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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Strains of Lyme in North America

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Author Topic: Strains of Lyme in North America
D Bergy
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Hello all.

Does anyone know all the North American strains of Borellia found in the population? I am looking for the probability ranking of one strain over the rest.

I know Borellia Burgdorferi would likely be the most common. What would second and third most likely be?

Thinking my wife either has more than one strain or may not have the most common strain. Just a hypothesesis I intend to test in the future.

Thank you.

Dan

Posts: 2915 | From Minnesota | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tricky Tickey
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In the south, it would be Borrelia lonestari. It mutates, no doubt, and I don't doubt that there are undiscovered spirochetes everywhere.

--------------------
Early Disseminated LD- 2010.
Currently doing acupuncture and yoga.
Negative Igenex (IND & Pos Bands)
ISSUES AFTER: Tendonitis, letter reversal, Low immune system.
PREVENTION:SaltC,Iodine,Humaworm,
Chiropractic.

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Catgirl
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You might try garinii.

--------------------
--Keep an open mind about everything. Also, remember to visit ACTIVISM (we can change things together).

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D Bergy
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Well, I have been working with frequency treatments for my Crohn's and my wife's Lyme for ten years or so. Both well under control but one thing bothers me about her Lyme.

I often use Char Boehm's a DNA based frequencies for various pathogens. They have proven to be exceptionally reliable with one glaring exception.

The DNA based frequencies for Borellia burgdorferi never worked well. That's unprecedented in my experience.

Also, a very commonly effective Lyme frequency of 432 Hz never helped her.

Not a lot to go on but I have gone off of less. It seems to me the most likely explanation would be I was treating the wrong strain with her frequencies.

I may be able to eliminate it entirely if that is the case. Don't know that for certain but it is worth another try with a frequency set for another strain.

Thanks for giving me some more info to work with.

Dan

(breaking up the post for easier reading for many here)

[ 11-17-2016, 04:46 AM: Message edited by: Robin123 ]

Posts: 2915 | From Minnesota | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bartenderbonnie
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I live in western New York. My county did a tick sweep in May. I called the county health department and asked what the results were.

They told me 80% of the ticks collected tested positive for borrelia burgdoferi and borreilia miyamotoi. Yikes !

I kind of know what I m up against. . .

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D Bergy
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Did some have both strains or did they have one or the other?

Dan

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Bartenderbonnie
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I m sorry but I can't answer your question.

When I called the health department and asked what
species was found, they kept telling me borrelia. I said, I know the genus is borrelia, but what is the species of the borrelia that was found? He put me on hold for 5 minutes and said burgdoferi and miyamotoi.

Clearly, ostrich head in the sand mentality in this area !

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D Bergy
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You had the good sense to get the information from a reliable source. I am just not sure if two different strains can typically exist in one organism. I assume they can but never verified that.

Dan

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me
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Borrelia bissettii : http://www.bethesdamagazine.com/Bethesda-Magazine/November-December-2016/Lyme-Disease-Wars/index.php?cparticle=1&siarticle=0#artanc

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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Brussels
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC263628/?page=2

The table shows strains of Borrelia

2591 strain
B31 strain
25015 strain
NCH-1
IPF
etc

The crazy thing is that all of these strains were found in humans (in form of antibodies) ALL OF THEM in about 90% or MORE of their samples!!??

It means, if my brain understood that, that each person has a positive serology for ALL those strains in about 90% of cases!!! ?

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Brussels
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC262544/

This article explains more clearly how they divide borrelia genus into species...

----------------------------------------
Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a tick-borne spirochetal infection caused by three Borrelia species: Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto.

Previous research based on analysis of ospC sequences allowed the definition of 58 groups .

(Brussels: I think that means there are 58 groups of Borrelia known to researchers...)

Therefore, we studied 80 disseminated-form isolates whose ospC sequences were unknown. Of these, 28 (35%) belonged to previously known invasive groups.

Moreover, new invasive groups were identified: six of B. afzelii,
seven of B. garinii,
and one of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto.

This study confirmed that invasive strains are not distributed among all 69 ospC groups but belong to only 24 groups.

This suggests that OspC may be involved in the invasiveness of B. burgdorferi.

-----------------------
Brussels: I don't know what that all means, but certainly there are A LOT of Borrelia groups, and researchers are trying to figure out how to classify these.

Probably, there are many subspecies (like 6 subspecies of B. afzelii, 7 of garinii, and another subspecies of burgdorferi...

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Brussels
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC262544/figure/f2/

OMG!!!

I don't know if you can see that Figure, but if not, click on Fig 2 on the link above.

UPGMA-based tree of invasive ospC sequences from 100 isolates available in data banks (indicated by their accession numbers) and the 25 ospC sequences determined in this study.

B. b. ss, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto;

B. ga., B. garinii;

B. af., B. afzelii;

B. va., B. valaisiana.

---------------------------
What is ospC: these are sequences of aminoacids (protein) found in the outer surface of borrelia.

It may mean, if I understand well, different strains of Borrelia or sorts of subspecies of Borrelia...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7768799

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Brussels
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I guess, if you'd like to know what's going on in terms of finding new Borrelia strains, it is this ospC that you got to google.

http://europepmc.org/backend/ptpmcrender.fcgi?accid=PMC228286&blobtype=pdf

here they explain how they sort of find out /define some new strains / subspecies, if I understood it well...

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Annelet
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Which county are you in ?
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TF
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I think she is in Switzerland.
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Robin123
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In this country, I've heard most about B burgdorferi, B miyamotoi, B bissettii and B lonestari.
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D Bergy
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I suppose I just have to work through the list one at a time. I didn't realize how many possibilities there were.

It would have been easier to do this when she was more symptomatic. I guess nothing else is easy with Lyme either.

You people are the best when it comes helping out. Smartest most informed group I have seen concerning this disease.

Many thanks.

Dan

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Tincup
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Hey Dan,

There are over 300 known strains and the list is growing at a regular pace.

Once in the host a strain can change forms and become something else.

A tick can harbor many strains and pass along none, some or all.

In Minnesota they've recently found a new strain- and have named it after the Hold The Mayo Clinic- of all rotten things to do. It is called Borrelia mayonii.

Most strains, other than B. burgdorferi, can not be picked up on standard tests.

Examples- there are approximately 50 strains of B. afzelii, most commonly detected in European and other countries than the USA. There are approximately 30 known B. garinii strains. Also considered more prominent in other countries.

Here is a list that will give you an idea of the various species/strains. I am pretty sure the list is not complete.

http://www.bacterio.net/borrelia.html

Hope that helps!

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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D Bergy
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"Most strains, other than B. burgdorferi, can not be picked up on standard tests."

That would also explain the lack of a positive Lyme test.

The other strain hypothesis is making more sense all the time.

Dan

Posts: 2915 | From Minnesota | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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