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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » lithium chloride

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Author Topic: lithium chloride
Marnie
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Inhibition of ***inositol monophosphatase *** by lithium chloride induces selective macrophage apoptosis in atherosclerotic plaques.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3058172/

In this indel region 5 resides the gene encoding ***inositol monophosphatase*** (BB0524) in B.burgdorferi.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC534632/

?!

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'Kete-tracker
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Too bad it's toxic to take orally. [Frown] ~
See:
Talbott J. H. (1950). "Use of lithium salts as a substitute for sodium chloride". Arch Med Interna. 85 (1): 1–10. doi:10.1001/archinte.1950.00230070023001

It was once sold as a salt substitute (in the late 40s) but "was prohibited after the toxic effects of the compound were recognized"

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Keebler
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The kinds of off the charts doses they used to use (as medicine, not for table salt) are not the way lithium is used today (well, we hope).

Lithium is not toxic in the right form, right dose. In fact, it is required for our bodies. If we are deficient, severe neurological issues can develop.

Jonathan Wright has written a great deal about the benefits of Lithium Orotate and that form has been very helpful for some with lyme to address brain issues.

Some articles pop up with a search at Google for:

Borrelia "Lithium Orotate"

[ 08-28-2015, 03:25 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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by Dr. Jonathan V. Wright, MD:

http://www.tahomaclinicblog.com/lithium-the-misunderstood-mineral-part-1/

Lithium – The Misunderstood Mineral - Part 1


http://www.tahomaclinicblog.com/lithium-the-misunderstood-mineral-part-2/

Part 2
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Keebler
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https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/evolutionary-psychiatry/201201/could-you-have-lithium-deficiency

Could You Have a Lithium Deficiency?

By Emily Deans, MD - Jan 29, 2012


http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/is-lithium-orotate-good-or-bad-for-you/

Lithium Orotate
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Keebler
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However, giving this back to Marnie, the thread's topic may not be as much about any particular form of lithium as about how ever to achieve:

Inhibition of inositol monophosphatase & address atherosclerotic plaques.
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Keebler
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My favorite is allicin where the inside of my blood vessels are concerned. Cutting corners and just taking one of the results from a search at Google for

Allicin "atherosclerotic plaques"

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/14/321

Allicin prevents H2O2-induced apoptosis of HUVECs by inhibiting an oxidative stress pathway

BioMed Central by S Chen - Aug 30, 2014 -

Excerpt: . . . Conclusion

Allicin has powerful effects in protecting HUVECs from apoptosis. The protection occurs via a mechanism involving the reduction in oxidative stress, as measured by increased SOD and reduced MDA, NO and eNOS.

There finding suggest that allicin functions as a powerful antioxidant. Further studies will be necessary to determine the direct effects of allicin on atherosclerosis.
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Marnie
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FSU is developing a new form of Li that won't cause the "naughty" spikes...it is in the pipeline.

I think we have to use the GABA gated ***chloride channels*** for drug delivery...

But...this is a 2015 abstract mentioning LiCl for bipolar:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25870166

The "latest" in AD treatments is to antagonize the H3R (histamine 3 receptors). It is believed persons suffering with AD are not releasing dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, etc. due to too little BH4 (lithium is one supporter of BH4) which is due to a malfunctioning folate cycle (each turn produces one BH4) - MTHFR implications.

Odd that to clear Bb from the GI track = Tritec = rantinidine bismuth citrate. Rantinidine is

Zantac, a H2 blocker.

Now we have Claritin...a H1 blocker.

When AD (spirochetes have been found in the brains of those with AD)...a H3 antagonist.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3171359/


In the UK, they have used a H3 blocker for 40 years to treat another disease -

Betahistine is a potent H3 receptor antagonist.

94% of physicians in the UK prescribe betahistine for Ménière’s disease...

Looks like wherever Bb is camped out...preventing histamine release is vital.

Our OspB antibody should have been IgG1k to prevent histamine release.

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Keebler
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Marnie,

Thanks for posting this. I was interested in what other supplements might also have articles on this topic and, voilà, both berberine and andrographis have much written about their effect with "atherosclerotic plaques", too. Beyond the few favorites of mine:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15892282

Zhongguo Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi. 2005 Apr;25(4):345-9.

Effect of drugs for promoting blood circulation on blood lipids and inflammatory reaction of atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE gene deficiency mice.

Author from Beijing University of TCM

Excerpt:

CONCLUSION:

Chinese medicinal herbs tested in this study can interfere the maturing progress of atherosclerotic plaques and stabilize the plaques in ApoE deficiency mice,

the mechanisms may relate to its actions in regulating lipids metabolism and inhibiting inflammatory reaction.

Different Chinese medicinal herbs for activating blood circulation of conventional dosage might show difference in potency and acting links.
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Keebler
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[from last excerpt] "inhibiting inflammatory reaction" seems a major player with blood vessel health, especially for those with lyme (as it causes so much inflammation).
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Marnie
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Keebler...we were typing at the same time. Read my comments above yours.
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Keebler
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Marnie, Thanks. I will do so but have to rest first - sort of toast right now after this spurt. Your note about GABA is ringing my bell as I think my NMDA receptors are just so wired to the max. You always give us a lot to consider. Merci Beaucoup.
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