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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » antibiotic combinations for Lyme

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Author Topic: antibiotic combinations for Lyme
garnet10
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My doc started me on Doxycycline and Tinidazole, which seems to be working well for me.

My DD's doc started her on Bactrim and Rifampin.

I haven't found any literature regarding using Bactrim for Lyme,

and he didn't think she needed a "cyst-buster"?

What antibiotic combinations have you been given for Lyme;

and which ones did you feel gave you the most benefit?

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dbpei
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I have been on Bactrim and rifabutin in the past. The best combo for me so far has been mepron, ceftin, and biaxin. I have also felt better while on Byron White herbs alone, but still struggle with many neuro symptoms.

I am going to treat aggressively again in an effort to win this battle. Currently I am taking malarone, tetracycline and soon will be adding clindamycin and ceftriaxone to the mix intravenously. I think my LLNP is going to take away the tetracycline when I start the new IV meds.

I am praying for improvement with this combo!

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t9im
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Hi garnet10:

Doxy and Tindazole is the best combo for Lyme.

Bactrim and Rifampin are for Bart.

Remember to take a good probiotic.

--------------------
Tim

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Winter Park
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Minocycline or Doxycycline, Penicillin VK and Clindamycin
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garnet10
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quote:
Originally posted by t9im:
Hi garnet10:

Doxy and Tindazole is the best combo for Lyme.

Bactrim and Rifampin are for Bart.

Remember to take a good probiotic.

That makes me wonder why my doc put me on Bactrim

when I stopped doxycycline for the summer?

He and my daughter's doc both said Bactrim treats

Lyme, although I have not been able to find any

research that Bactrim is effective for Lyme.

This is why I'm curious to see what combinations

of antibiotics others have found effective for Lyme.

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HW88
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I'm taking ceftin and biaxin for lyme and bactrim for bart (although bactrim is making me very nauseated.)
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Tincup
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Bactrim is available as a generic drug under assorted names such as sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim.

"Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, **sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole)**, and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity.

Emerg Microbes Infect. 2014 Jul;3(7):e49. doi: 10.1038/emi.2014.53. Epub 2014 Jul 2.

Identification of novel activity against Borrelia burgdorferi persisters using an FDA approved drug library.

Feng J1, Wang T1, Shi W1, Zhang S1, Sullivan D1, Auwaerter PG2, Zhang Y1.

Abstract

Although antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease is effective in the majority of cases, especially during the early phase of the disease, a minority of patients suffer from post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS).

It is unclear what mechanisms drive this problem, and although slow or ineffective killing of Borrelia burgdorferi has been suggested as an explanation, there is a lack of evidence that viable organisms are present in PTLDS.

Although not a clinical surrogate, insight may be gained by examining stationary-phase in vitro Borrelia burgdorferi persisters that survive treatment with the antibiotics doxycycline and amoxicillin.

To identify drug candidates that can eliminate B. burgdorferi persisters more effectively, we screened an Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug library consisting of 1524 compounds against stationary-phase B. burgdorferi by using a newly developed high throughput SYBR Green I/propidium iodide (PI) assay.

We identified 165 agents approved for use in other disease conditions that had more activity than doxycycline and amoxicillin against B. burgdorferi persisters.

The top 27 drug candidates from the 165 hits were confirmed to have higher anti-persister activity than the current frontline antibiotics.

Among the top 27 confirmed drug candidates from the 165 hits, daptomycin, clofazimine, carbomycin, sulfa drugs (e.g., sulfamethoxazole), and certain cephalosporins (e.g. cefoperazone) had the highest anti-persister activity.

In addition, some drug candidates, such as daptomycin and clofazimine (which had the highest activity against non-growing persisters), had relatively poor activity or a high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against growing B. burgdorferi.

Our findings may have implications for the development of a more effective treatment for Lyme disease and for the relief of long-term symptoms that afflict some Lyme disease patients.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26038747

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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garnet10
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quote:
Originally posted by Tincup:
Bactrim is available as a generic drug under assorted names such as sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim.

Actually, Bactrim is a combination of these two antibiotics: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

I have read the Zhang article. Unfortunately, sulfamethoxazole is only bacteriorstatic when used alone,

and the drug combinations this study found effective when added to sulfamethoxazole (i.e, daptomcyin)are presently not available except as intravenous meds.

Interestingly, this study, unlike Eva Sapi's, did not find tinidazole or metronidazole to be very good at killing "persisters" (cyst forms).

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Tincup
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"Actually, Bactrim is a combination of these two antibiotics: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole."

Yes, that is correct.

I was addressing this comment you made.. "He and my daughter's doc both said Bactrim treats Lyme, although I have not been able to find any research that Bactrim is effective for Lyme."

These notes from Dr. B may be of interest?

https://sites.google.com/site/marylandlyme/treatment/breaking-treatment-plateau

There is a chart on this German site that may be of interest along with some comments about Bactrim.

http://www.morgellons-research.org/morgellons/morgellons-lyme-treatments.htm

Some chronic patients who have used Bactrim refer to it as their "life-saving" med.

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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garnet10
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quote:
Originally posted by Tincup:

These notes from Dr. B may be of interest?

https://sites.google.com/site/marylandlyme/treatment/breaking-treatment-plateau

There is a chart on this German site that may be of interest along with some comments about Bactrim.

http://www.morgellons-research.org/morgellons/morgellons-lyme-treatments.htm

Some chronic patients who have used Bactrim refer to it as their "life-saving" med.

Interesting that Dr. B feels the Bactrim is treating a co-infection and states there has been +/- benefit noted for Lyme.

DD's C4A level actually increased after 4 weeks of Bactrim and Rifampin, whereas mine have declined on Doxy and Tinidazole.

So it is possible that, for her, this regimen was treating a possible co-infection and not necessarily Lyme.

I have read that one cannot use C4A levels to determine if treatment is working, but mine did decline and this correlated with symptom improvement.

[ 11-02-2016, 10:21 AM: Message edited by: garnet10 ]

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