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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever ? Severe ? Is is Lyme ?

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Author Topic: Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever ? Severe ? Is is Lyme ?
digirl02
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A friend of mine's wife was diagnosed with Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - The rash is severe and I just googled up "RMSF and Lyme" and a ton of stuff is out there. I did send him to one of the CDC links (I know, I know) but this infection sounds like it is a very rare one - Rickesetti (sp?) -- Is it? Anyone know of doctor's, would they go to Infectious Disease or definitely a LLMD ? and any information I can relay to them. ? Thanks
Posts: 121 | From Gaithersburg, MD USA | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
trails
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LLMD and Infectious disease b/c some LLMDs dont know too much about RM spotted fever, but most do. I would ASK the doc "how many cases of RMSP have you successfully treated" before I would even make an appoint.

The rash IS severe and usually on hands and feet. Tiny rash...way different than lyme rash.

Have they been seen at ALL? photos of the rash? Blood work?

Both docs just to cover bases in my opinion.
Trails


Posts: 1950 | From New Mexico | Registered: Sep 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
janet thomas
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Doesn't RMSF require urgent care?

The same tick may have passed Lyme and other co-infections.


Posts: 2001 | From NJ | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pantsinsocks
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My titers were positive for RMSF, though I didnt have the rash and acute symptoms.
My LLMD is treating me for it, along with Lyme, Babesia, and mycoplasma.
My LLMD is in N. Va not too far from you, if you want to contact me directly to get contact info.
Since these tick diseases often travel together, and some can be masked, I think a good LLMD should be included in who who see.

Posts: 67 | From Fredericksburg, VA USA | Registered: Jun 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kara Tyson
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Rickettsiae are bacteria that cause several diseases. One is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever but also typhus and Q Fever.
Posts: 6022 | From Mobile, AL | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mo
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Bartonella is very similar to Rickettsiae.

I would be leary of going to any Doc who was only going to look at one or two TBD's.

I think at this point (sick, rash) all TBD's should be suspect.

Mo

[This message has been edited by Mo (edited 15 June 2005).]


Posts: 8337 | From the other shore | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tincup
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Anyone even suspected of having Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever should get to a doctor.. ANY doctor... ASAP!!!

Doxycycline should be started IMMEDIATELY if RMSF is even suspected.

Once the person is stable.. other doctors and diagnosises can be sought.

RMSF can kill people.. and the risk is higher to the individual the longer it goes untreated.

RMSF is endemic where you are.. and is not really "rare."

Rare or not.. it needs treatment right away.

Any lab is ok to use.. but NEVER wait for lab tests to come back.. treat IMMEDIATELY!


Posts: 20353 | From The Moon | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ALSLYME
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here is how serious i think it is - a friends brother had rmsf 12 years ago and was treated, then, a few years later he was dx with ALS (in his early 30's), yet never tested for LD or coinfections, and lived with that for 6 years. He just passed away a couple months ago.

GO TO A LLMD NOW! once again, I BELIEVE THE UNTREATED TICK-BORN DISEASE(S) CAUSED THE ALS condition.

Good Luck!


Posts: 94 | From Maryland, USA | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
digirl02
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thanks sooooo much.... i'm really nervous = haven't been able to reach him since yesterday early when he called for info.... mmmm - keep the info coming and i soo very much appreciate it. thanks, i'll keep you'll posted.... he is a very dear friend of mine.
Posts: 121 | From Gaithersburg, MD USA | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
brainless
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Yes, RMSF can be extremely dangerous AND you don't know what other TBDs you have.

b


Posts: 210 | From lalaland | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ConnieMc
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A woman in our community nearly died from RMSF. After she was misdiagnosed by an idiot ID doc, she got worse and worse, and finally ended up in the ER. Over the course of the next several weeks, she went through everything from organ failure to tissue damage. They did not think she would make it. She was in ICU for several weeks.

She has 4 kids!

She has major residual consequences. I have tried to talk her into going to my LLMD, as I think she probably has something else, but she just won't do it.

And this happened in a state that has the highest incidence of RMSF in the country! How in the world was this missed? She was ill for a couple of weeks and seeing doctors and the ID specialist. And none of them picked it up!

She never saw the tick!

Makes you think, huh?

This is to be taken very seriously. Tell your friend to seek competent help right away.


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Linda LD
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My nephew had RMSF. His Mom is a nurse and Dad a doctor--they lit out for Florida and just put the kid in the back set. I guess they noticed the rash in Georgia (kid had been wrapped in blankets and it was 99 degrees outside).

Doctor's at an Atlanta emergency room saved his life...

Oh yea, this is the brother that STILL doesn't believe in Lyme disease.

She needs to go to the closest ER.

L


Posts: 1171 | From Knoxville, TN US | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
laserred
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What is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?

Every spring ticks come out of hiding and begin their search for a blood meal. The ticks pass on a variety of possible diseases they may have picked up from one blood meal source to the next. These diseases include, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Tularemia and Ehrilichiosis.

Rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF) has been identified in seven persons living in Douglas County. Three identified tick bites prior to blood tests to confirm RMSF.

Prompt removal of ticks can decrease risk for contracting a disease. Prolonged tick attachment (more than 4 hours) increases the likelihood of disease. Ticks come in many sizes and people may not realize they have been bitten. Proper removal is just as important as prompt removal. Improper removal may cause disease organisms to be ``inoculated'' into the tissues and the tick body fluid may be forced into the site increasing the danger of infection.

The following is taken from a fact sheet provided by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Section for Communicable Disease Prevention.

What is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is usually spread to

people by the bite of infected ticks. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain area where it was first identified. However, it occurs in many other parts of the United States, including Missouri.

How do people get Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?

People ordinarily get Rocky Mountain spotted fever from the bite of an infected tick. At

least four to six hours of attachment and feeding on blood by the tick are required before

transmission can occur. Contamination of breaks in the skin or mucous membranes with

crushed tissues or feces of the tick may also lead to infection. It is not spread from person-to-person, except on rare occasions by blood transfusion.

What are the symptoms?

Sudden fever (which can last for two or three weeks), severe headache, tiredness, deep

muscle pain, chills, or nausea. In about half of the cases, a red, raised rash appears on the

arms and legs, particularly on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet, and then spreadsto the trunk. Rocky Mountain spotted fever can be fatal if not treated promptly.

How soon after exposure do symptoms appear?

The symptoms begin between 3 to 14 days after the tick bite.

What is the treatment?

It can be treated with antibiotics. Many people with the disease require hospitalization.

How should a tick be removed?

Ticks should be removed promptly and carefully by using tweezers and applying gentle,

steady traction. Do not crush the tick's body when removing it and apply the tweezers as

close to the skin as possible to avoid leaving tick mouthparts in the skin. Do not remove

ticks with your bare hands. Protect your hands with gloves, cloth, or tissue and be sure to

wash your hands after removing a tick.

After removing the tick, disinfect the skin with soap and water or other available

disinfectants.


Posts: 493 | From MidWest NorthWoods | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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