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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » treatment for hyperthyroidism?

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Author Topic: treatment for hyperthyroidism?
jlcd1
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anyone hyper on here? Thanks
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VV
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I think if it is bad enough, thyroidectomy is the treatment.
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Keebler
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Let's put the brakes on for a minute and get a little more detail. You have another thread:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/131140#000000

13 February, 2015

Topic: borderline hyperthyroidism?

What do people do for this if your having symptoms? Anxiety, heart palpitations, sweating constantly, mustle weakness. I know that all this can be TBD as well but i think some of it may be thyroid. Thanks (end jlcd1 post)
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Keebler
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So, it sounds like you have not been diagnosed with this but have the symptoms.

And that the symptoms can also be due to tick borne disease.

So, your LLMD would be the best to ask about this for a variety of reasons.

1. Specific thyroid tests with a lab they trust can help sort it out. It's important that a LLMD order and also evaluate the tests as - with lyme & co - there are some specifics that most regular doctors are not aware of due to lyme / TBD.

A physical exam of your neck / throat / thyroid gland and perhaps IMAGING of some kind may be important to rule out a growth or thickening.


2. If your thyroid is determined to be "hyper" there are so many questions to sort out form diet, to Rx, OTC, herbals, infections, inflammation . . .

and also interventions to consider before any drastic measures would even enter the conversation.

3. Even a diagnosis of hypo or hyper thyroid may not actually be what it appears, depending upon the lab methods. A LLMD is best to talk about this and also a LL ND because there are so many options that a LL ND knows about.

4. ADRENAL issues also need to be considered, big time. The chapter below speaks to Yin / Yang overdrive & deficiency.

And those kind of imbalances [whether referenced in terms of Western or Chinese medicine] also go hand in hand with adrenal deficiency. And hand in hand with lyme / TBD as lyme / TBD greatly affect our entire hormonal system.

You need a LLMD / LL ND who understands the adrenal connection to the symptoms you are experiencing.
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[ 02-19-2015, 08:04 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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From "The One Earth Herbal Sourcebook" [Tillotson, et.al.]

http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/diseases/hyperthyroidism.html

Hyperthyroidism

Symptoms . . .

Herbal Treatment of Hyperthyroidism

. . . It is difficult to express how grateful patients in danger of losing their thyroid glands are when they discover herbs can prevent this.

However, while the inflammation of the thyroid can sometimes (not always) be calmed down, the secondary problem of eye inflammation (Grave's ophthalmopathy) is another matter. . . .
. .

• Research note: A study of 89 cases of hyperthyroidism and 20 cases of hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto's thyroiditis were analyzed via blood tests to check for correlation with TCM differentiations.

In patients with Yin deficiency, the T3 and T4 hormone levels were higher than normal, and the TSH lower than normal.

In patients with Yang deficiency, the T3 and T4 hormone levels were lower than normal, and the TSH higher than normal.

This study showed that the TCM differentiations were almost exactly correlated with Western diagnosis (Chen et al., 1990).

[TCM is Traditional Chinese Medicine]


http://www.itmonline.org/arts/thyroid.htm

Treatments for Thyroid Diseases with Chinese Herbal Medicine

by Subhuti Dharmananda, Ph.D

Excerpts:

. . . Blood-vitalizing herbs are especially indicated when the thyroid mass is quite firm; this is a characteristic of thyroid tumors which can also cause hyperthyroidism (toxic adenoma).

Hyperthyroidism is thought by some doctors to start with an excess fire syndrome which later becomes yin-deficiency fire. Therefore, fire-purging herbs are used, especially in the early stages of the disease process. . . .

. . . Several hyperthyroid symptoms, such as heart palpitation, general hyperactivity (psychological and physical),

excessive perspiration,

heightened appetite, aversion to heat, and, in more severe cases,

wasting of the muscles, are characteristic of a yin deficiency syndrome . . . .
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Keebler
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Some articles here that encompass more about our hormonal system than just adrenal [and you can also springboard to thyroid detail from some of the same authors.

The Wilson adrenal book is linked here. In that, if you happen to have it, see page 236 for the Thyroid - Adrenal Connection.

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP & ADRENAL SUPPORT
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Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=123746;p=0

Topic: MAGNESIUM - Informational Links set

Many of the symptoms you describe can be due to magnesium deficiency. You might want to look at (or review) some of the articles in this set.

Sweating constantly can be due to hyperthyroid must be sure to consider, or in addition to:

(has babesia been assessed? histamine reaction? wearing any new clothes that are synthetic or chemically treated to be wrinkle resistant, new body lotions or soaps, etc.?)
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VV
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Keebler,
Do you ever get tired of posting that MAGNESIUM link? You post it for every other question here on Lymenet, and honestly it rarely seems relevant.

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Keebler
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VV,

Oh, magnesium is usually relevant. And you just never know if someone has that detail or maybe just does need to read back over it. There are many articles and sometimes something new to it, too.

Magnesium can be life saving.

Skip it if you don't want to read it. This is not your thread. I've learned not to post it for you. Relax.
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Keebler
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jlcd1,

In addition to the basic articles in the Magnesium Links set, be sure to Google:

magnesium, thyroid

one of several promising search results from that includes:

http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/2010/05/19/magnesium/

Stop the Thyroid Madness

My discovery of why our MAGNESIUM levels are a huge problem! (mine was)

By Janie Bowthorpe, M.Ed. - May 19, 2010
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Keebler
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http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/

Stop the Thyroid Madness - website


http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/book2_authors/janie-bowthorpe-m-ed/

Janie A. Bowthorpe, M.Ed. [Master of Education]

[Also an] Editor, [she] is a thyroid patient activist, author, editor, website owner, blogger and speaker.

She stepped into her activism when her life made a huge turnaround after twenty years of a T4-only, Synthroid nightmare.

Her website [above] is one of the most visited thyroid websites in the world.

Her revised patient-to-patient book, Stop the Thyroid Madness: a Patient Revolution Against Decades of Inferior Thyroid Treatment, is one of the most sought-after thryroid treatment books in the world, translated into many languages.

------
Search Amazon for the book "Stop the Thyroid Madness I" (2011)

you can read 282 customer reviews, average 4.5 stars.

http://www.amazon.com
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[ 02-19-2015, 12:44 AM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/stop-thyroid-madness-ii/

STOP THE THYROID MADNESS II: How Thyroid Experts are Challenging Ineffective Treatments and Improving the Lives of Patients (2014)

Author detail, each with a short bio and link to their website.

Scroll down, past authors' photos to see the chapter layout and each chapter author

The title can also be searched at Amazon, where there are 23 reader reviews, average 4.9 stars
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VV
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Keebler,

My concern is that your magnesium a hammer and every ailment to you is a nail.

It's not a panacea, it's just one of many nutrients needed in the body.

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Keebler
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VV,

Don't be concerned. But, also, it need not be protested. I'm rather tired of your repeated complaints to my including this where I see it important.

I'm tired of having to explain & defend so often to your protests. Please stop the bombardment.

Actually, the explaining is in the article sets, and the way it works - or can't when we are low - is really a captivating process.

If you are tired of seeing it, look away.

Never, ever, do any of my posts suggest only magnesium in one's assessment / plan. But it does need to be at the top.

For others who do post situations where this is entirely relevant, where this may be an important first question (and one that requires some revisiting),

magnesium remains - always - an important consideration. Deficiency can cause pain, neurological issues, even death. Important to learn all we can about this.

The articles also address other nutrients and balance. I hope that will put your complaints to rest.

It's actually rather complex learning about the different kinds of magnesium, the reason it must be divided doses, optimum dosing, etc.

By the way, the first two symptoms mentioned in the question posed here are: Anxiety, heart palpitations . . .

The first thing that should be asked really is about magnesium levels. Low magnesium can be at the root of both (even if there are other considerations as well).

And the right kind of magnesium supplementation can often help to resolve such symptoms (even if there are co-issues on board).
-

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VV
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Keebler,

Forgive me if I misunderstood, but I do believe online forums to be (ideally) a platform for large discussions, and are not particularly meant for extensive monologues, as at the least it diminishes the quality of conversation, given that your posts are remarkably unconversational, rigid and lecturing in tone.

In my opinion, your information would be more useful on its own website or a blog. You wouldn’t have to write it thousands of times over, it would be more organized, and people would know to expect one voice.

I would visit a “keeblers_corner.net”.


**edited rude comments**

[ 02-19-2015, 10:28 PM: Message edited by: Lymetoo ]

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Keebler
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VV,

Just because information has appeared for other posters, that does not mean when questions are asked by a different poster, they don't deserve full attention to detail that may well be very helpful to them, on their own thread.

Each time I contribute to a reply, there is consideration as to if what I have to share could be valuable to that person, at that point in time . . . so they have a start to their own set of study notes and reference sources.

If there are repeats for them, I'm sorry but it's impossible to know what they know or have read before. I try to search their history sometimes to get a sense of that but energy does run thin to really sort through their past to see if they ever got this detail before.

There is really a rather narrow window of topics to which I contribute - those things where it may have taken me years and many tumbles to find my way. My aim is to help others avoid some of that.

As to your criticism "given that your posts are remarkably unconversational, rigid and lecturing in tone . . ."

Not sure how your computer is receiving a "lecturing tone" just from information posts.

An "excited to share this information" tone or "this is really important" tone does not come across the web very well, though.

Well, as to style . . . you know, we each have our own style. Not everyone can offer conversation and the pleasantries. If I post just a link or set of links, that is often all that energy will allow -- or enough said, as it's all there at the click of the mouse.

Going right to professional sources that can say it better than I seems more time effective in information gathering.

It is a puzzle to see how helping others more easily find information should ever be, as you state: "embarrassing to the community"

Aside from posts that involve reading articles, etc., though . . . .

There is still plenty of room for others to converse.

As to number of posts, time span covers nearly 8 years. A typical day, I may post on 3 to 6 threads.

But I get it that you are tired of seeing the word "magnesium" and generally tired of seeing anything you've seen posted before where similar questions have been asked.

I learned long ago, after you were very clear to never reply to any questions you post. I have tried to stay out of your way - on your own threads.

But when others ask questions that deserve the same kind of attention as those before them, it seems unfair to be told they don't deserve that.

You might want to Google: how to scroll on a website
-

[ 02-19-2015, 09:10 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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TerryK
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jlcd1- I am the opposite - hypothyroid but my aunt was hyperthyroid. She had her thyroid removed and had difficulty regulating those hormones for the rest of her life.

Seems prudent to have some testing to determine if you do have hyperthyroidism because hypo can have similar symptoms as can other things.

Before embarking on any drastic treatment I'd see a Naturopathic doctor as there are apparently some protocols that may normalize a hyperactive thyroid if that is indeed what you have.

Also, check out keeblers advice for more considerations.

VV - I have always found Keebler to be very thoughtful and helpful in her replies. She even went to the trouble of researching other posts of jlcd1's in order to understand the problem better before responding. I find your response to her unkind and undeserved. Just scroll on by if you don't want to read.

Terry

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by Keebler:

By the way, the first two symptoms mentioned in the question posed here are: Anxiety, heart palpitations . . .

The first thing that should be asked really is about magnesium levels. Low magnesium can be at the root of both (even if there are other considerations as well).


-
Very true.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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jlcd1
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Thanks everyone. I havent gotten through all the articles yet...working on it. I take remag now, up to 1/2 cap full once a day. Hoping to get a test done soon that shows all the minerals in your body on a cellular level.

But its $200 so I've gotta hold off. And sorry about the duplicate post, ive been kinda spacy lately.

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Keebler
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IMO, those tests can't always tell us what we think. I've had various ones that just were not worth the money. How I felt was a much better indication.

Unless it's testing levels of things that require a perfect "window" (I can't explain what I'm trying to say, sorry but I'm thinking of things like iodine that you would not want to go over 12.5 mg a day, for instance).

As for magnesium, your regular doctor can order an intracellular magnesium test. Insurance should cover that.

Still, magnesium is quickly depleted in just 8 hours. Testing can be hampered due to that, too. Still, an intracellular test is a good idea.
-

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patches10025
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http://www.newtonlabs.net/Thyroid-Assist/productinfo/N074/


Works well for both hypo and hyper.

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Lymetoo
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jlcd.. You might get better results on the ReMag by taking it twice a day. If you can't afford more, then cut what you are taking in half and take that twice a day. Space it out a bit.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Abxnomore
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Should there be a limit on how many posts a person could post and that they be relevant so that they don't totally drown out the original post?

Seriously, this could be renamed "Keebler's Thread".

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jlcd1
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Thanks keeper...always lots of help!! I'll try to up my remag
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Mommabear
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I have Graves Disease. (Hyperthyroidism)
I used PTU and did well, got pregnant and have three more kids(already had one). AFter my last one, I went out of remission, went back on PTU and did well again, after going off of it to see if I would do well without it, I did fine and have been in remission 7 years now.
My thyroid is still there, I don't use meds at all.

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canefan17
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Magnesium has helped me with so many issues I would have never thought possible. So I'm with Keebler on this one.
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