LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Dr. B's protocol says it's mandatory to lift weights. Maybe this is why....

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Dr. B's protocol says it's mandatory to lift weights. Maybe this is why....
droid1226
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34930

Icon 1 posted      Profile for droid1226     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Dr.B never makes the biology of it clear, but he says it's mandatory to lift weights every other day. Apparently weight training speeds up metabolism. Lyme is a metabolic disorder.


http://www.mensfitness.com/weight-loss/lift-weights-lose-your-gut

[ 07-21-2015, 01:30 AM: Message edited by: droid1226 ]

--------------------
http://www.youtube.com/user/droid1226/videos?view=0&flow=grid

Posts: 1181 | From ohio | Registered: Nov 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SLML
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 42986

Icon 1 posted      Profile for SLML     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for sharing :-)
Posts: 123 | From Washington State | Registered: Dec 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
droid1226
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34930

Icon 1 posted      Profile for droid1226     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sure. It seems so crucial if a Dr who's treated over 10k patients says that you won't get better no matter what you do unless you're doing an hr of weights every other day.

I know it's sort of mutually conflicting that people are too weak to do it, yet need to do it.

Dr. B got himself better. It may have been that same type of discipline that gets someone to become a dr in the first place.

I'd hate to think that I wasted yrs of treatment & tens of thousands of dollars because I didn't do one of his crucial steps. But he clearly says it's mandatory.

It may be oversimplifying things but lyme clearly slows down all of our metabolisms(inability to detox). So anything we can do to speed it up would obviously help.

--------------------
http://www.youtube.com/user/droid1226/videos?view=0&flow=grid

Posts: 1181 | From ohio | Registered: Nov 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
Moderator
Member # 11141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sixgoofykids   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
More specifically he says strength training. I only point that out because there are more ways than one to do strength training. I, personally, use classical pilates with the equipment. The resistance is in the springs instead of weights.

I agree that you MUST move. There were days my husband DRAGGED me to the gym. I used weights when I was that sick and spent much more time lying down on the bench than picking anything up, but I did what I could. One hour. Every other day.

Once I got strong enough, I switched over to Pilates because I enjoy it more. The Pilates I do is vigorous and uses resistance. You have to find something you enjoy so you stick with it. I credit exercise with getting me all the way well.

There are so many reasons it helps. What you posted above, plus it moves lymph and brings oxygen deep into your tissue with increased breathing and blood flow.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

Posts: 13449 | From Ohio | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
I have never been able to lift even light weights - hands can barely close enough to carry a jar across the kitchen or open a door knob - I've devised special tools to help.

Many people with joint and tendon trouble can't grasp / make a fist enough to lift weights even if light ones. They just can't. And to force that could be dangerous and damaging to tender, inflamed tissue.

Of course, the hope is that if one can access treatment, the joint and tendon issues will improve.

Yet, as sixgoofykids points out, there are other ways to work on strength training.

Qigong is one surprising way, too. It has many benefits for those who may have issues with hands / wrists / elbows & other joints / tendons.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
droid1226
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34930

Icon 1 posted      Profile for droid1226     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I should have said "strength" absolutely. I find it hard to lift my arms some days, I can't imagine weights or even pilates. But there's other days that I can.

I just posted it because it for the newer people but thanks for adding that there's many ways to do strength training.

--------------------
http://www.youtube.com/user/droid1226/videos?view=0&flow=grid

Posts: 1181 | From ohio | Registered: Nov 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Haley
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 22008

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Haley     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I think when those guidelines were written these other types of exercise were not popular ... Pilates ... Yoga etc otherwise I'm sure he would have included it.

I love Pilates . I have a DVD where I can choose the amount of time for a routine. I'll start with 5 minutes every other day , then work up to 45 minutes. That may take awhile though😬

Posts: 2232 | From USA | Registered: Aug 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
koo
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 30462

Icon 1 posted      Profile for koo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree with Six and Haley. I was an avid weight lifter before I got sick. Once I got sick though, it wasn't the strength part that I had difficulty with, it was exercise tolerance. I chalk that up to adrenals.

This became a source of great frustration being a distance runner and weight lifter. A year ago I thought I would try Pilates and yoga, I felt I had nothing to lose.

I started slow and worked my way up quickly. I can tolerate doing these classes 5-7 days a week. I feel much better overall and rarely treat lyme.

Posts: 478 | From Third Coast | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
A.G.
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 44713

Icon 1 posted      Profile for A.G.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I wonder if it also has to do with POTS?

Being chronically ill, bed bound, making your muscles work against gravity could maybe help protect against developing POTS? Maybe? Is it possible?

That's my quandary as I lie here bedbound...not yet lifting weights.

Posts: 115 | From US | Registered: Sep 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
koo
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 30462

Icon 1 posted      Profile for koo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Addendum: I also want to add TRX, which is great for strength, and also barre classes. If your knees are shot then barre probably isn't for you. I enjoy these classes as well.

AG, I think what I found for myself that weight lifting is isolating muscle, whereas these other disciplines are engaging the muscles through a movement....similar yet different.

Posts: 478 | From Third Coast | Registered: Feb 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
A.G.

Bedbound?

Qigong can be done lying down, too. There are various instructors around most places these days and one who could likely come to you for instruction. Or YouTube.

ISOMETRIC exercises can be of help. But, for the pushing part that is also required,

Hopefully, a good friend can work with you for resistance kinds of pushing / massage work. Or work against a wall, etc. to get some kind of push / release.

This can be fun with two people, actually. Be sure to play. But, if you cannot push much, that is okay, a LMT will know how to work with that for your benefit.

A LL PT could better suggest methods, of course but they should be lyme literate. LLMDs know best the PTs in the area who might be best suited.

Some PTs can "shame" those with such issues, though, so be absolutely certain BEFORE you arrange any appointments that they are fully aware and in tune.

There have been some with lyme & TBD who could not do anything for themselves but required MASSAGE so that circulation and muscles were attended to - for some periods of time.

If you can't move a muscle, it still needs to be moved, somehow, by someone. And there is no shame in that. With such care, it can get better.

A LLMD would also know the best LMT (licensed massage therapists) for someone with such needs.

POSTURE is a major concern, too. A FELDENKRAIS instruction could help you be sure your ergonomics are in good line for all your resting positions.

As for being bed-bound. Is there a way you could transfer to a chair and back and forth several times a day? Being in one place can be so rough. Bed sores can also develop so be very careful.

Even second-hand, these can be spendy yet the STRESSLESS CHAIR is excellent support and can be tilted back in various degrees, lessening pressure on body points.

I got one from Craig's List, older models are still very good support.

http://www.ekornes.com/us/stressless-recliners

EKORNES STRESSLESS RECLINER

Also a good choice, also spendy, so check Craigslist: ZERO GRAVITY CHAIR

but get a hard backed one. The lawn chair kinds are not that great for true back support for long periods of time but you will find the lawn chair kinds at a kinder price.
-

[ 07-22-2015, 02:27 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
There are some who have a real and true exercise intolerance. It's just important to know this and that pushing harder is not necessarily good for everyone.

For anyone who wants (or needs) to understand more about how this works or, more precisely - does not work out - and what can help:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/115275

Topic: post exertional malaise/pain/herx...anyone had success getting rid of this?

Exercise Intolerance discussed.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Okay, so much for the "Twilight Zone within the Twilight Zone" . . . now the airwaves can go back to the regular channel. Thank you for your patience in this public service announcement.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Mjoey had post exertional malaise so it was hard to exercise. Lyme was not an issue for him anymore after the Bionic treatment, I suppose.

He continued to have CFS but no longer lyme.
-------------

I had a problem with physical exercises, I couldn't exercise for lack of energy... I could barely stand up and take a shower, so how could I think about exercising?

I got better almost without any exercise program. I love walking though, so I think I only kept moving ONLY after I had the energy for that, but never did any systematic training.

When I finally got well, I could swim and cycle up and downhill again... But that was AFTER LYME was gone.

I guess each case is a case... of course if I could, I would have done something, but I could barely make any mental calculation of 2 + 3 = 5 as it consumed too much energy, couldn't concentrate to cook more than one dish the whole day as I kept forgetting what are the steps, one after another.

It was total lack of energy in my case. So nope, exercise was not for me during the worst months... Only later, when I got slowly better.

Posts: 6196 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Brussels,

Your comment is so very important. Thanks for sharing that. I'd like to copy it over to the other thread so it's part of that collection, too.

I sure know what you mean about mental calculation, cooking, too. It's so vital that your experience is out there so others can be kinder to themselves if they are in the same boat.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
droid1226
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34930

Icon 1 posted      Profile for droid1226     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I agree with Haley. Starting small is crucial imo. Even 5 mins might be too much. I started at 30 secs & have ramped up since.

The last thing you want to do is set your goal too high, then pay hard for it & have a bad taste in your mouth about exercise.

--------------------
http://www.youtube.com/user/droid1226/videos?view=0&flow=grid

Posts: 1181 | From ohio | Registered: Nov 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Overwhelmed
Member
Member # 38499

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Overwhelmed     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I wonder if walking each day for about 20 min would suffice being that walking is just about all I can do??
Posts: 82 | From New York | Registered: Aug 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TF
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 14183

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TF     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
From page 32 of Burrascano:

"A simple walking program will not work. . ."

http://www.lymenet.org/BurrGuide200810.pdf

Posts: 9931 | From Maryland | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sounds like exercise is important.

[ 07-28-2015, 06:44 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TF
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 14183

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TF     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Stair climbing is aerobic, so it is not allowed.

Push ups and sit ups are OK as part of a 1 continuous hour routine of weightlifting and calisthenics.

Since each one-hour session has to be a full body workout, you have to be sure that you are working each and every possible muscle group in the body--arms, legs, chest, back, abs, butt.

So since you don't say if you are doing leg weights, or bench presses, etc. I can't evaluate the routine.

You want to exercise each muscle group in the arms, each in the legs, etc. Are you doing that? Are you weightlifting for one continuous hour? These are the 2 important requirements.

So, if you are doing 30 minutes of sit-ups, that is not what you want to do. That only works certain muscle groups. You must diversify. Do a number of different types of weightlifts and calisthenics.

"The program must evolve into a graded, ultimately strenuous exercise program that consists of a specific regimen of non-aerobic conditioning"

"a whole-body exercise program, consisting of light calisthenics and/or resistance training, using light resistance and many repetitions."

Pages 31 and 32 of Burrascano.

Posts: 9931 | From Maryland | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Robin123
Moderator
Member # 9197

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Robin123     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I like stretching. I do modified yoga. Everything is a yoga stretch, supported - on the floor, against a wall, resting on a window sill - I don't have to hold any part of me up - all supported, so no muscle spasms occur.
Posts: 13049 | From San Francisco | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
Moderator
Member # 11141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sixgoofykids   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Overwhelmed:
I wonder if walking each day for about 20 min would suffice being that walking is just about all I can do??

If it's all you can do, it's a start, but as TF said, you need more. Maybe you can sit in a chair and do hand weights or a theraband.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

Posts: 13449 | From Ohio | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymedin2010
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34322

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymedin2010     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Don't overdue the weights & never more than what your body can handle is the key.

[ 07-28-2015, 06:46 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]

Posts: 2087 | From NY | Registered: Oct 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
surprise
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 34987

Icon 1 posted      Profile for surprise     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I saw some video with the great Dr. B speaking, and I swear he touched on this subject and said something along the lines of

the bacteria like to hide under the skin, and the weight lifting/ working muscle groups flushes them out. And the immune system bit.

The whole 'flushing' concept/ getting circulation movement makes sense to me.

I do exercise (not high aerobic, cannot handle) and it's a big deal to how I feel. Also, a 'foam roller' really gets tension and build up out/ relaxes,

I do it everyday and can tell when I don't get to it. That then loosens me up to stretch.

--------------------
Lyme positive PCR blood, and
positive Bartonella henselae Igenex, 2011.
low positive Fry biofilm test, 2012.
Update 7/16- After extensive treatments,
doing okay!

Posts: 2518 | From USA | Registered: Nov 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SacredHeart
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 44733

Icon 1 posted      Profile for SacredHeart     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Is there a source some place that shows EXACTLY what needs to be done, what equipment is needed, ect... I'd hate for myself, or

anyone else to do this the wrong way and end up in the gutter because of it.

If there isn't, would someone please draft a rough outline of what they did to get better, and how they worked up?

I'd like an example of each exercise, reps, sets, ect for gradual improvement...

--------------------
Lyme flare June, July, August of 2013. Diagnosed September 2014 Lyme, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Mono

Posts: 595 | From Texas Crossroads | Registered: Oct 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TF
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 14183

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TF     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The requirement is one continuous hour of weightlifting/calistenics, a full body workout, every other day.

Read about it in Burrascano, pages 31-32. You don't have to do it any one particular way.

Here are 2 threads where I talk about the Lyme exercise requirement and what I personally did:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=132207;p=0#000001

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/131076?#000008

Posts: 9931 | From Maryland | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
Moderator
Member # 11141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for sixgoofykids   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
SacredHeart, It's whatever workout you are drawn to that is whole body strength training. TF used weights. I used Pilates (on equipment with springs for resistance). You could probably even do TRX if it's near you. Weights are probably the easiest for someone who is still really sick because you can do things so slowly if you need to.

The big thing is to have resistance and not rely on cardio or walking. We need to work out the muscles.

Think of a sludgy pond and what happens to it when you put a fountain in it that brings oxygen to the water and gets the water moving around. Eventually the movement from the fountain oxygenates and moves the whole pond eliminating the sludge.

That's the goal. Whole body, resistance exercises.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

Posts: 13449 | From Ohio | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
hiker53
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 6046

Icon 1 posted      Profile for hiker53     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have not done a lot of strength training, except using flex bands for physical therapy for my shoulder and knee problems.

Flex bands are a cheap great option to weights.

--------------------
Hiker53

"God is light. In Him there is no
darkness." 1John 1:5

Posts: 7049 | From Illinois | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Keebler     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
-
Just good to know & keep in mind, regarding tendons, etc:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=131279;p=0

Fluoroquinolones (Levaquin, Cipro, Gemifloxacin / Factive, etc.) - LINKS set

For a more detailed look into this topic, it's alarming that so many have experienced devastating effects. It's not unusual at all.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Notti
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 43843

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Notti     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I am posting a couple of links here for those who want to do strength-training. These exercises can be done at home, which is a great advantage.


:-:-:-:-:-:
Stretching for People with MS, simple stretching exercises:
http://www.nationalmssociety.org/NationalMSSociety/media/MSNationalFiles/Brochures/Brochure-Stretching-for-People-with-MS-An-Illustrated-Manual.pdf

Cancer Supportive Survivorship Care, rehabilitation exercises:
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/exercises.html

Freedom2Move, DVD's with exercises on all levels, developed by a physical therapist:
http://www.freedom2move.org/index.html?m

Growing Stronger, an exercise program developed by Tufts University:
http://growingstronger.nutrition.tufts.edu/exercises/index.html

Growing Stronger, the same program in a document by the CDC:
http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/downloads/growing_stronger.pdf

NHS Strength and Flex exercise plan, with a series of videos and podcasts:
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/strength-and-flexibility/Pages/strength-flexibility-podcasts.aspx#video

All of the NHS Strength and Flex videos on one page here:
http://www.nhs.uk/Video/Pages/strength-and-flex-standing-press-up.aspx?searchtype=Tag&searchterm=Healthy+living_NHS+Strength+and+flexibility&

Mayo Clinic weight training exercises slide-show:
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/multimedia/weight-training/sls-20076904?s=1

NHS 10 minute workouts, lots of different exercises with photos. (Great website!):
http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/loseweight/Pages/Tenminuteworkouts.aspx
:-:-:-:-:-:


Sometimes these websites and documents contain some information/advice that is not suitable for Lyme patients. So be careful with that. I think it's best to follow TF's general advice and to pick the exercises that suit the requirements that were outlined by Dr. Burrascano.

If you can't go to the gym and/or work with a physical therapist or personal trainer, these exercises are a great alternative because they can be done at home. It gives you a more specific idea of what you can do.

If certain exercises are too heavy, or cause discomfort or pain, simply omit them. You can always try again later when you have built some strength and your stamina has improved.

Most instructions are easy to follow, which is very important when your cognition leaves something to be desired.


Start low and go slow, but do start and keep going.
If you are patient and determined you will see the results of your perseverance!

Posts: 109 | From The Netherlands | Registered: May 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WPinVA
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 33581

Icon 1 posted      Profile for WPinVA     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This thread makes me wish for the zillionth time that there were Lyme rehab places. Like they do for cardiac rehab.
Posts: 1737 | From Virginia | Registered: Aug 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jordana
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 45305

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jordana     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I was an exercise fanatic and I miss it. I would have the energy on some days to do it but every time I try I throw my and shoulders out and have to deal with pain and headaches for up to a week afterwards.

I've thought about what I can do that won't upset my neck and shoulders -- both of my gotos, Pilates and Yoga, are out.

I bought a theraband set but even there most of the published exercises at some point ask for twisting, moving and in my case tearing my neck and shoulder muscles. It's been really frustrating.

Posts: 2057 | From Florida | Registered: Feb 2015  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by sixgoofykids:

quote:
Originally posted by Overwhelmed:
I wonder if walking each day for about 20 min would suffice being that walking is just about all I can do??

If it's all you can do, it's a start, but as TF said, you need more. Maybe you can sit in a chair and do hand weights or a theraband.
-

Doing SOMETHING is far better than doing NOTHING.

I kept moving the entire time I was ill. I actually don't remember exactly what I did during treatment, but I was overseeing the care of my elderly mother.

I got plenty of exercise .. at least what I was able to do.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95340 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Notti
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 43843

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Notti     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Jordana, you can start without any resistance bands or weights.

If your arms and shoulders don't cooperate, work around them. Focus on your legs instead and try to train your abdominal muscles as well, if possible. Both have a very important role in the functioning of the autonomic nervous system, so keeping these muscles in shape can have a big impact on your quality of life.

In the last link in my previous post there are lots of exercises included that you can do without taxing your shoulders.

Posts: 109 | From The Netherlands | Registered: May 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.