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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Tooth pain and Lyme

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Author Topic: Tooth pain and Lyme
DJP
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I have a terrible toothache in a tooth that has a cap on it. Don't know if it is Lyme related or not.

Anyhow, I remember reading about Lyme affecting teeth on this site. I looked in the newbie links but didn't find anything. Search isn't working for me.

Anyone have any information I can read up on? I'm calling the dentist, but would like to read up on it incase it could be Lyme related.

Thanks


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duke77
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Don't know if yours is caused by Lyme or not probably best to go to the dentist. I do know that Lyme can cause all sorts of teeth and jaw problems from first hand experience. The organism loves to live in the mucous membranes. Most of mine were phantom pains this was long before my diagnosis. Really they should educate dentist to be early detectors of Lyme. There are numerous people I talked to with Lyme who went to the dentist with phantom pains. Dentist says I don't see anything wrong and thinks your a wacko and sends you on your way.
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axelrose
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tap on the tooth gently, if hurts when tapping or biting,then abscessed and not related to lyme.
need abx and sterile root canal.
premed of clydamycin necessary if tooth is abscesed for for healling to completely occur after root canal since anaerobic bacteria are down in bone.

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GiGi
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Tapping for pain? None of my teeth hurt ever with or without tapping; whether they had a root canal already or not. Whether crowned or not. Yet when I had them removed, there was nothing left that could be considered a healthy tooth. Not only were the teeth contributing to my paralysis and total collapse of health, but a ton of jaw bone had to be removed surgically because the infection had turned my bone to mush. It could be lifted out with a spoon!

The advice from a lay person: If you have Lyme Disease, do not get a root canal unless you want to add to your problems. The toxins that root canals put out is only found in cadavers. Thio-ethers and mercaptans. It takes years to get them out of the body, if at all. And the make for the most toxic brain ever - that's where these toxins love to settle mainly.

Here some from Prof. Dr. Boyd Haley who has been researching these subjects for many years. His daughter I believe was very ill which caused him make this his life's work.
He is now Scientist of Record for Testimony to the U.S. Congress. His co-scientist, Bob Jones, inventor of the CAPITAT, recently stated at a seminar I attended by MD's and DDS's and other medical professionals that upon testing over a hundred root canaled teeth, he could not find one single healthy on.

I had myself 12 root canals and if I still had them they would be in my grave.

Eventually they all fail - often unbeknowns to the owner who slowly, slowly gets ill and more ill. This is from the Altcorp. site. You can go there and get the pictures to go with the text.

QUOTE "ROOT CANAL TREATMENT

AN OUTLINE OF TREATMENT OPTIONS WHAT IS ROOT CANAL TREATMENT?

Inside every tooth is the dental pulp which consists of nerve and blood supply. Its main role is in the growth of the tooth. It also helps detect changes in temperature.

The pulp may become inflamed and die. This usually occurs as a result of decay and/or trauma. This can sometimes be painful (acute pulpitis or abscess) or can occur without any pain at all and go on for years undetected (chronic periapical abscess) until it becomes painful or is detected from routine X-ray examination.

When the pulp dies, dead tissue sits inside the tooth (gangrene) and because there is no blood supply to fight the bacteria and toxins, this reservoir of infection remains inside the tooth. A root canal treatment attempts to clean out the inside of the tooth. Ideally the tooth should be sterile.

Decay or trauma causes the nerve to die. Trauma may be a blow to the tooth or imbalance in the bite with a grinding or clenching habit.

Toxins from pulp bacteria cause inflammation and infection in the bone which may be painful (acute abscess) or may have no pain associated with it (chronic abscess)

The main canals are identified, measured, cleaned and washed out, dressed with antiseptics and anti inflammatories and eventually filled with a powerful antiseptic.

Canals are measured, mechanically cleaned with files and irrigated with antiseptic solutions of hydrogen peroxide and Milton's. Then dressed with calcium hyrdoxide.
Biocalex ( CaO) is an alternative to gutta percha which it is believed penetrates the dentinal tubules if the canals are irrigated with 17% EDTA a chelating agent to remove the smear layer and open the dentinal tubules

A tooth without nerve and blood supply dries out and becomes brittle and needs to be strengthened.

The tooth often requires a crown for strength.

There is some question as to whether posts strengthen the tooth or not. The choices include

Custom made gold posts
carbon-fibred posts
titanium or stainless steel preformed.
Crowns may be

porcelain
gold
porcelain fused to gold
polyceramic

(the second most allergic dental metal material is gold - MELISA, Sweden /GG)

THE PROBLEMS AND TWO KEY QUESTIONS

QUESTION 1.

Can we completely sterilize a tooth rendering it free of bacteria or their toxins?

The answer is probably no. The problem is that the tooth is not simply 1,2, or 3 canals but is made up of millions of little tubules that are wide enough for bacteria to live in and multiply.

There may also be accessory canals, curved roots and branches. Because of the structure of a tooth we can not completely sterilise a tooth.

Tooth anatomy does not always conform to text book

The central or main canal is always surrounded by millions of dentinal tubules that are wide enough to harbour bacteria

Other problems may include

accessory canals
curved canals
incompletely filled canals" END QUOTE


Have a look and study all the various sections on http://www.altcorp.com/AffinityLaboratory/rcttreatment.htm

Good luck to you in the decision-making process. It's a tough one. I was there --
but I also am healed now and that was worth losing a few teeth. It was a long road and hard work to get rid of the toxic load. But it is very possible. Think healing!

Take care.





[This message has been edited by GiGi (edited 13 July 2005).]


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heiwalove
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gigi-

what do you recommend be done for a cavity?

health and blessings,
heather


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DJP
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I called the dentist for an appt, but I know if I ask if it is Lyme related he will probably say no. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't, that's why I'm asking.

Axelrose - I gave it a pretty good tap and it's a little sensitive, but it doesn't really hurt when I tap on it or bite down. This is an old cap, atleast a couple of years old. I don't remember if this one has a root canal or not.

Wouldn't the abx I'm on (biaxin and plaquenil) take care of any infection?

Gigi - I know I have at least one or two root canals already and a load of filings. Are fillings an issue as well?
I have to print and re-read your info to understand it. THanks


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axelrose
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no those abx don't work on anaerobic bacteria, hence the dilema gigi talks about.
yes there are many reasons not to get a root canal, all pointed out above, but this failure of a root canal is only recorded as 5% on all root canals recorded by the ADA.
whether this is true or not i tend to question.
i do agree with gigi that there are many reasons a root canal fails ,but the main one is vertical tooth fracture.
at this point in time my feeling is root canals are ok for vital teeth and teeth without abscesses. chronic sitting abscessed teeth need root canals along with apicoectomies(cavitation surgery at the root of the tooth).
why are you asking gigi what filling to put in your tooth if i am the dentist.
composite is ok but has toxic properties.the monomer is toxic and not biocompatible.
silver no
porcelain ok but get cemented with composite.
gold yes.
at this point in time the only biocompatible materials for the mouth are gold and titanium, using of time cements.
dd

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bpeck
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For years I thought I had problems with my teeth-
then I found out I had Lyme, and it was pain from trigeminal nerve pain- which can feel exactly like a tooth or teeth ache.
(This is not the same nerve as involved with TMJ)

So I for one, am glad I didn't have teeth pulled (and I have some root canals).

Now that I'm symptom free- I have no problems with my teeth.

Barb


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axelrose
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GOOD FOR YOU BARB, SOMEBODY THAT ACTUALLY USED THEIR NOGEN AND DID THE RIGHT THING.
YES, NOT ALL PAIN IS FROM TEETH BUT ALOT FROM THE NEURALGIA FROM THE 5TH AND SEVENTH CRANIAL NERVE.
THESE CAUSE TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA AND FACIAL NEURALGIA( BELL'S PALSY)
ALSO CAN AFFECT NERVES, TEAR DUCTS, GLANDS, LYMPH NODES, MUSCLES, TENDONS,TMJ, INNER EAR AND BACK OF NECK,ALL FROM LYME NOT TEETH

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DJP
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dd - Okay, and here's the weird part. After a few days of pain, the tooth is fine today, not even sensitive at all. I guess I should have the dentist take a look to make sure there isn't a fracture.

Thanks for the advice for fillings. What about old fillings? I have a mouth full of old metal fillings.

My plan was to replace as needed.


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axelrose
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djp replace as needed make sure they use a rubber dam and high speed suction with lots of water to remove. replace with composite.
trigeminal neuralgia comes and goes, i've had it on and off for 5 years.
the sensodyne does work when it is sensitive though

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heiwalove
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up for GiGi
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bpeck
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DJP;

Please read my post. 2 Up from this one.

Your description of your pain is fitting Trigeminal Nerve Pain which does not originate from the tooth itself. It's nerve pain.

People talk about having neuroLyme, but then they don't think that some of the pain they feel in specific places IS neurological, rather they think there's something wrong with the actual body part they're feeling the pain in... they think maybe infection in there- and want it removed.

Funny about teeth - they just must not be high on the priority list for most people.
I don't understand that thinking.

Barb



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GiGi
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THESE CAUSE TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA AND FACIAL NEURALGIA( BELL'S PALSY)
ALSO CAN AFFECT NERVES, TEAR DUCTS, GLANDS, LYMPH NODES, MUSCLES, TENDONS,TMJ, INNER EAR AND BACK OF NECK,ALL FROM LYME NOT TEETH

Sorry. I totally disagree with you. The basis for the infection to take hold was already there - . Infection does not flourish in clean terrain that is still well oxygenated and healthy. See "Heavy Metals and Chronic Disease" www.neuraltherapy.com - an article my doctor wrote many years ago. It still is as true today as it was then. Infection usually takes place in the weakest areas and spreads from there.
When the bioterrain is cleaned up, by whatever means necessary, half the battle is won. I have watched it happen in hundreds of patients that went through all the symptoms you mentioned above. Antibiotics was a minor part of the treatment; a few weeks at the most. Lyme was not the primary cause - it is a secondary happening.

This is my opinion and my doctor's opinion who is very successful treating Lyme based on that premise. It's a tough undertaking in any case -- we all know that.

Take care.


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GiGi
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If I needed a filling if I still had teeth, I would have the material tested before installation by a competent dentist who does compatibility testing. For anyone whose immune system is already compromised because of infections (Lyme is definitely more than just one infection - parasites, viruses, fungi, mold, etc.), one material might work just fine while it aggravates the next patient's autonomics. A lot depends what is in your mouth before you bring a new substance in. The alloys differ so greatly over the years you had work done. And several different metals in one mouth start to act like a car battery. My husband had five different metals in the mouth when he started to be unable to walk! I would only go for a carbon based material and only after I had it allergy tested. There are different ones to choose from for testing.
Many mercury-free dentists are doing this.

A good dentist who has learned about the horrible damages that have been done to some people over years, will test the material before he uses it. The DDS's that I know do ART testing. Everything, including the glue, singly and then the whole combination of all materials is tested before.

According to the research of the Swedes, MELISA, the most allergic material for people is nickle, the second is mercury and the third is G O L D (palladium) . Do the search. I have all the research in my files here, but I do not have time to look.

I was very allergic to gold/palladium.
My crowns contained palladium and I had to be detoxed from palladium long after my crowns were already out. My ANS (autonomic nervous system) reacted to it long afterward. Theeeee cause of autoimmune problems!!!!!!! My husband became allergic to his wedding band that had to be sawed off - it had been on his finger so many years.

I also had all the materials tested before our dentures were made. In the US, the pink coloring agent in the denture material or partial material still contains mercury. I do not think that has changed, because according to the ADA mercury is not toxic................... It is against the law in Germany and in all of Europe. So there were some materials that the dentist could not use for me. All tested with ART
(autonomic response testing) or good kinesiology (muscle testing) before they go permanently into the mouth. Once you got this filling or crown or denture, you are stuck with the bill and a new problem. The dentist who does not know about allergies caused by dental materials could care less. He will never know that you started to get more sick after his work was done. That's what is so sad about it all. The dentist will never find out that the failing root canal is what started to put the patient on a downward spiral. Doctors and dentists never meet - and once the bill is paid, you are stuck. D o n o t let that happen. Amalgam fillings were bad enough.

There is no way where I will ever change my mind on root canals until science comes up with a better fix. As they are done now, Bio-Calix or not, sooner or later they all fail, and if you are not sick yet with the one you still have, feel lucky. Sometimes it takes years. With me, at the age of 70something, it just kept going and going, one failed root canal now, another one later, this bridge and that bridge -- every year something else -- until the tick bite and the resulting Lyme disaster. Same identical story for my husband. Worst of all is the damaged jaw bone - less and less bone for any denture to hold onto. What then? Implants? Implants fail in unhealthy microorganism infested jawbone. The story never ends.... Be wise about it and study it thoroughly. It takes a long time to get these critters out of bone!

If you want to be certain about your mercury toxicity status, the MELISA tests are now done in the US, quite differently than they were a few years ago. Some European universities are busy and paying a lot of attention to the heavy metal problems. Look it up on the internet. The MELISA is a better test than any challenge test.

Take care.

P.S. If anyone has a root canal and is not sure about its contribution to your health or illness, have a TOPAS test done. It is done in the dentist chair, costs very little, and it will tell you at least the present condition. The dentist has to agitate the tooth a bit before he does the test -- only then will the results be correct. Prof. Haley's daughter lived with seizures for many years -- I was told she had one roo canal -- out of his eventually came the TOPAS test. You can learn about it on the www.altcorp.com website that I have posted many times. The test is less than $50. and is done in a few minutes on the spot. No sending to a lab, etc.

5% root canal failures is about as good a statistic as is the ADA's position on mercury. The medical doctor that is trying to fix the damage being done by a failed root canal has never exchanged any word with the dentist who put it in!!!!!! The dentist will never find out that his work started your downward spiral. He will be the last one to admit that. They don't meet in the cafeteria to talk. Sometimes I do not know who is worse - the AMA and Lyme or the ADA and mercury.

Off to my little glass of wine and a movie with my husband! Have a good night.

[This message has been edited by GiGi (edited 16 July 2005).]


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Ireallywant2believe
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I found this on a google search I think a lot of the links are no good but here's the article, there's a lot of good info in here:

Dental issues and Lyme: http://www.lymealliance.org/Medical/MedCategory7/Med15/med15.html


Lyme Disease and Orofacial Pain
Gary M. Heir, DMD


President Elect, American Academy of Orofacial Pain; Associate Clinical
Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of NJ; Department of
Oral Biology, Pathology and Diagnostic Services.


Adapted from the Newsletter of the American Academy of Orofacial Pain,
March 1998.


The healthcare provider involved with the diagnoses and management of orofacial
pain disorders must rely on a knowledge of various primary and/or secondary
disorders, which may manifest symptoms for which patients seek our aid. While a
majority of facial pain complaints are due to primary dental or orofacial
pathologies, many patients present with symptoms secondary to a primary
systemic illness. Included in these primary conditions is a spirochetal
infection; Lyme disease.


Lyme Disease is a rapidly emerging infectious disease. It represents 90% of all
vector-borne disease in the United States. Nearly 100,000 cases have been
reported since1980. This represents a 26-fo1d increase during the period of
1982-1996. While 70% of reported cases are found
in the Northeast, Lyme disease is also found in the North Central and Pacific
coastal regions. It must be assumed that children and adults in endemic areas
may be exposed to infection during school, work and recreational activities.
With the ease of travel, Lyme disease may also
present in regions of the country where it is not usually encountered.


It is important that all healthcare providers are familiar with the signs and
symptoms of this infectious disease.


Symptoms associated with Lyme disease include headache and facial pain that
often mimic dental pathology and oromandibular disorders.


Patients with complaints of vague, non-specific dental, facial or head pain,
who present with a multi-systemic, multi-treatment history, are suspect.


A nationwide survey via a questionnaire was distributed to patients with Lyme
disease. Only those subjects with positive testing were included in the study.
Respondents were clustered in the Northeastern states, northern California, the
north central states of Michigan and
Minnesota and central states such as Ohio.


Orofacial Pain Complaints Associated
with Lyme Disease


Recent data suggest that the temporomandibular joints are commonly
associated with a traumatic, non-dysfunctional Lyme arthritis. The data
from 120 patients with laboratory confirmed Lyme disease responding to the
survey found that 75% reported pain of the masticatory musculature and 72%
reported symptoms of TMJ pain. Of those responding, only 4 of 90 patients
reported a history of a traumatic jaw injury. The majority of these patients
reported the spontaneous onset of their temporomandibular pain. Of those with
Lyme disease reporting a temporomandibular disorder or myofascial pain, 75%
indicated that their symptoms intensified on a cyclical basis with other
symptoms related to Lyme disease. In such cases, only palliative treatment is
indicated while the patient is medically evaluated.


Dental pain or toothache, often in the absence of clinical or radiographic
evidence, is another haracteristic of Lyme disease. Dental pain in the absence
of detectable dental pathology was reported by 60% of those responding to this
survey. These patients also reported that their dental pain had a tendency to
move from tooth to tooth, change quadrants, or move from side to side. Of
these, 36% had multiple dental treatments including endodontia and extraction
with little benefit.


Glossodynia, or burning mouth, was reported by 25% of patients, while
70% reported sore throat.


Facial pain complaints other then those simulating toothache or a
temporomandibular disorder are also seen with Lyme disease. A variety of
dyesthesias, neuropathic or vascular complaints are more common then
previously thought. Of Lyme patients reporting facial pain, 88% associated
these complaints with other symptoms of Lyme disease.


Headache is another complaint common to the Lyme patient. It has been
previously reported that 53% of Lyme patients hospitalized for neurological
manifestations of Lyme disease describe some form of
headache disorder. As with other symptoms, these headaches appear to
cycle along with other pain complaints associated with Lyme disease.


The results of this survey found that 49% of patients reported headache
associated with other symptoms of their Lyme disease.


Headache ranged from sinus-like pain through tension-type and migraine. The
dental practitioner may also be confronted with patients manifesting
neurological symptoms.Unilateral facial nerve palsy was
reported by 27% of those responding. Four of the 120 patients reported
bilateral paralysis. Trigeminal neuralgia was reported by 25% of patients.


Summary


Lyme disease is a debilitating illness that may present as dental or orofacial
pain to the dental practitioner. All healthcare providers must be aware of
this clinical entity and be able to consider this infectious disease in
differential diagnoses.


The dentist and allied health care provider can play a significant role in the
early diagnosis and treatment of this often debilitating disease. You are
encouraged to learn more about this illness and
exercise diligence in evaluating suspect patients. A prompt and appropriate
referral to a medial specialist is imperative.


For additional information, contact Dr. Heir at [email protected], or at UMD-NJ
Dental School, OBPDS, 110 Bergen Street, Newark, NJ 0710
-------------------------------------------------------------- http://igm-02.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/IGM_robot.pl?
search=Subject=toothache+AND+Subject=lyme+OR+Subject=burgdorferi+OR+Subj
ect=Erythema+Chronicum+Migrans+OR+Subject=borreli*+ixodes+OR+Subject=Ery
thema+Migrans+NOT+glossitis+OR+Subject=garinii+OR+Subject=afzelii+OR+Subject=neuroborreli*&datafile=MEDLINE


TITLE: Differentiation of orofacial pain related to Lyme disease from
other dental and facial pain disorders.
AUTHORS: Heir GM
AUTHOR AFFILIATION: Department of Oral Pathology, Biology and
Diagnostic Sciences, University of Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey
Dental School, Newark, USA.
SOURCE: Dent Clin North Am 1997 Apr;41(2):243-58
CITATION IDS: PMID: 9142482 UI: 97287390
ABSTRACT: The diagnostic process for the orofacial pain patient is often
perplexing. Compounding the process of solving a diagnostic mystery is the
multiplicity of etiologic factors. The propensity for Lyme disease to present
with symptoms mimicking dental and
temporomandibular disorders makes the task even more complex. It is hoped that
the reader is cognizant of the fact that a pathologic process of dental
structures--the teeth and their attachments to the mandible and maxilla, the
temporomandibular joints, masticatory
musculature, and vascular supply and sensory innervation of the oromandibular
anatomy--may also be the source of facial pain. Although unique, similar
complaints may also be manifestations of other causes, including pain
associated with Lyme disease. The informed and
fastidious clinician does not overlook these possibilities when evaluating the
headache and facial pain patient. The clinician should
be equipped with the knowledge and minimal armamentarium to evaluate
the patient appropriately. To paraphrase from Sherlock Holmes, we must first
eliminate the impossible, whatever is left is the truth, no matter how
unlikely. A differential diagnosis must be achieved based on clinical
experience, unbiased observations, and probability.


MAIN MESH HEADINGS: Facial Pain/*etiology Lyme Disease/*diagnosis
Temporomandibular Joint disorders/*diagnosis
ADDITIONAL MESH HEADINGS: Diagnosis, Differentia fibromyalgia/diagnosis
Headache/etiology
Human
Lyme Disease/complications
Myofascial Pain Syndromes/diagnosis
Neuralgia/diagnosis
Stomatitis, Denture/diagnosis
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/complications
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/etiology
Toothache/etiology
1997/04
1997/01 00:00
PUBLICATION TYPES: JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
LANGUAGES: Eng
-------------------------------------------------------------- http://igm-02.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/IGM_robot.pl?
search=Subject=periodontal+diseases+OR+Subject=peridontal+OR+Subject=den
tal+AND+Subject=lyme+OR+Subject=burgdorferi+OR+Subject=Erythema+Chronicu
m+Migrans+OR+Subject=borreli*+ixodes+OR+Subject=Erythema+Migrans+NOT+glo
ssitis+OR+Subject=garinii+OR+Subject=afzelii+OR+Subject=neuroborreli*&datafile=MEDLINE
TITLE: Lyme disease awareness for the New Jersey dentist. A survey of
orofacial and headache complaints associated with Lyme disease.
AUTHORS: Heir GM; Fein LA
AUTHOR AFFILIATION: Department of Oral Pathology, Biology and
Diagnostic Services, UMDNJ, USA.
SOURCE: J N J Dent Assoc 1998 Winter;69(1):19, 21, 62-3 passim
CITATION IDS: PMID: 9584762 UI: 98245741
ABSTRACT: The incidence of Lyme disease is increasing in New Jersey.
In 1996, 2,190 cases were reported, representing an increase of 487
cases from the 1,703 reported in 1995 [Table 1]. Symptoms associated
with Lyme disease include headache and facial pain that often mimics dental
pathology and temporomandibular disorders. Patients with complaints of vague,
non-specific dental, facial or head pain, who present with a multisystemic,
multi-treatment history, are suspect.
This article discusses Lyme disease in New Jersey and the clinical presentation
of Lyme disease that the dental practitioner may encounter. A summary of data
is provided which was collected from 120
patients diagnosed with laboratory confirmed Lyme disease. The most
common orofacial, head and dental complaints seen in the Lyme disease
patient are reviewed. This information will hopefully aid in establishing a
diagnosis and appropriate referral where indicated.
MAIN MESH HEADINGS: *Dental Care for Chronically Ill
Facial Pain/*diagnosis
Headache/*diagnosis
Lyme Disease/*diagnosis
ADDITIONAL MESH HEADINGS: Facial Pain/etiology
Headache/etiology
Human
Incidence
Lyme Disease/complications
Lyme Disease/epidemiology
New Jersey/epidemiology
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
1998/05
1998/19 02:02
PUBLICATION TYPES: JOURNAL ARTICLE
LANGUAGES: Eng
-------------------------------------------------------------- TITLE: Lyme
disease: considerations for dentistry.
AUTHORS: Heir GM; Fein LA
AUTHOR AFFILIATION: TMD and Orofacial Pain Center, University of
Medicine and Dentistry, New Jersey Dental School, Newark, USA.
SOURCE: J Orofac Pain 1996 Winter;10(1):74-86
CITATION IDS: PMID: 8995919 UI: 97149111
ABSTRACT: Although Lyme disease has spread rapidly and it is difficult
to diagnose, a review of the dental literature does not reveal many
references to this illness. Dental practitioners must be aware of the
systemic effects of this often multiorgan disorder. Its clinical manifestations
may include facial and dental pain, facial nerve palsy, headache,
temporomandibular joint pain, and masticatory muscle pain.
The effects precipitated when performing dental procedures on a patient with
Lyme disease must also be considered. This study discusses the epidemiology and
diagnosis of Lyme disease, its prevention, and factors to consider when making
a differential diagnosis. Dental care of the
patient with Lyme disease and currently available treatments also are
considered. Three case reports are presented.
MAIN MESH HEADINGS: Facial Pain/*etiology
Facial Paralysis/*etiology
Lyme Disease/*complications
Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome/*etiology
ADDITIONAL MESH HEADINGS: Adult
Case Report
Dental Care for Chronically Ill
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Human
Lyme Disease/epidemiology
Medical History Taking
Middle Age
Prevalence
United States/epidemiology
1996/01
1996/01 00:00
PUBLICATION TYPES: JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
REVIEW, TUTORIAL
LANGUAGES: Eng
-------------------------------------------------------------- Chap 4 -
Borreliae From Mucous Membranes: http://www.medscape.com/SLACK/JSTD/1999/v06.n02/std0602.ch04.fels/std060
2.ch04.fels.html


Also you might want to look at old LDF conference archives: http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Oasis/6455/conferences-links.html


And see(go to the site and use search term 'dental' for the following
results--go to the site and you can click on each reference and get the whole
abstract where available:

http://search.lymenet.org/
The Lyme Disease Network
Medical / Scientific Literature Database
Search Results


The following references met your criteria:


[1] LYME DISEASE AWARENESS FOR THE NEW JERSEY DENTIST. A SURVEY OF OROFACIAL
AND HEADACHE COMPLAINTS ASSOCIATED WITH LYME DISEASE.
Authors: Heir GM Fein LA
Source: J N J Dent Assoc 1998 Winter;69(1):19, 21, 62-3 passim


[2] LYME DISEASE: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DENTISTRY.
Authors: Heir GM Fein LA
Source: J Orofac Pain 1996 Winter;10(1):74-86


[3] DIFFERENTIATION OF OROFACIAL PAIN RELATED TO LYME DISEASE FROM OTHER
DENTAL AND FACIAL PAIN DISORDERS.
Authors: Heir GM
Source: Dent Clin North Am 1997 Apr;41(2):243-58


[4] BORRELIA BURGDORFERI-SEROPOSITIVE CHRONIC ENCEPHALOMYELOPATHY:
LYME NEUROBORRELIOSIS? AN AUTOPSIED REPORT.
Authors: Kobayashi K Mizukoshi C Aoki T Muramori F Hayashi M Miyazu K
Koshino Y Ohta M Nakanishi I Yamaguchi N
Source: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 1997 Nov-Dec;8(6):384-90


[5] THE TETRACYCLINES.
Authors: Smilack JD
Source: Mayo Clin Proc 1999 Jul;74(7):727-9


[6] COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSES' KNOWLEDGE OF LYME DISEASE: IMPLICATIONS FOR
SURVEILLANCE AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION.
Authors: Capps PA Pinger RR Russell KM Wood ML
Source: J Community Health Nurs 1999;16(1):1-15


[7] CIRCULAR AND LINEAR PLASMIDS OF LYME DISEASE SPIROCHETES HAVE EXTENSIVE
HOMOLOGY: CHARACTERIZATION OF A REPEATED DNA ELEMENT.
Authors: Zuckert WR Meyer J
Source: J Bacteriol 1996 Apr;178(8):2287-98


[8] BLOOD PRODUCT-ASSOCIATED BACTERIAL SEPSIS.
Authors: Goldman M Blajchman MA
Source: Transfus Med Rev 1991 Jan;5(1):73-83


[9] LYME DISEASE: AN IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION IN THE DIFFERENTIAL
DIAGNOSIS OF TMD.
Authors: Kelsey JH
Source: J Mich Dent Assoc 1990 Apr-May;72(4-5):209-10


[10] LYME DISEASE MISDIAGNOSED AS A TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDER.
Authors: Lader E
Source: J Prosthet Dent 1990 Jan;63(1):82-5


[11] LYME DISEASE MISDIAGNOSED AS TMJ SYNDROME. A CASE REPORT.
Authors: Lader E
Source: N Y State Dent J 1989 Nov;55(9):46, 48, 50-2


[12] ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS: UPDATE ON COMMON CLINICAL USES.
Authors: Weitekamp MR Caputo GM
Source: Am Fam Physician 1993 Sep 15;48(4):597-604


[13] LYME DISEASE--THE GREAT IMITATOR.
Authors:
Source: Wis Dent Assoc J 1988 Sep;64(9):487, 489
--------------------------------------------------------------
Title: Lyme disease misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular joint disorder.
Authors: Lader E
Source: J Prosthet Dent 1990 Jan;63(1):82-5
Organization:


Abstract:
Craniomandibular disorders cause many pleomorphic and seemingly unrelated
clinical manifestations that mimic other more serious medical problems and thus
can present physicians and dentists with a challenge that invites misdiagnosis
and improper treatment planning. Conversely,
misdiagnosis and ineffective treatment planning are facilitated when serious
medical problems manifest a range of signs and symptoms that are clinically
similar to temporomandibular joint muscle dysfunction At times, the patient's
response to therapy may be the best method of corroborating a diagnosis, as
illustrated in this report of a patient
with Lyme disease that was misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular joint disorder.
Lyme disease has already reached epidemic proportions in several parts of the
United States and its geographic distribution is spreading. Because Lyme
disease is a life-threatening illness whose
clinical manifestations can mimic temporomandibular joint/myofascial
pain-dysfunction, it is the responsibility of every dentist who treats
craniomandibular disorders to become familiar with the clinical presentations
of Lyme disease and more proficient in its differential diagnosis.


Keywords:
Adult, Case Report, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Human, Lyme
Disease, DIAGNOSIS, DRUG THERAPY, Penicillins, THERAPEUTIC USE,
Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome, DIAGNOSIS


Language: Eng


Unique ID: 90112183
--------------------------------------------------------------Title: Lyme
disease misdiagnosed as TMJ syndrome. A case report.
Authors: Lader E
Source: N Y State Dent J 1989 Nov;55(9):46, 48, 50-2
Organization:


Abstract:
Due to the high incidence of Lyme disease, the ease with which it can
be misdiagnosed, and its potential for causing irreversible neurologic or
cardiac complications and fatalities if left untreated, all patients living in
known epidemic areas who manifest intractable facial pain, or what appears to
be a case of temporomandibular joint syndrome that does not respond to therapy
should be tested for Lyme Borelliosis. It should be remembered however, that
not all patients with active Lyme disease produce antibodies, and it is thus
imperative for the clinician to obtain a detailed patient history with a
focused series of questions
directed at the known presentations of the disease, with specific emphasis
placed on the prior appearance of an ECM lesion.


Keywords:
Adult, Case Report, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Human, Lyme
Disease, DIAGNOSIS, PHYSIOPATHOLOGY, New York, Temporomandibular Joint
Syndrome, DIAGNOSIS


Language: Eng


Unique ID: 90045239


quote:
Originally posted by DJP:
I have a terrible toothache in a tooth that has a cap on it. Don't know if it is Lyme related or not.

Anyhow, I remember reading about Lyme affecting teeth on this site. I looked in the newbie links but didn't find anything. Search isn't working for me.

Anyone have any information I can read up on? I'm calling the dentist, but would like to read up on it incase it could be Lyme related.

Thanks



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axelrose
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gigi: your assumption is totally false.
lyme can hit normaltissue and cause infection, aerobic and anaerobic.
your source are wrong on this subject.
any bacteria can hit any healthly source and cause infection, the disease does not need to be unhealthly for bacteria to cause infection.
gigi you don't have anything but plastic teeth so why are you so concerned about filling material. there are only 3 on the market and the dentist must use one of these three period.

your posting are great,they are so long i stopped reading them, do you think you can just answer the persons question, or do you have to site every site on the internet???


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lymelady
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 6207

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Please help.
Was taking mepron and clindy for babs now in the middle of
big herx and had to stop for a while. A tooth that
anchors a bridge (tooth 21) has died so says
endodontist and regular dentist, pain swelling etc.
Clindy cleared it up but endo says I need to have a
root canal and am scheduled to go in a week.

I am petrifed. Due to herx had to switch med to
erythromycin, taking every 6 hours, but it is not working like clindy and there is pain and sweeling making me think there is babs in the infection also.

You can't leave a dead tooth in your mouth can you?
your jaw gets infected etc etc. If I pull it out comes
the entire bridge. No
biological dentists around here.
Any advice would be so welcome, my endo knows nothing
about lyme disease.
this is an emergency.
Thanks,
Lymelady


Posts: 484 | From Fredericksburg, Va USA | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
GiGi
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 259

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This is what I would do if I were in that predicament again. I was in the same boat for years on end. One tooth failed. Root canal. Root canal on wider bridge. Next tooth failed. Root canal on even wider bridge or another bridge. It went on and on.

If a root canal were the end of my problems, I would agree to the bridge. But with an already infected mouth, it usually is not the solution.

If it were me again, I would have the tooth removed and the area cleaned out thoroughly into the bone. Then I would get a partial denture replacing the lost tooth/bridge. If you are unfortunate enough and lose another tooth in years to come, you can hang it on to the existing partial.

I did resort to that solution, a partial, years later and it was the best thing I ever did. No more grinding down of existing teeth to make yet another bridge. As it was, I ended up with a total of 12 root canals -- lots of Dimethyl Sulfite (plays a role in MS, Parkinsons, Alzheimers) that interacts with other body tissues, liver tissues; proteins change into new foreign proteins not natural to us attacked by immune system = next stop more allergies,,, etc.

The resident dentist here will give you a total reversal of this. That's fine. Listen to yourself after you research all.
No average dentist is going to shy away from doing a root canal and a bridge - that's why he is in business. Funny, though, many of them are out of work and I get soliciting phone calls from dentists now!!!!! I have the feeling people are becoming more aware.

Please look up root canals on http://www.altcorp.com/AffinityLaboratory/rcttreatment.htm. The root canal removed from Prof. Dr. Haley's daughter saved her from seizures and more. Read the book "Root Canal Cover-up" by George Meinig.

As an end results to my ordeal with root canals: I am healthy and happy and clear of Lyme and all infection, all symptoms, toothless with a wonderful porcellan denture replacement that chews nuts and bolts without hurting ever.

Lymelady, Losing one tooth/bridge is not the end of the world. I wished I had known that forty years ago. My best to you!

Take care.

[This message has been edited by GiGi (edited 16 July 2005).]


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lymelady
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Member # 6207

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Thanks Gigi for response,
I am seriously thinking of having this tooth pulled out. I cannot get any sicker than I already am and in the long run continuing to fool with it, suffer from it, is going to cost me a fortune in every way.
Thanks
Lymelady

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