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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Lyme and Osteoarthritis?

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Author Topic: Lyme and Osteoarthritis?
Kudzuslipper
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 31915

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Hi all: can you help me clarify/understand this? Can Lyme cause bone deteriation? Or do I just have age to blame?

When I first started treating all my joints hurt! Before treating it was my muscles(or at least muscle pain masked joint pain)

Years later, I do not feel sick anymore... But my X-rays show aggressive osteoarthritis degeneration in my feet and knee.

What do you do to for the pain and to stop further deteriorating?

Posts: 1724 | From USA | Registered: May 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
joalo
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Up.

--------------------
Sick since January 1985. Misdiagnosed for 20 years. Tested CDC positive October 2005. Treating since April 2006.

Posts: 3228 | From Somewhere west of the Mississippi | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
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http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:GWSA9iVm1YAJ:http://lymediseaseguide.org/lyme-disease-triggers-osteoarthritis

Yes, age is a factor as well as estrogen levels -

low estrogen = osteoarthritis up.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9608332

HOWEVER...keep reading! Estrogen (17beta-estradiol) has downfalls!

Is your blood vitamin D level within normal range?

If not, if you are deficient, consider supplementing D3 with K2 in addition to taking a good form of Omega 3 fatty acids.

They work in synergy.

HOWEVER...

In lyme, some suggest Vitamin D supplementation in any form is harmful.

Our immune cells have a receptor for inactive vitamin D3 (in circulation) called VDR that permits inactive D3 -> active D3. It is present on MANY cells.

Then...

"Vitamin D suppresses the immune system."

Which...may involve EBV reactivation because...

Breakdown of inactive and active D3 (catabolism) in the liver is

regulated by CYP3A4.

antiretrovirals (HAART), causes

up-regulation of CYP3A4.

This leads to

decreased levels of 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D,

often resulting in clinically significant osteomalacia.

(Inactive and active form of D3 decreased = refers to a softening of your bones, often caused by a vitamin D deficiency).

So, if EBV is re-activated due to lyme,

and the ***anti-retrovirals***

upregulate liver CYP3A4 this

-> less D3 - inactive and active forms =

protection from lyme and EBV?

But at a cost = osteoporosis = decreased bone strength increases the risk of a broken bone?

BTW...

DOES administration of the CYP3A4 *inhibitor*, fluconazole (Diflucan) to combat Candida

*increase* D3 levels?

Remember UPREGULATING CYP3A4 = down does inactive and active forms of D3 which can be accomplished by anti-retrovirals.

"Vitamin D receptors are expressed on EBV infected B cells, antigen presenting cells and

activated lymphocytes, and the bioactive vitamin D

metabolite

dihydroxyvitamin D3

suppresses antibody production

and T cell proliferation and skews T cells towards a less detrimental Th2 phenotype."

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:ojmSC0Gv_u4J:http://www.direct-ms.org/pdf/VitDMS/Holmoy%2520Vit%2520EBV%2520MS%2520Med%2520Hyp%252007.pdf

I think Bb reactivates EBV (and perhaps CMV also) which are present in nearly everyone, but normally latent.

These viruses are not cleared with antibiotics.

This is out...

...likely via the ability of *resveratrol* to: (1) potentiate 1,25D binding to VDR; (

2) activate RXR; and/or (3) stimulate SIRT1, an enzyme known to deacetylate nuclear receptors.

The results of this study elucidate a possible pathway for crosstalk between two nutritionally derived lipids,

vitamin D and resveratrol, both of which converge on VDR signaling.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25536521

Resveratrol strengthens bones and may help prevent osteoporosis.

"Taken together, our data suggest that E2 (17beta-estradiol) binds to receptors compartmentalized to membranal caveolar domains in HT29 and MCF-7 cells,
inducing ERK 1/2 activation and transcriptional activity,

which finally ***results in upregulation of expression of the VDR gene."***

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15930183

Which helps explain the estrogen-autoimmune connections and why more women than men are on this site...estrogen upregulation of VDR.

Calcium can attach to some antibiotics called tetracyclines in the stomach. This decreases the amount of tetracyclines that can be absorbed.

Tetracycline and similar drugs are calcium chelators.

It would appear depriving Bb of calcium is important.

vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein (CaBP)

"Human brain microvascular endothelial cell traversal by Borrelia burgdorferi requires calcium signaling."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19489925

This is very complex. Don't try to grasp it all in one reading.

What on earth to do?

High levels of EPA (OmegaBrite - internet) might help. It reduces inflammation.

Gotta get inflammation down...bigtime.

In addition NAC maybe beneficial:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19725096

Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

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Yes, Lyme can cause osteoarthritis .. even in younger people.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 94522 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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