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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Song playing over and over in my head..??

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Author Topic: Song playing over and over in my head..??
tailfeathers
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I've treated Lyme, some babs, etc. and it got slightly better but off all my meds (elevated LFT's) it's back with a vengeance. It has never gone away.. it's not that I only *hear* the piece, I feel like I'm OCD, I *have* to listen to it over and over or I'll go nuts.

which infection do ya'll associate this with? It usually gets worse when the house is quiet and I'm all alone (which is a lot).

thanks!!

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Keebler
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It could be a kind of tinnitus, actually . . .

&/or auditory parts of the brain over firing with a familiar neurological pattern in a mild seizure sort of way, it may be in a spasm.

Some call this phenomenon an "earworm" and it happens to those who are not ill, too. An "earworm" can drive even the most sane person close to loony, really. But there are ways to stop it in its tracks.

The next time it happens, take note of if there are any fans on with a couple hundred feet to you (if you can tell). A fridge, an AC, exhaust fans even from neighbors or the fan from a store that may be nearby can trigger such sounds in one's brain.

Some stores have huge fan systems and that vibration can travel -- and vibration can set up aural patterns in our brains.

Some faucets when water is running can, too. I always "hear" the phone ring with my kitchen sink water is on a particular "speed".

Neighborhood backyard pools and hot tubs with their pumps can trigger all kinds of aural stuff, too.

The frequency and timbre and other aural elements, well, when one sound "rings" a certain "bell" in our brain . . . sort of strikes that same "note" as a song we know might, that can start an earworm on its way, even if that song had not been hear for a long time.

Magnesium should help but also when this happens, it is very important to put on some music so that you have some other auditory stimuli to break the pattern. This is key, really.

Or start singing other songs.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earworm

Earworm . . .a catchy piece of music that continually repeats through a person's mind
. . . . [read more about this phenomenon here at Wiki]
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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How magnesium can help: if nerve over-firing or muscle spasms, magnesium can help calm that.

And if inflammation is even partly to blame for pressure on auditory receptors in the ears / brain . . . magnesium can help reduce inflammation (although good liver support and antioxidants can, too. Turmeric, etc.).

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=123746;p=0

Topic: MAGNESIUM - Informational Links set
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Keebler
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Be sure you are not taking MSG in food, glutamine or glutamic acid in any supplements as that can also set one up for over-firing of nerve electrical storms. More detail:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/113775?#000000

Topic: Amino Acid Information Link

See post: Caution: Aspartate; Glutamine; and Phenylalanine (3 excitatory amino acids that can be wrong for us when added as supplements, beyond a normal dietary level)

Seaweed has its own natural MSG and can be very excitatory
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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When listening to other music to offset this, it may be best to listen to ambient music, that which has no obvious melody, certain with no clear melody repeat - and with no lyrics. Listen to tunes, then, not songs.

Brain Eno "music for airports" is one such. Try to steer clear of percussion if it has frequent repeats and is just too simple.

Percussion as in some kinds of free form jazz might work okay but that can also excite brain patterns and you want to calm them down. If whatever music you select centers you, that's what you want. Excitement can be for other times.

Classical music also works as it may have a repeating melody but not for many minutes [unlike pop songs] . . . and there are so many other musical parts and any repletion of musical theme is usually a bit different the second or third time around, with different instruments or some slight changes in the key.

Once exception to this is Mozart's "Eine kleine Nachtmusik" ["A Little Nightmusic"] -- that can drive one mad with its repetitive theme. I never want to hear that again, ever. It's one that far too easily can go wild in my brain.

Listen to music you've never heard before. That is a huge help in this matter, too.

[ 08-26-2015, 04:06 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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tailfeathers
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Many thanks Keebler, much info to digest. Already take Mag to tolerance, and this happens when everything is quiet. Weird and annoying!!
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Lymetoo
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I would think it could be bart. I never had it so I don't speak from experience.

Hope you find a way to minimize it.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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delljen
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A song playing over and over in your head often can be an indicator that you have low serotonin levels. Please read below:

https://askthepsych.com/atp/2008/04/08/earworms/

As it relates to the lyme world I think it fits that Bartonella may be flaring. When I experience anxiety, OCD, depression it is often my Bartonella.

--------------------
Lyme, Bart, Babs D, FL1953
I am just sharing my thoughts and experiences - I'm not a medical professional.

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Robin123
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Well, make it a good song! Choose your favorite or favorites if you have to go through this.

I went to sing-along Wizard of Oz last weekend and I can't get the songs out of my head!

So what I do is create new lyrics as I hear the music - it's rather entertaining - you can sing about your life, you know, like "I'm off to see the chiro, the wonderful chiro because, because, because, because, because, because of the wonderful things that she/he does!"

Ok, don't throw a shoe at me!

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SacredHeart
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I repeat things so much I end up screaming I get so pissed off, but is still can't stop. Yelling only briefly stops it.

--------------------
Lyme flare June, July, August of 2013. Diagnosed September 2014 Lyme, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Mono

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Keebler
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2246060/Tinnitus-Cant-tune-head-Tina-30-YEARS--discover-cure-surprisingly-simple.html

Can't get a tune out of your head? Tina had that for 30 YEARS... only to discover that the cure is surprisingly simple

By Jenny Hudson - 11 December 2012

Excerpts:

. . . Tina is describing a surprisingly common condition, musical ear syndrome.

It is a form of tinnitus, a condition that affects one in ten of us.

But while tinnitus is usually a buzzing, ringing or whistling sound in the ear, without any obvious source, in some people it takes the form of phantom music.

Around 90 per cent of those with the condition develop it as a result of hearing loss, says Tim Griffiths, professor of cognitive neurology at Newcastle University. . . .

. . . [Huw Cooper] says: ‘We see people every week who report hearing phantom music, and it’s something that may be under-reported.

‘This is because people are familiar with tinnitus as banging or ringing, but when they hear music, they don’t think of tinnitus.

Instead, they worry they are going mad.’ Brain scans show they are not. In fact, their brain activity during these hallucinations is very similar to people who are listening to actual music.

However, with musical hallucinations, there is no activity in the primary auditory cortex — the area close to the ear where sound signals are normally received and then sent further into the brain to be processed, explains Professor Griffiths.

‘If someone is deaf or loses their hearing, the part of the brain that processes sound signals is deprived of stimulation.

'In the absence of sound, the brain fills in the gaps, as it were, by turning to musical memory for stimulation.’ . . .

. . . [regarding what kind of tunes are "heard"] 'Memories laid down early in life with great frequency tend to be most deeply embedded in the subconscious,’ explains Dr McCollum. . . . [Full article at link above]


Be sure to read the information here about the differences in phantom music, musical hallucination and ear worms, etc.

Various contributing factors listed, so it makes sense to seek out professional help, a neurotologist, say.

Discuss first with LLMD and, if they think it's beyond the scope of your case / treatment with them, ask for referral to both an audiologist and a neurotologist they trust. At least an audiologist can determine if hearing loss is involved.

In Tina's case, hearing loss was the cause. Cochlear implants corrected the problem. Of course, there can be various causes, various solutions to consider. But some stages / kinds of hearing damage have no solutions other than to develop coping methods.

Check all Rx and OTC to see if any cause this symptom, though.

Prevention is key to avoiding or mitigating hearing loss.

I would evaluate every Rx and all OTC for those that may be ototoxic. Also consider switching treatment methods (to a LL ND &/or rife machine) if ototoxic drugs are being used -- or shore up liver support that may help ears (but it may not be enough).

Lyme, itself can cause hearing / vestibular damage, though, so it still has to be treated.

If your city has some Inner Ear support groups, they may also be a good avenue to explore certain experts. Call the medical centers' community health resource centers and ask. Or key audiologists office. They would know.

At this time, hearing tests should be done so you have an idea of how to approach this.
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Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=065801

Topic: TINNITUS: Ringing Between The Ears; Vestibular, Balance, Hearing with compiled links - including HYPERACUSIS

OTOTOXIC DRUGS that can cause hearing loss are also detailed

HEARING LOSS PREVENTION
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tailfeathers
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Thank you all, sorry to hear it affects some of you. YES! am listening to the same darn sad song over and over.

I do wonder about serotonin levels, since I do also feel very 'down', not surprising since I've gone off my meds (elevated LFT's) and have had some personal losses lately..

I think I'll read the links now...

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Robin123
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Someone ought to write a revision of Phantom of the Opera >>> Phantom of the Noggin...

Where in my brain have you been hiding? Really I wish you weren't here! (Angel of Music)

In sleep I sing to me, in dreams I hum
that song which calls to me, it should be mum
(The Phantom of the Opera)

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bigstan
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Musial hallucinations. Should find stuff I posted about this and LD years ago. Its common in LD but gets better and goes away. I think I had it going on about a year or more

--------------------
HERX is a Four Letter Word!

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LisaK
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hmmm.. interestig.

I have tinnitus 24/7 that is ringing, but I also get songplay in my head.

I alsways just thought is was my musicality. ha. I used to sing - pre total sickness- and while I learned new pieces I would have that one in my head non stop. like even when I get up at 4AM to go to bathroom it would be right there keeping me company.

it's great when it's good music (robin [Smile] )but the other week it was something so dumb and terrible and if I think too hard of what it was it might just come back, so I won't go there now

[dizzy]

I had this much worse before bart tx, and it also included repeating words out loud and also repetative motion like taking same step over and over.

but, some repetative motion , like finger tapping and foot swinging while in cross legged position can also be a calming mechanism for people with sensory integration issues or if they are Visual-Spatial and Auditory-Sequential Learners. movement is needed for some people to calm down,

just as sound in the head can also be. I notice when when a certain song is repeated on a CD or whatever, that is calms me down and makes it possible fo rme to accomplish much more in a shorter amount of time.

at least it used to be that way for me- before all this sick crap. now , some days I cannot tollerate any sounds. sigh.

I remember needing to listed to Mozart's Queen of the Night over and over and over.... driving my fmaily crazy, but making me very satisfied.

there are also hidden tracks on CDs that play a sound over and over - like on one Nirvana CD- if you let the CD play all out on a traditional player you cna find it. it is just one sound over and over- like a pulsating buzz. and I used to find that very calming.

so , after all that, I think, for me, that a song playing over in my head is my head's way of comforting itself. calming itself.

unless it's bart , and then that is not comfort. that is usually a bad or negative phrase that repeats. that is deffinitely not a good helpful thing.

--------------------
Be thankful in all things- even difficult times and sickness and trials - because there is something GOOD to be seen

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bigstan
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http://www.tinnitus.org.uk/musical-hallucination

Common with LD.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12940329

--------------------
HERX is a Four Letter Word!

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tailfeathers
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Thanks all for your wonderful replies. LisaK I think you are right in that actualy listening to that particular piece of music does calm me down somewhat.. but then again that's kind of what OCD does too, right? Like you said.. the toe tapping, finger tapping (none of which I have) ..

I really think it's one of the bugs (probably bart) but it shows (I'm sure) that my dopamine and/or serotonin levels are off.

Yes, I too couldn't listen to music for many years after falling ill but now I wake up with it.

bigstan, checking out those links.. thank you. sing away Robin, would love a change of music.. [Smile]

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LisaK
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some students (people) need music to learn. I know someone that started home schooling because her high school wouldn't allow her to keep head phones in her ears with music while in class. she argued that it was the only way she could retain anything.

"Students who listen to classical music with 60-70 beats per minute while they study score on average 12% higher on their Math exams, the equivalent of up to a whole grade.":

http://elitedaily.com/music/music-news/listening-to-music-while-you-study-makes-you-smarter/

and:
http://www.fastcompany.com/3032868/work-smart/how-music-affects-your-productivity

music service based on neuroscience which has been designed to help you focus not only on demand but for extended periods of time- AND you can try a sample at the bottom of the page! ::

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/i-listened-to-music-based-on-neuroscience-designed-to-make-you-focus-and-its-been-amazing-2014-4

--------------------
Be thankful in all things- even difficult times and sickness and trials - because there is something GOOD to be seen

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