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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Other Spirochete Diseases and Traditional Chinese Medicine

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Author Topic: Other Spirochete Diseases and Traditional Chinese Medicine
WakeUp
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The first LD cases in China were reported in 1986, and now LD has been reported in more than 18 provinces. There is no record of this disease in the literature of TCM, but effective TCM treatments exist for five other known spirochetal diseases: syphilis, yaws, relapsing fever, rat-bite-fever, and leptospirosis.

The treatments that have been developed for these spirochetal infections can be borrowed to treat LD. Over the last forty years, Chinese medical scientists have sought to integrate TCM with modern western medicine by comparing the pharmacological effects of the TCM remedies with the physiological actions of western medicine. This integration of TCM and western medicine created a new medicine -- modern Chinese Medicine (MCM). Based on western medicine’s understanding of the etiology and pathology of these diseases, certain MCM herbal remedies, which have anti-spirochetal and anti-inflammatory effects, have been studied to treat these diseases.

Anti-spirochetal Chinese herbs have been successfully used for treating syphilis and leptospirosis in China. Syphilis was a severe illness and affected millions in China. As a result, many effective TCM herbal therapies were developed for treating this disease. Smilax glabrae Rhizoma (SG), as a major ingredient of the herbal formulas, is used to treat syphilis and achieves a greater than 90 percent sero-convert rate back to negative. Even for the late stages of syphilis, the cure rate is above 50 percent.

Leptospirosis is transmitted through contaminated water in the rice paddies in China. In poor rural areas, barefoot farmers work in the rice fields and epidemics of this spirochete disease affected millions of farmers in China. Smilax glabrae Rhizoma has been studied as a preventive treatment for leptospirosis. Out of 2,000 people tested, the incidence rate of a pre-treated group compared with a control group was 1:5.58 -- a statistically significant result, demonstrating that taking SG can successfully prevent leptospirosis.

In recent years, the active ingredients listed below have been identified, and gone through both animal studies and human clinical trials. They were tested and found to kill the spirochetes in leptospirosis, and have been used clinically to treat leptospirosis in China: Allicin, an active ingredient of garlic; Decanoylacetaldehyde, an active ingredient of Houttuyniae Herba (HH); Coptin, an active ingredient of Coptis chinensis Radix, Smilax glabrae Rhizoma, and Scutellariae Radix, etc.
http://www.sinomedresearch.org/ld/treatment/SpiroMCM.htm

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Keebler
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Thanks for bringing this up. I see that your article is from the site below - and I did extraordinarily well for the times when I could do the full protocol (for a few months, two different time. Had I been able to continue, as I saw others do with the full course, that would have been a wise choice. I wish I had not spent all my money on lesser attempts as this one is really excellent. I saw many get much better by sticking with the course.)

Hepapro's Allicin is the best I've ever used - and I did try all the good brands [which one will not find in big box stores, so steer clear of those].

If anyone wants to go back and learn more history on some of herbs mentioned in the article:

www.itmonline.org

Institute for Traditional Medicine

You can search for most traditional Chinese herbs here and find many full research articles. Scroll to the bottom of the articles to see the date written.

WakeUp posted an excerpt from this site, here's how to find the book, etc.:

http://tinyurl.com/5drx94

Lyme Disease and Modern Chinese Medicine - by Dr. QingCai Zhang, MD & Yale Zhang


http://www.sinomedresearch.org/

Website passwords: clinic; clinic

http://www.sinomedresearch.org/ZCprotocols/index.htm

Zhang Protocol


http://www.hepapro.com/hepapro_product.htm

Hepapro
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packypacky
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Keebler, its great to hear you are doing so well on TCM. However, the meds are way too overpriced which I feel bad.
Chinese herbs are very cheap.

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Keebler
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A fair price is not always affordable for many, I know.

A lot of cheap Chinese herbs are not the best quality. Some are, and there are places to find the good ones, of course. But then there is so much to figure out the formulas, etc.

Many of the cheaper ones are the "raw" plant form, not the concentrated ones as in the Hepapro formulas.

But I've never found any Chinese herbs as good as Hepapro's formulas - and so easy. I've used so many others over the years and just have never come close to how much better I felt on Hepapro's protocol.

[There are some South American Amazon forest herbs that are also excellent from RainTree, though, Leslie Taylor's work. And what Buhner's suggests are excellent, yet a different approach. Buhner certainly outlines a much more affordable path and his recommendations for sources are reputable.]

Yet in my searching this matter years ago I found that Hepapro's are a fair price. Still, yes, I know that even a fair price can be too much for many (myself, included). At times, they have were able to offer some discount to low-income patients, so that may still be a possibility for some.

To consider in price, fair labor and clean practices. There is a lot to having clean land, good growing principles, paying those who work these crops, and get these to where they are top quality.

The cost is far less than any pharmaceutical approach. It's really very economical in the long run.

However, the cost is still too much for me - I spent all my money first on a doctor who said he was LL and was not at all. So, that's just one reason I try to help others learn how to get to the best place sooner.
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[ 04-23-2016, 04:47 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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packypacky
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Can you figure out the particular ingredients in each formula? If yes I will order them from China or go back to China for treatment.
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Keebler
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"figure out the particular ingredients in each formula?"

I did that - spent dozens of hours and scoured so many sources (many of which did not qualify as being certain of pureness or fair compensated labor) . . .

it was not possible to find the right forms of many of the herbs so as to have the proper dose equations. Many herbs are just not available in the kinds of powdered extracts as in the original product.

Some condensed herbs in powder offered at excellent sites like 1stChineseHerbs often contain corn or other fillers to make the powder not clump and I could not handle the kinds of added ingredients they used.

Still, those condensed herb powders did not equal the strength of ingredients I was trying to match. Matching the power is a mathematical puzzle with forms that are not equal.

My search was several years ago and I did manage to get some things to an equation only somewhat close. But it was just impossible to duplicate.

And, I also felt like that would have been stealing the work of the good doctor who developed these formula. How many years' training, both in China and the US could I not match? None.

There is a reason why his sources, his laboratories are set up the way they are, he knows what to do. He pays his staff, his farmers, watches out for the environment in which these are grown, etc.


As for going to China for treatment, well, the cost and logistics would be beyond logical. It's also hard to find such a doctor there as the one we have here.

The doctor who started Hepapro is a medical doctor of Oriental Medicine as well as an MD from a top US medical college. He's an expert in liver disease and then learned about lyme. Doesn't get much better than that.

As for cost, indeed, when something is out of our reach, it can really clobber us. After much study on this, all things considered, it is a fair price. I spent many hours learning about all those considerations, too.

As for other ways, yes, there are less expensive ways but if you are trying to duplicate this particular one, it's not something someone without adequate staff and a laboratory with equipment to process the herbs just right, can do.
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packypacky
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Keebler, I figured out the formula, all his Lyme formula. Probably I should make it clear that I'm a Chinese so kind of have a different view of this approach. I put them all on my personal website. If you or anyone's interested, let me know. I'm afraid there are some concerns to put them directly on here.
Thank you!

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packypacky
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BTW, you need to understand that Zhang's protocol is not Traditional Chinese Medicine. What he has done is make pharmaceutical grade products from herbs.

Also, he is NOT a MD. His degree was from China, which is Bachelor's degree. I couldn't find anything online about his peer reviewed publication if he is really a researcher, nor could I find anything about him having anything to do with Harvard. To be frank, I don't think a Chinese Medicine doctor will be invited to do research in US universities. If any, those visiting programs are basically sponsored by government, and just for "visiting".

I hate to say but I find this "doctor" very troublesome in his practice, being a lot business and money driven instead of compassionate and honest.

Just my two cents. If you want to know more, read Amazon review of his another book on hepatitis.

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