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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Nanobacteria and Bartonella

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Author Topic: Nanobacteria and Bartonella
seibertneurolyme
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1: Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online). 2004 Mar 3;58:60-4. Related Articles, Links


[Nanobacteria--microbiological characteristics]

[Article in Polish]

Wilk I, Martirosian G.

Katedra i Zaklad Mikrobiologii, Slaskiej Akademii Medycznej, Kkatowice.

We have reviewed recent publications regarding the microbiological characteristic and pathogenicity of a novel infectious agent, the mineral-forming, sterile-filterable, slow-growing Gram-negative Nanobacteria, detected in bovine/human blood, kidney cyst fluid, urine and kidney stones. According to their 16S rDNA structure, nanobacteria belong to the alpha-2 Proteobacteria, subgroup, which includes the Brucella and Bartonella species. Their cell diameter is 0.2-0.5 microm (the smallest known cell-walled bacteria). Their most remarkable characteristic is the formation of carbonate apatite crystals of neutral pH and at physiologic phosphate and calcium concentrations. The extracellular mineralization forms a hard protective shelter for these hardy microorganisms, and enables them to survive conditions of physical stress that would be lethal to most other bacterial species. The Olavi Kajander group (Finland) suggests that the apatite produced by nanobacteria may play a key role in the formation of all kidney stones, by providing a central calcium phosphate deposit around which other crystalline components can collect. Nanobacteria seems to be a causative agent of diseases related to biomineralization processes.

Publication Types:
Review
Review, Tutorial

PMID: 15069381 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Posts: 7306 | From Martinsville,VA,USA | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
seibertneurolyme
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See http://www.nanobaclabs.com for more info.

PubMed article has me a little confused. Does it mean that nanobacteria are related to Bartonella bacteria?

I am very interested as hubby has tested positive to nanobacteria before and currently has a small kidney stone. He did not do a full course of treatment for nanobacteria as the tetracycline upset his stomach so much at the time and then we kind of moved on and put this on the back burner.

He has never tested positive to Bartonella, although he has been treated based on clinical G.I. symptoms.

I have never read anything that says how nanobacteria are transmited -- through a tickbite ?????

Bea Seibert


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mycoplasma1
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Apparently they are transmitted through catheters in hospitals and are in water, milk (pasteurization does not kill them), saliva, sexually etc...

People with good immune systems can fight them off, but when we become overloaded with too many pathogens (co-infections etc..) and begin to age, they can become a problem.

Nanobacteria and the L-form bacteria are what create TH1 diseases (inflammatory diseases) according to Trevor Marshall and others like Lida Mattman.

This is precisely what The MP treats.

My Dr. also uses EDTA for calcium deposits.

Chris


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janet thomas
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Thanks Bea, very interesting.

Sorry but I can't answer your question.


Posts: 2001 | From NJ | Registered: Mar 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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