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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Food/Eating Plan

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Author Topic: Food/Eating Plan
me
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So, I've posted something to this effect before, but wasn't really able to find a solution that works for me, although I did get some kind and thoughtful replies.

I keep hearing that people who get well are gluten free, dairy free, yeast free and sugar free. Do people who do not follow this plan still get well?

I've got the gluten and casein free down. Yeast and sugar free is a huge hurdle. I can't seem to do it for the life of me. I had a bad eating disorder many, many years ago, and any time I try to also go yeast and sugar free it backfires and I waste money and I'm mad at myself and so on and so on.

So, my two questions are:

1. Do people who eat only gluten and casein free still get well, or do you have to go all out and do yeast and sugar Freetown to get well?

2. How in the world can I make this work for me. I still have a tough relationship with food and restricting certain foods from my diet always is a disastrous fail. Any brilliant ideas?

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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momintexas
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I think it depends on what underlying issues may be going on.

I did a very strict candida diet, lost 20 lbs and my candida numbers went up.

I am seeing new Drs and we are trying a different approach.

The thought of eliminating even more foods is extremely daunting to me. What else can I eat??

I am having a food sensitivity test done next week. I have leaky gut as well as candida.

We are going to temporarily eliminate the foods I show sensitive to. (I'm already off gluten and dairy).

We are focusing on parasite treatment and rebuilding my gut health.

I have been advised that once my gut is healed, the food sensitivity issues should stop.

I totally understand the apprehension about food restriction. I just have to tell myself that this is temporary is needed to restore my gut.

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Keebler
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-
http://lymeconnection.org/news_publications/meet_the_lyme_disease_experts.html/title/the-lyme-diet-dr-nicola-mcfadzean

The Lyme Diet -Interview with Dr. NIcola McFadzean

KEY CONCEPTS OF THE DIET DISCUSSSED - & the benefits, of course, the many benefits


https://www.amazon.com/Lyme-Diet-Nutritional-Strategies-Healing/dp/0982513836

Book: The Lyme Diet - 2010

Dr. NIcola McFadzean


https://www.amazon.com/Lyme-Brain-Impact-Disease-Reclaim/dp/0988243776/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1483212737&sr=1-2

Lyme Brain: The Impact of Lyme Disease on Your Brain, and How To Reclaim Your Smarts – July 28, 2016

by Dr. Nicola McFadzean Ducharme ND


http://recipesforrepair.com/

RECIPES FOR REPAIR

The book; the diet; recipes; videos

With Gail’s culinary talents, years in the industry and nurturing personality, it was natural for Gail to develop delicious, nutritious recipes for her daughter’s health and recovery process when Laura first discovered and wanted to try the Lyme Inflammation Diet.

Shortly after trying some of her mom’s recipes, Laura came up with an idea to combine their unique skills to create collaborative cookbook specific to the diet and the concept of Recipes for Repair was born!:


- LOOK FOR ANY UPDATES as time goes on. I think there are newer editions out now.
-

[ 01-30-2018, 04:58 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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-
http://www.mushroomfestival.org/mushroom-soup-cook-off-2

Amateur Mushroom Soup Cook-Off


GINGER sauteed in with veggies can aid digestion and add fabulous flavor. Just not too much too late in the day as it can be a bit stimulating for some.

Books:

THE CURE IS IN THE KITCHEN

A SPOONFUL OF GINGER

and

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1936608677/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1936608677&linkCode=as2&tag=glufrecat-20

LADLED: NOURISHING SOUPS FOR ALL SEASONS

- by Kimberly Harris (December 18, 2012)

over 75 reader reviews, a near perfect composite 5 star rating.

One reader notes: "Conducive to almost all specialty diets out there! GAPS, Paleo, vegetarian, gluten free, dairy free, real food......you name it, you will find a lot on this book for you."
-

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Keebler
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-
https://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Free-Asian-Kitchen-Recipes-Dumplings/dp/158761135X

GLUTEN FREE ASIAN KITCHEN Cookbook
-

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Keebler
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-
Vegetables and naturally gluten free foods that act like grains (quinoa, millet . . . black, red and wild rice . . . amaranth) are often easy on stomach action / digestion.

In moderation, with other foods and mostly veggies, all these can work even for those battling candida - as can key low glycemic fruits such as berries, even cherries.

Vegetables should carry every meal and every snack, though. There are delicious ways to actually enjoy foods you may never have considered. The plant kingdom is vast.

http://www.pbs.org/thebotanyofdesire/

PBS

Read / watch: Michael Pollan's "Botany of Desire"

This is a real "turn on" to live foods.


Tofu is a protein that is easily digestible and has many benefits. Other legumes, too.

Meats cooked more tender but - most of all - organic and non-GMO meats are much easier to digest. If cost is an issue, increasing the volume of vegetables helps round it out.

REAL FOOD is what matters most - and finding delicious ways to prepare, of course. Spices, seasonings and culinary herbs can make or break a meal.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/03/science-compared-every-diet-and-the-winner-is-real-food/284595/

Science Compared Every Diet, and the Winner Is Real Food

Researchers asked if one diet could be crowned best in terms of health outcomes. If diet is a set of rigid principles, the answer is a decisive no. In terms of broader guidelines, it's a decisive yes.

. . . "A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention." . . . .

. . . In it, they compare the major diets of the day:

Low carb, low fat, low glycemic, Mediterranean, mixed/balanced (DASH), Paleolithic, vegan, and elements of other diets.

Despite the pervasiveness of these diets in culture and media, Katz and Meller write, "There have been no rigorous, long-term studies comparing contenders for best diet laurels using methodology that precludes bias and confounding.

For many reasons, such studies are unlikely." They conclude that no diet is clearly best, but there are common elements across eating patterns that are proven to be beneficial to health.

"A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention."
-

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Keebler
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-
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=096457;p=0

Brewers Yeast - a valuable addition with some key probiotics

My best afternoon snack: Tofu crumbles, brewers yeast, sea salt, garlic powder, chives, and rinsed organic frozen peas. Takes barely anytime to thaw for a cool pick-me-up.
-

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Keebler
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-
For those with gut issues,

h pylori

should be assessed, it's an infection that can lead to ulcers, etc. and can be treated with very specific methods.

&

- not at all related but a separate issue to consider:

PORPHYRIA also should be considered. There are over 11 different kinds and tests are not that easy. A urine test is never enough and only one or two kinds of porphyria will affect urine color.

Many Rx can trigger porphyria attacks as can common chemicals.


http://www.porphyriafoundation.com/

THE AMERICAN PORPHYRIA FOUNDATION


http://www.cpnhelp.org/secondary_porphyria_what_

Secondary Porphyria: what you should know before starting a CAP [for Cpn, Chlamydia Pneumonia]

[Cpn has a similar treatment protocol as that of lyme. And many with lyme may also have Cpn, yet, IMO, those with lyme might also develop a secondary porphyria.

There are healthy ways, though, to achieve a high carb diet that can help prevent porphyria damage. One can still eat carbs and not have candida go bonkers. Carbs from nature, that is.

Chlorella & Spirulina are essential to control porphyria, too.
-

[ 01-30-2018, 05:02 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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-
I've had a lot to trouble with mouth ulcers over the years. I found this most helpful when I could not stand solid foods:


Mushroom soup

Roast: mushrooms, onions, garlic . . . carrots

and then cook in rice cooker: black / wild rice.

After all have cooled - or even the next day from the fridge, add with

lemon myrtle tea (Strand Tea in Oregon) and seasonings and just puree it in a good strong blender to consistency of one's choosing.

Can eat chilled or warmed.

----------------

Bean soup / dip / just food to get food in

After cooking beans, add in roasted carrots, sautéed onions, garlic, ginger,

black / wild rice

seasonings (rosemary, thyme or even Herbs de Provence work well if you like the lavender hint)

lemon myrtle tea

and puree. Store in small glass jars. Can freeze, top it with a little olive oil first.

When serving, can eat cold or warm, add a little more olive oil.
-

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Keebler
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-
Also good for tender tummies: QUINOA FLAKES - which have a surprisingly good glycemic index as they are so packed with good protein.

Just add boiling water to the flakes in a deep mug and cover for a few minutes.

But, really, an organic potato or yam / carrots can also be wonderful nutrition and easy on the stomach, too. And much more affordable. Potatoes are surprising. Like eggs and real butter, they are coming back into favor for their goodness.
-

[ 01-30-2018, 05:25 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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me
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Wow, thanks MominTexas and Keebler. Y'all are amazing, as always.

My biggest issues are not having energy to cook and the former eating disorder really makes it difficult to cut certain foods out--really difficult. I don't know how to get around those two issues.

Keebler--I will check out "Botany of Desire." Thanks for the suggestion. Maybe that can help? It's definitely worth a try.

I just can't figure out how to get around the two big issues mentioned above?

Thanks so much Keebler and MominTexas.

Keebler, So nice to see you here again. I hope the construction is calming down.

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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SickSam
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When I'm too weak to get to the fridge to get food, I eat nuts and seeds. My doc wants his patients to eat nuts and seeds for a meal anyway. Maybe that could help you some. My favorites are cashews, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds.
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me
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Thank you, Sammy. I need to start a list of super easy foods like this.

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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Tincup
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Mason Jar Salads. I love it. You can make enough of them on Sunday to last all week. See more info at the link below.

And they can have what ever you can eat in them, they are ready for lunches at work, or can be left at home so when you get back your supper is ready and waiting.

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/3/35848?

I add cans of beans- various kinds- nuts, seeds, spring onions, garlic (can be rather strong by end of week), tomatoes, cucumbers, cheeses, squashes, boiled eggs, shredded carrots, etc.

You can use a lemon/vinegar dressing you make, or do like me...

I use Maria's dressings because they are healthier, and I don't want to make my own dressings- too much work on top of everything else.

Sometimes I make a healthy coleslaw and put it in with lettuce, tomato chunks, etc. or make a 3 bean salad just for variety.

I use can tomatoes (not whole or crushed- the in between kind) because they taste much better than store bought WINTER tomatoes.

While you put together your salads- I buy whole cooked chickens (on rotisserie) and cut it up for the salads ($5.00 or less at Walmart and very healthy and yummy)- you can also toss a pot roast and some carrots, onions, etc. in a crock pot and turn it on before you leave for work on Monday morning.

You'll have enough fresh cooked meat for a few days and can freeze the rest in individual ziplock for later.

Or a big pot of soup- doing it the same way or cooking it on the stove while making salads. Or chili, or spaghetti sauce.

The mason jar salads are fine for at least 5 days stored in the mason jars, possibly a day or two longer, but I'd rather not push it.

Of course my favorite mason jar meals are in the jars I stuff chocolate cake and ice cream in.

[lol]

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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Tincup
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Oh, and talk about nuts...

I put the chunky hard ones in a small ziplock bag and crush them with a hammer, using the pieces and powder on top of my salads.

I'm sure there is some fancy gadget for crushing the nuts, but that works for me.

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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Tincup
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OK, OK. I cheat sometimes, but I am not suppose to be gluten free.

I use the crispy onions like you make green bean casserole with- in place of croutons. They have some wheat in them, but so what.

[Big Grin]

--------------------
www.TreatTheBite.com
www.DrJonesKids.org
www.MarylandLyme.org
www.LymeDoc.org

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me
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Adding mason jar salads to easy meal list. I like the ideas of crushing nuts on top. Thanks, Tincup.

I'm starting an easy meal and easy snack list.

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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me
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I'm wondering if I'm being too strict and that is one thing that is overwhelming me? For example, a rotisserie chicken would be easy to add to things. But if I look at the ingredients at the store, it has sugar and yeast, so then I think, "Nope, can't do that."

So it's an all or nothing thing and then I decide I can't do it because then I have to cook chicken to add to the whatever I make, for example.

I guess that would be better than eating a sandwich with gluten free bread and processed meat though? Or would it be the same?

I'm so stuck here.

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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Keebler
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-
It might be helpful to identify the barriers to cooking? Do you have the right sized pan that you can lift to bake a half chicken?

Sometimes, it's something that simple - just getting the right equipment, practicing the moves.

A covered pot will keep it moist. Leave the skin on when roasting and then use the skin with the bones for broth later.

Store bought hot chickens are awash in some very serious chemicals from the plastic container they sit in. They may not be gluten free, either, that can vary store to store and depending upon the workspace in which they are prepared.
-

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unsure445
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I'm sure its possible to get better while eating wheat, dairy, and sugar but I imagine it would take longer/slow things down.

My husband was definitely not free of these and he has been in remission for quite a while from Lyme and Bartonella but he was not terribly sick and has an amazing immune system.

I think it also depends how sick and symptomatic you are. I read a blog where the person stated they recovered from late stage Lyme having a glass of wine nightly, no idea how this would be possible....

Look up low carb paleo recipes (this means grain free) and you will be surprised what you can make with some substitutions such as almond flour and stevia.

Having foods prepared ahead of time makes eating this way much easier; hard boiled eggs, roasted vegetables, broiled chicken etc...

--------------------
unsure445

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TF
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When I was treating lyme, I would buy a rotisserie chicken at the store. It is basically chicken, so it is OK.

I didn't worry about little added bits of "forbidden" ingredients.

So, for example, I ate lunch at the company cafeteria. I ate whatever meat and vegetables they were serving.

If they were only serving pasta, then I got a chicken salad or tuna salad sandwich with lettuce and tomato and tossed the bread away.

I didn't worry about little bits of ingredients. (I would not eat breaded chicken, because the breading is substantial.)

I used the salad dressings at the salad bar. I just didn't use one that was honey.

So, you don't have to be so very strict.

I basically ate meat and non-starchy vegetables. They had all kinds of spices on them and various sauces. Just don't eat any really sweet sauces.

You don't have the energy to cook everything from scratch.

If I got breakfast at work, it was eggs and bacon or other breakfast meat.

I did NOT eat potatoes. bread, pasta, pancakes, cake, rice, cookies, cereal, sugar or sugar-high foods, etc. since the main ingredient in these foods is flour or starch (which quickly turns to sugar) and also a lot of sugar.

I made pancakes from almond flour on occasion.

You do the best you can. But, don't reject a rotisserie chicken because of some little bit of yeast or very small amount of sugar.

I ate sugar-free (plain) yogurt and kefir. I did not eat fruit. But, you could eat a few berries at the end of a meal.

My doc said you could also eat a little bit of brown rice once per week. I didn't bother. I just used quinoa as my rice/pasta.

Coffee is OK as long as it doesn't interfere with your sleep. I was already a decaf person, so I just drank decaf tea and coffee as usual.

So, go out and eat at restaurants and order carry out food also. Just don't let forbidden ingredients be anything other than a bit player in the meals you choose.

The goal of the diet, as I understand it, is to avoid having candida while you treat lyme disease and afterward. Some docs believe it is unavoidable. They aim to keep it to a low level while treating and then restore the gut (meaning, get you candida free) after your treatment is finished.

See p. 34 of Burrascano. It is called "MANAGING YEAST OVERGROWTH" and "YEAST CONTROL DIET." So, the diet is just to avoid/limit yeast which can end up making a person as sick as lyme disease in some cases.

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Phoiph
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Hi me...

The truth is, you will not become truly well until your gut is in balanced, sealed, and healed. It simply has to be a main focus.

IMO, you might benefit from a more structured, graded plan, that may start out more restrictive but becomes more lenient as your gut health improves. This would take the decisions and guesswork out of it for you.

I would suggest looking into the Body Ecology Diet as a possibility:

http://bodyecology.com/the-body-ecology-diet-book.html

http://bodyecology.com/aboutbed.php

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Keebler
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-
It's important to be assessed for CELIAC so that you can determine if even a trace of gluten is too much (as it is for those with celiac).

Then you will better know how to proceed with that aspect, anyway.
-

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me
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Thank you so much, TF and Phoiph.

Tf, the info you provided helped a lot. I've spent forever in stores agonizing over every little ingredient. This helps.

Phoiph-- thank you so much for the info and links. Question: I didn't see examples of recipes, so it's hard to gauge if the body ecology diet would work for me due to limited time and energy. Is it more of a nutritional informative book, or does it have recipes? If it has recipes, are they super quick and simple?

Thanks again.

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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HW88
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I'm reading the wahls protocol book right now. I'll let you know if I feel like it's worth trying.
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me
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Awesome, HW88. You rock!

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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TF
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Here is a recipe from Body Ecology for a hot breakfast cereal. I ate this nearly every morning when treating lyme.

It tastes so good, you may want to eat it for snacks also.

http://bodyecology.com/recipes/porridge.php

If you like it, make a double batch. Then, put it in one serving containers. Then, you will have breakfast ready for the next 4 days.

Just microwave it and eat!

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Phoiph
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quote:
Originally posted by me:
Phoiph-- thank you so much for the info and links. Question: I didn't see examples of recipes, so it's hard to gauge if the body ecology diet would work for me due to limited time and energy. Is it more of a nutritional informative book, or does it have recipes? If it has recipes, are they super quick and simple?

Thanks again.

Me...

Here's a link to some sample recipes. There is also a cookbook (featured on that page).

You would still need to follow the step by step program to determine which recipes you could use at which phase of the program.

http://bodyecology.com/articles/recipes/

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Brussels
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I didn't read all posts above.

I got rid of chronic lyme with multiple re-infections in between.

Food-wise, what helped me most was an allergy free diet. I felt that cutting allergens was a key to help healing my body.

I tested energetically all foods that caused me harm (allergy, reactions).


-----------------------
If I had to re-do it all again, I would have also stopped gluten.

I don't have lyme anymore, but I do feel so much more energetic after stopping gluten.

gluten is way too hard to digest, and has no nutritional function. It just makes things hard for your body.

The amount of gluten in wheat is huge. About 1/3 of the bread, pasta, pizza is simply: glue! Gluten!

Only when you stop it for a couple of months you may feel the difference: but it's clear.

My daughter stopped catching colds and viruses at school from the MOMENT she stopped gluten.

I had ZERO idea that gluten was DIRECTLY involved in messing her immune system. since June last year, she is cold free (before, she stayed home almost once a week, if not more, due to some infectious bug).
-----------------------


Candida does not bulge with strict diet, in my opinion.

It will get worse if you exaggerate on sugar /carb / fruits, for sure. But cutting these, is zero warranty of cure or even improvement (in my experience).

Just diminish the amount of sugar /gluten, if you can.

I always ate cow milk products, but now I am only consuming goat and sheep products (except for butter).

I don't think to stop all yeast will do any good (in my opinion). We need yeast/ candida to survive, so why cutting it off?

All fresh fruits and veggies are covered with candida. Many are beneficial.


Beer is known to have many healing properties (see Buhner). Maybe some people react badly to it? I never did any yeast-free diet.

In fact, I'm fermenting things home and forcing myself to eat these live foods to cure my candida.

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Brussels
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If you can't diminish the amount of 'bad foods' (because your brain jungles with you), there is still the way of the samurai!

That means, fasting. [Wink]


Fast as much as you can (even if it is for 6 hours a day). You can increase the time slowly.

Fasting is one of the easiest way to deal with food addiction.

Or do the Suddarshan Kriya course . It's weekend yoga course.

I swear, it works for many people (specially for addictions), just one weekend of your life, and a life-change for many.

No need to know about yoga, meditation, nothing.


Some people fast just by eating once a day.

if you are able to fast for a week, I swear that it changed profoundly some of my very old ingrained food habits, the pattern of hunger etc.


when the food controls you (like white sugar, alcohol, gluten may control you), it's time to stop that cycle.


When you can't control what you eat, it means there are substances in the food that are addictive.

It means, they harm your brain!


Some scientists did research on sugar with mice. When they finally stop giving sugar to the mice, they collapsed like a drug addict may collapse.

It's REAL addiction, not imaginary.
Even the mice collapsed.

It damages the brain cells, literally.
It's not your fault!


In my opinion, it's hard to stop eating one targeted thing at a time, for some people.


The easiest way is to stop eating for good (fasting), then your brain has no chance to jungle with you

....(like pushing you to eat more of the forbidden target instead of the good options like a carrot...).

Take control back, because that is valid not only for food, but for other addictive habits.

In my lyme journey, I know that taking control of many things in our hands (not only food) is essential for healing.

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Winter Park
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Rotisserie chicken is good. I never get sick of it. There is a Greek restaurant near me that makes it with no seasonings. Maybe olive oil, salt and pepper. Sides there are healthy too. Green beans and zucchini in tomatoes. I can't have the spanakopita until I take a break from the diet. Sometimes I'll get kalamata olives and one or two greek peppers.
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Christopher J
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I tried all of that sugar free, gluten free, nuts and seeds stuff for a while and realized ultimately that nothing worked for me like Ray Peat's recommendations. I 100% cut off ALL PUFA fats. No nuts, no seed oils, no vegetable oils, no fish oils. Plenty of low fat organic milk and fruits. And thats it. And I made tremendous progress on Lyme symptom reduction. I have mentioned before that a skim milk fast virtually disables Lyme disease and that still works for me if I do it exclusively. These days, I have a nutribullet,I have organic frozen fruits (mangos, cherries, etc) and I have skim milk, and thats all I eat. Never any added fats.
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me
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Thank you so much to everyone who has contributed to this thread. I really appreciate your help.

--------------------
Just sharing my experiences, opinions, and what I've read and learned. Not medical advice.

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Keebler
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-
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/112235?#000000

Topic: Borrelia / TBD / mycoplasma / chronic stealth infection Weight Gain?

Understanding some of what's going on, why . . . And What Can Help.


Re: Food Additives

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=029690;p=0

Excitotoxins; MSG; Aspartame; & "Natural" Flavors (that are not likely natural at all).

GMO foods that destroy the GI Tract; Gluten; Dairy.
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Keebler
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Just adding some links to use this as a reference thread. Others are welcome, too.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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