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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » are there any websites that talk about whether turpentine harms gut flora?

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Author Topic: are there any websites that talk about whether turpentine harms gut flora?
GVS
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I'm on my usual 10 years + quest to get a handle on parasites, am probably heading toward a fecal transplant for c. diff., and am looking for an anti-parasitic agent that doesn't harm gut flora because I don't want to undo the good of the implant.

Turpentine (pine oil) is a potential candidate, but only if it doesn't harm gut flora.

Thanks,
GVS

Posts: 242 | From durham, nc | Registered: Oct 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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No way I would do that. Just myself. Nope.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95344 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lyme248
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Have you tried Hulda Clark's parasite cleanse? It works really well for a lot of people. I did a parasite cleanse from Keavy's Corner, but I wouldn't recommend it if you've had problems with other treatments. Someone else tried on of the herb mixture pills and felt really sick. I think the main ingredients are very easy to tolerate though, and you can get them in powders from Mountain Rose Herbs.

Brenda Cosentino has a blog called Real Food Rebel, and she has a recipe for a parasite cleanse, and a list of parasite-fighting foods.

Most of the parasite cleanses have:

Wormwood
Clove
Black Walnut
and Garlic
I think these are the ones that actually kill the parasites.

Some add sweet wormwood, fennel seed, milk thistle or dandelion root. Andrographis is also supposed to be good for parasites, but it can have side effects. I'm pretty sure herbs don't harm the intestinal flora.

Ecclectic Institute makes a formula called Intestinal Health that is good too, but it wasn't strong enough for me.

I think I got rid of all my parasites using the above ingredients. It took a while, though to find the right combination.

I hope this helps.

--------------------
chronic Lyme/Bartonella

Inside every sick person is a well person waiting to be freed

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ukcarry
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I have read a couple of times that it doesn't, but can't remember the source, or indeed how reliable it is.
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Keebler
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-
To be clear:

Turpentine can kill you. Should not be taken in any form, any amount. Ever. It is also extremely flammable. Even the fumes are flammable.

It thins oil paint & takes paint off brushes, etc. Think about what that can do to tender human tissue.

It can take the lining right off your esophagus, gut and cause tears and holes. But the main thing is that it's a potentially deadly poison / neurotoxin.

It should not even be inhaled. Painters who use it require the best ventilation, even then fumes can make them very sick, even cause mental disturbances.

It there is any in the home / garage for painters' purposes, it should be stored very carefully & the container frequently checked for leaks - so as not to cause combustion. Rags that have any turpentine on them must be disposed of in a certain way, too, so as not to create spontaneous combustion.

All in all, turpentine is not likely anything most of us even want in our homes.
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
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I know a lady taking the D1 dilution of turpentine here in Switzerland! She's still very alive!

In fact, there were chewing gums made with turpentine, and turpentine has been ingested, and used as a medicine in China.

------------------------
HISTORY of TURPENTINE.

The primary use of turpentine has been as a solvent in paints.

During the last century, it became an important starting material for the commercial synthesis of many widely used compounds, including camphor and menthol.

Various products derived from turpentine have been used in chewing gums, and steam-distilled turpentine oil has been used as a food and beverage flavoring in very small quantities (typically about 20 ppm).


Turpentine and its related products have a long history of medicinal use primarily as topical counter-irritants for the treatment of rheumatic disorders and muscle pain.


A gum derived from turpentine was used in traditional Chinese medicine to relieve the pain of toothaches.


Other extracts (including the semi-synthetic derivative terpin hydrate) have been used for the treatment of cough and cold symptoms; 5 the cis-form of terpin hydrate is used as an expectorant. 6


https://www.drugs.com/npp/turpentine.html
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Keebler
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Yet there are so many better & safer ways.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lyme248
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I was thinking... Could it be possible that any benefits of turpentine (you say it's pine oil) could be coming from the pine resin? An older relative used to say that she chewed pine gum as a kid. Maybe there is some type of pine gum with health benefits? You would have to look into it more. I know I tried some by accident and it tasted nasty.

--------------------
chronic Lyme/Bartonella

Inside every sick person is a well person waiting to be freed

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Lymetoo
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Having a chemical sensitivity is miserable .. you don't want it, trust me.

Don't begin the path to nowhere.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95344 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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-
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turpentine

Turpentine

Excerpt:

. . . Hazards

As an organic solvent, its vapour can irritate the skin

and eyes,

damage the lungs and respiratory system,

as well as the central nervous system when inhaled,

and cause damage to the renal (kidney) system when ingested, among other things.[16]

Being combustible, it also poses a fire hazard.

Because turpentine can cause spasms of the airways particularly in people with asthma and whooping cough, it can contribute to a worsening of breathing issues in persons with these diseases if inhaled. . . .
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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