LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Fipronil = Frontline against mites = egg contamination

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Fipronil = Frontline against mites = egg contamination
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If Frontline (= Fipronil) is poisonous for men, and a forbidden product to be used in any animal that produces food (eggs, meat, milk), what it is doing to our dogs and cats?

The European egg crisis must be not only European.

I'm pretty sure other countries are using this insecticide against red mites in chicken, due to recent red mite infestation.

It's just that here, control looks tighter than in most countries, that is why someone found this specific insecticide in eggs.

Not only birds from big farms are being attacked by red mites (8 legged blood suckers) but also any exploitation of chicken could be affected.

Even organic farms, individual families raising chickens... And to eliminate such mites is hell.

You can spray insecticides, kill all your chickens, burn what can be burnt, red mites still come back to infect the next batch of chickens you buy.

The fipronil crisis show how much infestation from mites is going on here in Europe.

It is also probably following the same reasons infestation of ticks is increasing. This year it was pretty bad in spring.

Red mites look like tiny nymph ticks, and suck the blood very similarly to ticks. They are so tiny, and also 8 legged, that it is hard to see the difference (only if you have good eyes, you can spot it).

They are red, but some ticks have reddish colors too, so well, it's hard to see the difference.

And pretty sure, their nymphs must be even smaller than tick nymphs, so almost impossible to see any difference.

and yes, they bite humans too, the same way ticks do!

You can bet red mites transmit pathogens such as Borrelia burgdorferi.

******************
http://www.lymedisease.org.au/transmission/

Borrelia burgdorferi was identified in 13 species of mites, 15 species of flies and two species fleas.Pokornỳ P. 1989,

Incidence of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi in arthopods (Arthropoda) and antibodies in vertebrates (Vertebrata), Cesk Epidemiol Mikrobiol Imunol. 38(1):52-60.

**********************

13 mite species infected with Borrelia in 1989. Very old study. You can guess that the situation did not improve, but got worse.

that raises the question: are we eating chicken meat with Borrelia since 1989? Eggs with Bb?

Mites make the birds anemic, they lay less eggs, do not gain weight fast, and can even kill birds.

There was a person in another lyme forum, in the US I think, who said he had a bird nest at his window sill. The little birds all died after being sucked by mites. He cleaned the sill, put all sorts of chemical insecticides in the room, the mites still invaded his whole house.

He had to leave his house, after using too many insecticides (and still mites were there), he threw all his possessions off, moved to a camping van, but his body was still being bitten by mites. He is now homeless, and smears petroleum on his body and sleeps on plastic sheets, but still, mites are biting him.

Sort of desperate situation...

A local family exploitation of chickens in France describe a similar situation. No matter what they do, the mites are still there.


Sapiens is trying to fight that back with fipronil the same way we try to get our pets free from fleas and ticks with Frontline.

Maybe that would solve the mite problem, but an insecticide in chicken meat and eggs will probably make our immune systems even weaker.

I don't know how you all see the problem of chemicals 'helping' sapiens.

I don't see chemicals helping sapiens. I only see nature fighting us back, in spite of chemicals.

I wonder if Sapiens will finally lose its supremacy to insects....

Just rambling...

Posts: 6185 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Illegal fipronil contaminating eggs in Europe
Posts: 6185 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
windingshores
Member
Member # 48600

Icon 1 posted      Profile for windingshores     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I may have been the poster who suffered a mite infestation from a bird's nest. I had to move after throwing out all my possessions, and went from motel to motel, sleeping on plastic, using all kinds of products on myself, my car and my environment.

However, I do believe that those who suffer mites for years, who have taken proper precautions and done protocols, are suffering from a neurological and/or brain based condition. Mainly consisting of crawling and biting sensations.

Logically I realized that if live critters were, indeed, living in my pores and hair, that I would at some point see an adult. I had various strength magnifying glasses.

After two or three months, I could still see brownish mottled things come out of my pores after a night with petroleum jelly on my legs. But that stopped.

For the last months I have changed my attitude toward NOT believing these sensations are actually from mites crawling, and have dropped my protocols and stayed in one place, furnished normally.

I am making a lot of progress with either reducing or not noticing the sensations and feel a lot of relief. I also do a lot of Tai Chi.

So if anyone is reading this and experiencing it, don't get angry at the suggestion that it is "all in your head." In some ways, it may be.

People do get Lyme from mites, and Morgellons. I am not seeking antibiotic treatment because I have been there for 6 years a decade ago and cannot tolerate them. And I don't seem to need them at this point.

Posts: 53 | From Massachusetts | Registered: Aug 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
So glad you are finding ways to deal with the problem!

I've been thinking about your poster these last weeks, because I had been bitten by invisible beasts causing me blisters, specially if I scratch.

I thought we could SEE mites, but I suppose we can't see them all, right?

I mean, the small nymphs are probably not very visible, right?

I kept searching for what was biting me, and every day, got about 3 bites, that looked bad. Nothing like fleas, or mosquitoes, but tiny bites that produced blisters.

When I read your post, I decided to put all my clothes in the freezer for many days.

When I wore them again, I was out of my house, in vacations. The biting stopped. For good.

2 weeks later, I came back home, the bites re-started. The hell is that I can't see anything attached to my skin!

So I froze the clothes again, and am now spraying Bugrepel (essential oils) on clothes and bedcloth, just in case.

My neighbors had chicken for so long, but they stopped suddenly. Two neighbors stopped raising chickens after more than a decade raising them.

Then suddenly, I hear about this Fipronil egg contamination problem, and red mite infestation...

Gosh, I gotta ask them why they stopped.

I have tick infestation around the place I live, in Switzerland.
it's been like that for years.

But I can SEE ticks, even nymphs. I have no problem with them, as i can do something because I see them.

I no longer have lyme, and despite frequent bites, so far, lyme does not come back.

I fully agree on your approach to natural treatments. It's the only way out, if you live in endemic areas.

And imagine these mites, that have Bb too... and mosquitoes...

And very probably, BED MITES!!!

so I guess, we can't live on constant anxiety, so I thought all was under control, until I got these invisible critters biting me.

thanks for the tip of meditation. I'm going to try to remove that anxiety (that your poster had raised [Wink] ) off.

The problem with the damn mites is that I'm starting to freak out, as I can't see the enemy!

so does it mean, they can reproduce, spread, take your whole house under control and you can barely see the enemy?

I'm sooo glad you posted, and that things are moving to the good side again for you.

Posts: 6185 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
windingshores
Member
Member # 48600

Icon 1 posted      Profile for windingshores     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
You can see adult mites, at least bird mites.

In my experience, you only see bites the first night. Mites inject something that prevents the kind of inflammation that makes bites visible.

You may have something else. How close are your neighbor's old chicken houses?

Freezing doesn't work. A hot dryer is better.

Posts: 53 | From Massachusetts | Registered: Aug 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
https://poultrykeeper.com/blog/will-red-mite-infest-your-house/

Own house infestation with red mites:


Here are some extracts from a comment received from Laura in Ireland for example that really made me think I should investigate this further:

“We haven had a serious mite infestation for the last 6 weeks in our own house brought in probably by the dogs and ourselves, as we were all very scratchy all over and definitely getting bitten by them and no amount of scrubbing would remove them.”


and she went on to say


“…I would really like to know if there is anyone on this blog that has had their own home and body infested and how they dealt with it.

We are getting a steamer for the houses and are praying for a very cold winter to kill them off and going to keep our heating off, but so far vets and doctors have very little knowledge about these new breed of red mites that definitely reproduce on and bite humans.

It is frightening if this strain of red mite really takes affect in the UK and Ireland, as it is very nasty, tough and reproduces at a bionic rate.”


So there does appear to be a problem here.

Laura seemed to think that this was a different type of red mite that would bite humans so I decided to go to the experts at the University of Newcastle to find out more.


Dr George (now with the University of Lancaster) has been studying Red Mite and told me this:


“With regard to red mite feeding upon humans, it seems that this is actually more common than once thought.

An increasing number of reports in the academic press are identifying cases of this, where red mite have also been found to infest other mammals (including rats and horses).

In my opinion it’s likely that this has always been the case, but that such infestations have ‘traditionally’ been misdiagnosed.

That said, I’ve never personally been bitten and I suspect that avian hosts are more preferred by the mites, where they may nevertheless take a meal on an alternative host if desperate.

The ‘deserted birds nest in the attic’ is a classic case of this, where red mites (and other avian mites) are forced to leave the nest after the young birds have fledged – often encountering a human meal as they do so!”

------------------------------
IDEAS TO TREAT INFESTATION

Newcastle University are testing different essential oils since these contain chemicals toxic to pests.

For example, linalool from lavender is toxic to red mites. Their latest research shows that red mite mortality rates decrease with time – so the oils need to be fresh to work.


My granddad used to hang fresh Lavender bunches in his pigeon loft and I thought it was to keep the loft smelling fresh!


The female red mite lays her eggs after a feed.

There is also evidence though from Newcastle University that the acaricidal effect (killing power) of essential oils increases as mites are starved for longer periods of time so could covering yourself in an insect repellent preventing them feeding for a few days whilst treating your house may help to knock down more mites?


Diatom is safe and can be used in the house – dust cracks and crevices – the good news is it will hoover up without leaving a mess afterwards.


Eat more garlic! The locals in Charente, France where I sometimes stay eat a lot of garlic and say it stops the mosquitos biting them (and Vampires?)…


I give my birds crushed garlic (2 or 3 cloves) in their water to keep them healthy and I am sure this is why I have had far fewer problems with red mite this year.

Posts: 6185 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
The chicken coops are not far: their hens sometimes walk around in my own garden, when they escape.

Both coops are just a few meters from my home.

I haven't asked them yet... I just found that blog above, and that made me less anxious.

It seems people get scratch all over but they also do not see the mites. I got just about 10 bites maximum, and the bites are very clear.

Certainly not fleas or mosquitoes, because I know how they look (they do not cause me blisters).

Anyway...

Dr. George from Lancaster University says it's common to have infestation from bird nests in the attic of houses! Like your case.


What is crazy in all that is how insects move in human areas (because in fact, we first moved into their territories, most of the times) and then change hosts!

Thanks for the freezing tip. The guy in the blog said the same: freezing does not work.

I don't have a drier...

What I did this week was a 5-sided approach:
- vacuumed the whole house, beds, couches ...

- washed all bed sheets, used clothes.
I let them soak inside the washing machine with water, soap and vinegar for at least 12 hours before washing them.

- dried all clothes under hot sun for the whole day; I also put duvets and pillows under the sun for the whole day. Also carpets.

- I'm ironing all clothes, bed cloths, one by one.

- I sprayed Bugrepel in my bedroom, sheets, mattress, duvets, and pillows for 2 days.

It's fully natural, only essential oils. It works well against ticks, mosquitoes.

As it is not an infestation yet, I hope, I did not do more than that.

So far, no new bites.


They say their life lasts 7 days.

If in a month, I get no bites, they must be gone, I hope. And I do think you are right, it's not red mites, but something else.

What freaked me is that I could no see the bugs.

Posts: 6185 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
Moderator
Member # 743

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Lymetoo     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Good job, windingshores!

Hope you are finished with them, Brussels!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 94527 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 13480

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Brussels     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Me too!

I got though a new tick bite yesterday, number 7 this year... the damn tiny nymph stayed the whole night attached... [Frown]

Autumn is coming, I suppose? I got a tick-break of a few weeks, but lower temperatures and rains are bringing the ticks again.

I keep receiving reports here that this year, 2017, is a bad year for tick infestation in Europe, due to mild winter.


Funnily, I got more scared about the mite story than more tick bites, because I cannot see what was biting me.

So far, bites stopped, so I'm crossing fingers.

but as I said, it was probably not mite, because I clearly see the stings, one by one.

Next time I find one bite, I'll try to look through a magnifying glass before I scratch the bite.

Posts: 6185 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
minimonkey
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 8693

Icon 1 posted      Profile for minimonkey     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My understanding is that it is a different type of mite that infests birds versus mammals.... we had an infestation of rats a while back, and they carried red mites which bit us quite a lot, causing really painful red bites that lasted for months. They were apparently rat mites, which affect mammals. They supposedly can't survive on human hosts alone, but they sure can make one miserable for a while.

Bird mites are also red (after feeding they are red-- before feeding they are tiny and grey) -- and I don't think they often infest humans -- though they will crawl on you and even contact from them is pretty itchy. You can use ivermectin on birds and it will kill the mites, but you do need to do several rounds of it at the right intervals, and also use spray on the roosts, etc. They are hard to eliminate, but it can be done. I've been doing bird rescue (often feral birds... pigeons and doves) for many years, and have had a few run-ins with bird mites during that time. They never seemed to take much of a liking to biting humans -- but the rat mites certainly did!

--------------------
"Looks like freedom but it feels like death..
It's something in between, I guess"

Leonard Cohen, from the song "Closing Time"

Posts: 822 | From California | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to the Terms and Conditions.

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.