very antibacterial There is actually a book, Coconut Cures: Preventing and Treating Common Health Problems with Coconut
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randibear
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Can you just eat a spoon of coconut oil?

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
gz
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This is what Bruce Fife, the author of Coconut Cures: Preventing and Treating Common Health Problems with Coconut, has to say about it:

"The predominate fatty acids in coconut oil are �medium chain� fatty acids. There are three medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs): lauric acid, capric acid, and caprylic acid.

There are also three monoglycerides formed during digestion: monolaurin, monocaprin, and monocaprylin. All three of the medium chain fatty acids and medium chain monoglycerides possess antimicrobial properties; triglycerides and diglycerides do not.

In general, monolaurin has demonstrated the strongest effect in killing many bacteria, viruses, and fungi. This has led manufacturers to start producing and marketing monolaurin as an antimicrobial dietary supplement.

Some of these producers claim that when coconut oil is digested, only a small amount of the oil is converted into monolaurin, and therefore, monolaurin or Lauricidin� is more effective than coconut oil as an antimicrobial agent.

In fact, some go so far to say that since coconut oil produces so little monolaurin, it is not really effective in fighting infections. This is not true.

Of the three medium chain fatty acids, lauric acid has shown to be more potent than capric and caprylic acids in killing many microorganisms. Monolaurin, likewise, has shown to be more effective than the other monoglycerides as well as the MCFAs.

But this is a broad generalization. There are certain organisms in which monolaurin is not the most effective, while the other monoglycerides or fatty acids work better. You would do better using monocaprin or capric acid on some microorganisms than you would monolaurin. The same is true with all the other fatty acids and monoglycerides.

Monolaurin is a single ingredient. Coconut oil, on the other hand, is a combination of 10 different fatty acids�short, medium, and long�and their monoglycerides, most all of which possess antimicrobial properties. Each one has its strengths and advantages. When combined together they work synergistically to enhance the effectiveness of the total.

Therefore, coconut oil with its 10 fatty acids and 10 monoglycerides has greater potential for fighting infection. In my opinion, coconut oil, as nature made it, is superior to monolaurin alone."

from http://coconutresearchcenter.org/hwnl_5-5.htm

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Judie
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I could tolerate high doses of mepron and malarone together and could not tolerate levaquin (levaquin and cipro work the same).

The damage isn't the same as a side effect, it's an adverse drug reaction.

It's a time bomb with fluoroquinolones and there's no way to know how fast you'll reach the threshold and have DNA damage.

Magnesium in high doses did not prevent the damage I'm dealing with now.

The persistent adverse reactions from cipro aren't worth the risk. I couldn't walk after taking my 8th dose of levaquin. I was that way for 2 months after that and being crippled. It's still a struggle to get around.

Tendons are still breaking and it's been months since I took the drug. I'm not on here as much because of the tendon damage I have in my hands from it.

2013 FDA Warning about Fluoroquinolone antibiotics causing PERMANENT damage
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=130342;p=0

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Judie
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Some of these people took cipro for diverticulitis. You can see if the risk is worth it for you.

http://www.askapatient.com/viewrating.asp?drug=19537&name=CIPRO

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Judie
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"My doc said it's minimal out of the millions of prescriptions written."

I'm sorry, but your doctor is wrong on that one. There's now another class action lawsuit against these drugs.

My doctor was clueless too. The Lyme Doc never even saw the FDA warnings I posted above until I brought them into the office a month ago.

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randibear
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Oh god....i'll stock up on magnesium and glucosamine. They're supposed to help right?

Is there treatment cfor the damage? I pray for all those affected

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do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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