LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » what is the name of the supp that prevents c-diff?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: what is the name of the supp that prevents c-diff?
lpkayak
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5230

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lpkayak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I only know it as sbc

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13710 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Florastor .. saccromyces boulardii

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 94530 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Also avoid PPI Rx. They have been directly linked as a contributing "set up", too.

PPIs also have other risks aside from this issue.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton-pump_inhibitor

PPI classification of Rx -- Proton-pump inhibitor

. . . Low levels of magnesium can be found in people on PPI therapy and these can be reversed when they are switched to H2-receptor antagonist drugs.[18][22] . . . .


Cross search these two terms at Google: "c. difficile" "Proton-pump inhibitor"


http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/808398

C difficile Infection Linked to Proton Pump Inhibitors

- by Larry Hand - MedScape - July 24, 2013
-

[ 10-11-2015, 01:25 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Also being mindful of a keeping balance of a full range of probiotics in the gut. They all work as a team.

saccromyces boulardii may not be right for each person and there are many pre and probiotics to consider and get to know. Foods, too, such as sauerkraut, miso, brewers / nutritional yeast can be of help.

If one has a naturopathic physician, they would know more.

[ 03-22-2017, 05:07 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lpkayak
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 5230

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lpkayak     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
ty....

--------------------
Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

Posts: 13710 | From new england | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/132832?#000001

Topic: Gut, herbicide and deadly pathogen grow in gut [GMO, etc.]

c. diff discussed here -- our food sources -- and the sources of "their" food matters so much

Thanks to Brussels for this wonderful collection. Preventing c. diff. can start with our food choices. Seek out organic farmers / cattle ranchers / lamb grazers / poultry producers and the like. Getting to know legumes also will help the budget when focusing on organic supply.

When eating out, try to choose accordingly. It does matter.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
poppy
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5355

Icon 1 posted      Profile for poppy     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Why would florastor prevent c diff?
Posts: 2888 | From USA | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
poppy, it's the saccromyces boulardii


Just as probiotics can help against candida and help for a healthy environment in the gut, saccromyces boulardii is a similar but specific sort of "probiotic" that can help build our lower intestine flora against c. diff - scroll down here for detail:

http://www.florastor.com/infographics/digestive-system-facts

Florastor facts

----------

Still, saccromyces boulardii may not be right for everyone at all times. Preventing c. diff requires a multiple pronged approach.

There are various good kinds of probiotics and prebiotics to explore. In foods, too.
-

[ 10-06-2016, 08:54 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://www.cbsnews.com/48-hours/

Commonly used heartburn drugs may lead to kidney damage: study

By Ashley Welch CBS News April 14, 2016

Long-term use of a common type of medication used to treat heartburn, acid reflux, and ulcers may lead to an increased risk of kidney disease and kidney failure, new research shows.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, adds to prior research that suggests proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), a group of drugs which reduces gastric acid production, can lead to serious kidney damage. . . .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
LymeToo just posted this in another thread. The page may need to be re-set as it's a Continuing Medical Education unit. The authors' names could also be used in a cross search of the topic to find more they have written on this.

https://reachmd.com/programs/cme/challenges-and-opportunities-managing-clostridium-difficile-infections/7924/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=CPC&utm_campaign=CME_7924_FB

Challenges and Opportunities in Managing Clostridium Difficile Infections

Host Thomas M File, Jr. MD MSc MACP FIDSA FCCP
Guest Carlene A. Muto, MD, MS

. . . discussing the spectrum of infections caused by Clostridium Difficile bacteria.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
The spray (from mostly public) FLUSHING TOILETS are also a major contributor to the spread of various infections.

In hospital & some medical settings, this can contribute to the spread of c. diff among patients, staff and visitors. And, even in all kinds of public spaces, the spray can carry c. diff. if it just happens to be in the mix of a previous toilet user.

At home, always close toilet lid before flushing. The spray can travel several yards. Don't leave toothbrush out in open . . . keep towels - and Kleenex - away from toilet.

Away from home, if you know someone just went into a restroom, give them some time and wait till they exit - and hope you might get the space to yourself so as to perhaps avoid breathing in the FLUSH SPRAY.

Try to not touch surfaces around where toilets flush. Don't use the first paper towel if it's exposed - same as with toilet paper. Just roll one layer past, or two (not good to waste resources but the TP will have toilet spray on it).
-

[ 02-24-2017, 12:16 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02WuF5Jf9KU

The Science Channel - see it for yourself - a real "blue light special"

Why It's so Important to Close the Lid BEFORE flushing.

3:15 Video

They go a very disturbingly long way" . . . even over to the wall. "These drops fly about . . . ."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrrbdSqhLNM

Discovery Channel with Mike Rowe in the bathroom

Spray Back from toilet 3:33 video

[taking to the guy] "When you pee, you get this fountain of . . . spraying about . . . " far from the toilet.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://www.treehugger.com/bathroom-design/more-proof-we-should-change-way-we-design-bathrooms.html

More Proof That We Should Change The Way We Design Bathrooms

By Lloyd Alter - December 30, 2011

Excerpts:

Hospitals have a big problem, a bacterium known as Clostridium difficile. It has thrived in hospitals because it is resistant to many of the antibiotics we are so busy feeding to cows and pigs, let alone human beings who are sick and old in hospitals.

It is often spread by medical staff who don't wash their hands, but a new study shows that it may be spread by flushing toilets. . .

. . . They recommend that toilet lids be closed when one flushes. I think we should go further than that and put the toilet in its own room, the water closet.

I have noted previously the work of Dr. Charles Gerba, who wrote that a toothbrush should not be in the same room as a toilet:

There have been found over 3.2 million microbes per square inch in the average toilet bowl.

According to germ expert Chuck Gerba, PhD, a professor of environmental microbiology at University of Arizona the aerosolized toilet water is propelled as far as 6 feet, settling on your dental toothbrush inclusively. . . .

. . . Closing the lid or keeping the toothbrush in the medicine cabinet isn't enough; they should be in separate rooms. The new study just confirms it. .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
MICROBIOME

Excerpts:

"People know about live yoghurts, but the next stage up is kefir, a Persian soured milk, which has five times as many microbes."

"Diversity is one of the keys to a healthy gut ."

image captions:

Methanobrevibacter helps squeeze more calories out of food.

There are better foods than yoghurt for boosting good bacteria.

Clostridium perfringens is associated with gastrointestinal disease.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170321-why-your-diet-may-be-bad-for-your-gut-bacteria

The Most Important Microbes in Your Body

THE MICROBES IN YOUR BODY THAT YOU COULD'T LIVE WITHOUT

For a healthy body full of ‘good’ bacteria, you may need to do a lot more than eat a probiotic yoghurt, as Adam Rutherford discovered when he took a rather uncomfortable test.

By Adam Rutherford - BBC Future - 22 March 2017

[Excellent information at link about life saving changes - or adjustments - to our diet.]
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/gastroenterology/antibiotic-associated-diarrhea/

Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium Difficile - June 2014

Excerpt:

. . . All groups of antibiotics may cause AAD, but those with broad-spectrum coverage --

in particular

cephalosporins,

fluoroquinolones,

extended-coverage penicillins, and

clindamycin -

- are the most common culprits.2 C. difficile diarrhea is largely a nosocomial disease and is the most frequent cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients.

Its occurrence in the outpatient setting, other than in patients confined to nursing homes, is much less common.1

Although a few earlier studies have not shown an association between gastric acid suppression and C. difficile infection (CDI), recent meta-analysis suggests a significant association.3

Epidemiologic studies have shown that C. difficile is often isolated in hospital wards, including the floors, door handles, and furniture; even weeks after patients with AAD have been removed from the area. . . .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 11290

Icon 1 posted      Profile for randibear     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
gotta be florastor

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Robin123
Moderator
Member # 9197

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Robin123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Note - I see clindamycin on the list for causing C diff - I took oral clinda for 5 years and never got C diff. I got C diff once from a course of erythromycin.
Posts: 12965 | From San Francisco | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Trehalose, a sugar additive poses great risk to stronger & more toxic form of c. diff

. . . c. diff toxins damage the epithelium lining our intestines . . .

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/how-an-oddly-large-beetle-penis-is-inspiring-new-medical-technology-and-more-1.4470178/this-food-additive-is-hard-to-avoid-and-could-make-hospital-su perbugs-more-deadly-1.4470200

Canadian Broadcasting Company - January 06, 2018

This food additive is hard to avoid and could make hospital superbugs more deadly

The sugar trehalose is now added to sweets like cakes and cookies as well as ground beef and sushi rice among others.

8:31 audio segment & article

Rise of C. difficile outbreaks

A common sugar additive in food may fuel deadlier outbreaks of a superbug in hospitals, researchers say.

Excerpts:

. . . Table sugar or sucrose is a disaccharide that includes two simpler sugars linked to each other. Trehalose is also a disaccharide. In the food and pharmaceutical industries, trehalose's unique bond offers advantages over other sugars, Britton said. . . .

. . . Does trehalose mean there's more bacteria or that they are stronger or more virulent? . . .

. . . Trehalose seemed to cause one of the strong bacterial strains to produce higher levels of toxin, said Ballard. He studies differences in the toxins that different forms of C. difficile make.

Ballard called the new findings compelling because they fill in the picture of how C. difficile emerged at such high levels when it did. The more toxins are made, the sicker people will be.

"The trehalose models now suggests the strains could have emerged in the human populations due to their ability to use low levels of trehalose as a nutrient source and out compete other strains.

Then, as a result of producing a stronger toxin, the strains make patients sicker. An unfortunate perfect storm," Ballard said in an email.

The circumstantial and experimental evidence points to trehalose as an "unexpected culprit" in outbreaks of C. difficile since 2001, Ballard concluded in the journal. . . .

[Best to read entire article and listen to the interview. We remember better when we both hear certain individual voices with inflection and emphasis & read in print.]
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
http://beta.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-sugar-c-diff-20180103-story.html

A popular sugar additive may have fueled the spread of not one but two superbugs

By Amina Khan - The Los Angeles Times - Jan 03, 2018

Two bacterial strains that have plagued hospitals around the country may have been at least partly fueled by a sugar additive in our food products, scientists say.

Trehalose, a sugar that is added to a wide range of food products, could have allowed certain strains of Clostridium difficile to become far more virulent than they were before, a new study finds.

The results, described in the journal Nature, highlight the unintended consequences of introducing otherwise harmless additives to the food supply. . . .

. . . To probe the mystery, a team of scientists led out of Baylor College of Medicine in Texas examined two particularly successful lineages of C. difficile, RT027 and RT078, examining what kind of carbon-rich molecules they ate.

Both types, they noticed, seemed very good at using low concentrations of the sugar trehalose as a sole carbon source. . . .

. . . So, was the trehalose causing a bacterial population boom? Not really. The scientists found the RT027 bacterial load in the mice to be roughly the same regardless of whether they were fed this sugar.

Instead, scientists think the microbes' improved ability to metabolize the sugar meant that they also produced more C. difficile toxins — making the bacteria far more virulent.

The researchers also took fluids from the small intestines of three human study participants who were fed a typical diet and tried to grow different strains of C. difficile in it.

Sure enough, RT027 responded to the trehalose in the bodily fluid, while other strains did not.

There's another reason scientists suspect trehalose is feeding the growth of these C. difficile superbugs: Both started making their big breaks roughly around the same time, researchers said. . . .

. . . "Despite these concerns, the correlative findings of Collins and colleagues' study are compelling," he added.

"It is impossible to know all the details of events surrounding the recent C. difficile epidemics, but the circumstantial and experimental evidence points to trehalose as an unexpected culprit."


Study cited:

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25178

Dietary trehalose enhances virulence of epidemic Clostridium difficile

Nature - [8 authors' names at link with 37 reference citations] - 03 January 2018
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Trehalose, basics . . .

No reference to any problems (or to the scientific finding of researchers in link above) in this basic Wikipedia listing with mostly industrial advertising sort of material, however it may be important to note it's used in some eye drops. I would sure want to explore the safety of that after learning more about it.

Now, Trehalose does occur naturally in some foods. But these foods - that is real food from the plant world - they have been around for nearly all of time. It's the more recent industrialized, processed / tweaked use of it that (as scientists are finding), seem to have - in part with other variables - sparked the superbugs.

[Unless one has a case of c. diff or history of it] I would not be concerned about its naturally being in, say, mushrooms but am much more concerned about its use as an additive in processed foods, eye drops and maybe in some medicine?

It seems to me it might be best to avoid it other than as it might naturally occur in nature / real foods. Though, again, for those with c. diff, they might need to avoid this in real foods, too - perhaps?

These are just my thoughts, of course. Best to look to scientists for more detail and not those who profit by its commercial use.

It might be very hard to know if this is added to certain prepared foods as it might hide under other names as simply "sugar" or maybe even "corn starch" . . . . so much more to investigate about this. Sigh.

I stumbled upon this just in my "leisure reading" and a quick look at news from Canada as I like to do from time to time. I had not seen in in other U.S. news outlets until I searched for it.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trehalose

Trehalose

. . . Trehalose is an ingredient . . . in an artificial tears product used to treat dry eye. . . .
-

[ 01-06-2018, 04:56 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I wonder if trehalose seems to help fuel c. diff superbugs if it might also be fuel to other infections, strains, under certain circumstances? Not a simple question.

I don't know exactly where this appears in this list, yet from the Google search of: trehalose "vaccine ingredients"

https://circleofdocs.com/complete-list-of-vaccines-ingredients-and-descriptions-of-ingredients/

Complete List of Vaccines, Ingredients and Descriptions of Ingredients

Circle of Docs - 2014 CDC Vaccine Schedule from Birth to Adult

. . . Based on the database generated from 40 lots at laboratory scale, a relatively high level of carbon sources in YE

(trehalose plus lactate, >9.5% w/w)

and an intermediate level of adenine (0.14-0.24% w/w) appear to be the minimal requirement of a good lot for this recombinant yeast fermentation . . .


For reference:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=131625;p=0

VACCINE LINKS set - Ingredients in Vaccines
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Other questions that come to mind and for which Google does supply some links:

Trehalose, ingredients, food

Trehalose, ingredients, medicines

Trehalose, ingredients, (and maybe even in in personal care / beauty products? Yep, found that, too.)

and if trehalose might also be fuel to increased severity of MSRA / staph superbugs? I've not asked that question of the web yet, though.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
https://www.institutefornaturalhealing.com/2014/10/this-hidden-ingredient-makes-fast-food-even-more-dangerous/

This Hidden Ingredient Makes Fast Food Even More Dangerous

Health Warning by INH Research

INH (Institute of Natural Healing) - October 28, 2014

Excerpts:

. . . And we’re not even talking about the “pink slime” scandal. It’s not even because of the ammonium hydroxide they use to “wash” their beef products. . . .

. . . Trehalose is a sugar made from GMO corn.

That’s dangerous for weight gain…

But the proprietary process—if it’s like corn syrup—likely involves gasoline and hexane just to make it. Not exactly something you want to be eating. . . .

. . . Like high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), trehalose is recognized as “safe” by the FDA. This means it’s not subject to the same requirements as other food additives.3

It may not be long before it ends up in other foods you wouldn’t expect. But what’s really scary about it is that its main purpose is to hold fake food together.

It keeps [some fast foods] “meat” from deteriorating. . . .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
minimonkey
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 8693

Icon 1 posted      Profile for minimonkey     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Wow, thank you for this information!!

--------------------
"Looks like freedom but it feels like death..
It's something in between, I guess"

Leonard Cohen, from the song "Closing Time"

Posts: 822 | From California | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
willbeatthis
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 31111

Icon 1 posted      Profile for willbeatthis     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I continue to use: Jarrow saccromyces boulardii
.

Have people found Florastor to be more effective or the best at this?

Thanks All!

Posts: 857 | From Southeast | Registered: Mar 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GVS
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 48913

Icon 1 posted      Profile for GVS   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Dr. K says the most effecitve thing for c. diff. is BioImmersion’s Supernatant probiotics

NP "D" recommends 2capsules/day of the probiotics for a dosage

Floraphage, by Arthur Andrew medical, taken with probiotics, radically increases the effectiveness of any probiotic

Sometimes the Supernatant probiotics are on backorder; it's best to stock up ahead of time

Another alternative is Custom Probiotics c. diff. blend of their 11-strain probiotic powder. Taken long-term, the blend, which contains half lactobacillus rhamnosus, will subdue d. diff. without the disruption of gut flora caused by antibiotics.

GVS

**edited LLMD practitioners' names.**

[ 01-15-2018, 12:20 PM: Message edited by: Lymetoo ]

Posts: 226 | From durham, nc | Registered: Oct 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Florastor has been proven to work .. I have heard good things about the NOW brand also.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 94530 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GVS
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 48913

Icon 1 posted      Profile for GVS   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
To calm down the diarrhea associated with c. diff., google "barley water"; for anyone not gluten intolerant this can get rid of the diarrhea in days.

GVS

Posts: 226 | From durham, nc | Registered: Oct 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27280500/amelioration-of-clostridium-difficile-infection-in-mice-by-dietary-supplementation-with-indole-3-carbinol

Keep in mind this great supplement was used in an experiment with MICE, not humans. That said I3C is one powerful supplement.

Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/11/25/657861409/dangerous-infection-tied-to-hospitals-now-becoming-common-outside-them

Dangerous Infection Tied To Hospitals Now Becoming Common Outside Them

By Clayton Dalton - NPR - November 25, 2018
Excerpt:

. . . Clostridium difficile, or C. diff, can cause diarrhea and a life-threatening infection of the intestines. The bug was associated with nearly 30,000 deaths in 2011.

First seen as a problem mainly confined to hospitals and nursing homes, research suggests C. diff rates in the community are on the rise, and that traditional risk factors may no longer tell the whole story. . . .

. . . Diet strongly influences the microbiome and could be an element, she says. A recent study found that trehalose, a common food additive, markedly enhances the virulence of C. diff, although Guh cautions that there have been difficulties replicating the findings.

Guh thinks some common medications could be involved, too. Popular drugs for heartburn that suppress acid in the stomach are associated with C. diff infections, and have been shown to disrupt the microbiome.

And in March a study in Nature evaluated the effects of a thousand non-antibiotic medications on friendly bacteria in the human colon and found that 25 percent had antimicrobial activity. . . .

========================
trehalose

rehalose is a sugar consisting of two molecules of glucose. It is also known as mycose or tremalose. Some bacteria, fungi, plants and invertebrate animals synthesize it as a source of energy, and to survive freezing and lack of water.

--Trehalose occurs naturally in small amounts in mushrooms, honey, lobsters, shrimps, certain seaweeds (algae), wine, beer, bread and other foods produced by using baker's or brewer's yeast.
--
What foods contain trehalose?

Trehalose Sources. Trehalose occurs naturally in small amounts in mushrooms, honey, lobsters, shrimps, certain seaweeds (algae), wine, beer, bread and other foods produced by using baker's or brewer's yeast.

https://www.sciencealert.com/common-superbug-fuelled-by-popular-sugar-additive-trehalose

A Common Sugar Additive Might Be Driving The Rise of One of The Most Aggressive Superbugs

By David Nield - Science Alert - 6 January 2018

. . . The finger of blame is pointed squarely at the sugar trehalose, found in foods such as nutrition bars and chewing gum. . . .

. . . In this case, trehalose is being linked with the rise of two strains of the bacterium Clostridium difficile, capable of causing diarrhea, colitis, organ failure, and even death.

The swift rise of the antibiotic-resistant bug has become a huge problem for hospitals in recent years, and the timing matches up with the arrival of trehalose.

"In 2000, trehalose was approved as a food additive in the United States for a number of foods from sushi and vegetables to ice cream," says one of the researchers, Robert Britton from the Baylor College of Medicine in Texas.

"About three years later the reports of outbreaks with these lineages started to increase. Other factors may also contribute, but we think that trehalose is a key trigger."

The C. difficile lineages Britton is referring to are RT027 and RT078. When the researchers analysed the genomes of these two strains, they found DNA sequences that enabled them to feed off low doses of trehalose sugar very efficiently.

In fact, these particular bacteria need about 1,000 times less trehalose to live off than other varieties of C. difficile, thanks to their genetic make-up. . . .
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GVS
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 48913

Icon 1 posted      Profile for GVS   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For people who have trouble tolerating probiotics made from fungus,like Florastor, VSL#3 -- made by AlfaSigma -- is effective against Clostridium Difficile, especially when combined with Arthur Andrew's Floraphage, which makes it more effective and affordable.

GVS

Posts: 226 | From durham, nc | Registered: Oct 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
migs
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 16496

Icon 1 posted      Profile for migs     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
VSL#3 is not effective against C Diff. I have had C Diff several times and it has become a chronic battle. I have tried most probiotics/yeasts/supplements/diets/medications that u can think of.

VSL#3 does not help any more than a cheap probiotic from the drug store. It is better than nothing but it is very expensive and less effective than most probiotics.

Florastor (S Boulardii) works quite well and will really beat back an acute bout of C Diff if u take about 20 Billion units twice a day for a few days. I also get great help from Lactobacillus Plantarum , Liberty brand Kefir, and a very clean diet with lots of veggies and little fruit and almost no sugar.

If u are really desperate and need to stay on oral antibiotics, u could find yourself saving the stool of your healthy child or dog, freezing it, chipping it into pieces, and putting into a handful of oral gelatine capsules. That will fix u for a while...how bad do u want to save your job or marriage?

Posts: 410 | From Victoria BC, Canada | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GVS
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 48913

Icon 1 posted      Profile for GVS   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My experience with VSL#3 against C. Diff. is that its effectiveness is determined by its dose.

Taken without the amplification in power of Floraphage, VSL#3 would either be ineffective at low doses or prohibitively expensive at high doses.

Probiotic retention enemas with Lactobacillus Reuteri powder or L.Casei powder available from Custom Probiotics are at least as effective if not more effective than any oral agents. It just takes a little time to do them regularly -- every week or two. And it takes some weeks for them to start having a cumulative effect.

Nothing, of course, is more effective than fecal transplants. I wouldn't trade the results I got from doing mine for anything. From infection-inundated to having a 98% free of gut infections. Best money I ever spent. For the first time in my life, my gut flora is mostly normal, and I'm 56.

GVS

Posts: 226 | From durham, nc | Registered: Oct 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to the Terms and Conditions.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.